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W Schwartz vs Lionel Adalbert Bagration Felix Kieseritzky
"Easy Like Sunday Morning" (game of the day Mar-20-2011)
Paris (1842)
Queen's Gambit Accepted: Saduleto Variation (D20)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sneaky: This game is so very much like the Immortal Game it seems like analysis.
Mar-20-11  redmaninaustin: I think Kieseritky wore himself out writing his full name on the scorecard - this could explain the defeat.
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: On move 19 white could have made played Nb4, Nb6, Nc3, Nc7, Ne3, or Nxe7 instead of Nf6, and the result would still have been the same. It's too bad that f4 was unavailable.
Mar-20-11  roastedrook: I don't know if Schwartz was blind or some thing but here's a mate in three: 14.Bb5+ Nd7 15.Bxd7+Kd8 16.Ne6#
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <roastedrook> After <14.Bb5+>:


click for larger view

Black can escape the immediate mate by <14...Nc6>. In fact, does White even win then?

Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: <rilkefan> After <8...Qxd5>:


click for larger view

White can just get the pawn back by 9.Qxd5 cxd5 10.Nf4, and looks to have a good game afterward. However, this being 1842, he would probably play something like 9.Qc3 and keep the Nf4 move in reserve.

Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: The "Lionel" portion of his name triggers the pun "Easy like Sunday Morning", one of Lionel Ritchie's fine songs.

[Lionel_____________Kieseritsky].

Most creative, by these folks!

Mar-20-11  weary willy: <WannaBe: You never seen the name of the female chess player (I can't recall the name) and she was married 7 or is it 8 times, and kept all the names... I am sure someone here at CG will know what's her name. =) - Sneaky: <WannaBe> Dr. Jana Malypetrova Hartston Miles Bellin>

Only she didn't keep all the names, of course. It's just CG's (helpful) way of enabling us to track a single person who played under different names, thanks to our idea that a woman should take her husband's surname on marriage.

We don't find a similar requirement when a male player teams up with different females (in series or in parallel) because men made up the surname rules and found it easier to keep their original name.

Mar-20-11  Llawdogg: Phony Benoni: Excellent analysis of the Bagration. That always tickles my funny bone too. But what do you make of Adalbert?
Mar-20-11  scormus: Another great, multi-pun. I think we should all be grateful to Mr Kieseritsky for the memorable brilliancies played to beat him. This is a beauty. Lovely 2R-sac - I guess it is sound all the way through
Mar-20-11  mucher1: Another road to victory seems to be 14.Ne6 (Nd7 15.Bb5).
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Kieseritzky was actually a strong player - not that you would ever guess that from this game. Anderssen only scored +7=2-6 against him. http://tinyurl.com/49vk92y That included, most famously, the Immortal Game - which was only an offhand game at London 1851, played during the Great Tournament. Soltis wrote about how no one could lose with as much panache as Kieseritzky - when he lost, he didn't just get ground down in inferior endings; no, his opponents won coruscating brilliancies where they sacked every piece in sight.
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Here's a nice endgame crush by the K-Man: Anderssen vs Kieseritzky, 1851
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: In J Schulten vs Kieseritzky, 1844, K mated White off the board with the same ridiculous gambit later played, less successfully, by K in the Immortal Game and in Short vs Kasparov, 1993 (though ChessGames' database actually shows Black scoring extremely well with it).
Mar-20-11  newzild: <weary willy> <Only she didn't keep all the names, of course. It's just CG's (helpful) way of enabling us to track a single person who played under different names, thanks to our idea that a woman should take her husband's surname on marriage.>

Really? It's my understanding that she did, in fact, keep the names of her former husbands. That was her choice - not forced on her by "our idea".

Mar-20-11  Ratt Boy: <newzild> <It's my understanding that she did, in fact, keep the names of her former husbands...>

Well, Wiki calls her "Jana Bellin," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jana_B... . Googling "Jana Bellin" yields 222K hits; "Jana Malypetrova" gives 1530.

By the BTW, if Wanda Sykes had married Howard Hughes, and then Henry Kissinger, she'd be Wanda Hughes Kissinger now.

Mar-20-11  goodevans: <Phony Benoni: <rilkefan> After <8...Qxd5> White can just get the pawn back by 9.Qxd5 cxd5 10.Nf4, and looks to have a good game afterward. However, this being 1842, he would probably play something like 9.Qc3 and keep the Nf4 move in reserve.>

I guess I'm just old fashioned because before I'd even looked at your post I'd decided I liked <8 ... Qxd5 9 Qc3> for white. It's surprisingly complicated, but as far as I can see if black tries too hard to hold onto his extra pawn he ends up being mashed. In many lines, if he plays < ... Qe4+> he ends up with his Q trapped.

It seems the whole idea behind <7 ... Bd5> is that after <8 Nxd5 cxd5> black has straightened out his pawns. "Bagration" at least shows some positional understanding with this although he clearly underestimated the importance of the <e6> weakness.

Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessmensch: What if Kathleen Battle married Emanuel Ax?
Mar-20-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: Nice mate. :)
Mar-20-11  WhiteRook48: dang... Kieseritsky keeps losing the brilliances
Mar-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Is Schwartz another name for Anderssen?
Oct-12-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Despite this fine example, 3...f5 has never taken off. Opening Explorer Kieseritsky also originated the Smith-Morra Gambit, which languished for a century before becoming (somewhat) popular. Opening Explorer Maybe 3...f5 will have to wait two centuries.
Oct-13-12  Abdel Irada: I think White actually did have a marginally faster mate starting with 15. Be6. Here Black would have three options:

<(1) 15. ...Kd8
16. Qxf8, Kc7
17. Nd5, Kc6
18. Qe8, Nd7
19. Qxd7#.>

<<>(2) 15. ...Kc7 16. Nd5, Kc6>
(if 16. ...Kd8; 17. Qxf8#)
<<>17. Qe8, Nd7 18. Qxd7#.>

<<<>>(3) 15. ...Kc6 16. Qe8 and one of

(3.1) 16. ...Nd7
17. Qxd7, Kb6
18. Nd5, Ka6
19. Qa4#,

(3.2) 16. ...Kc7
17. Nd5#, or

(3.3) 16. ...Kb6
17. Nd5, Ka6
18. Qa4#.>

Of course, this is mere Monday-morning quarterbacking. A mate is a mate. :-)

Apr-20-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheTamale: The motto of the first half of the 19th century: "Win if you can, lose if you must... but always play P-KB4."
Apr-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: I came upon this game via Kieseritzsky's <Fifty Games Played in the Chess Circle at the Cafe de la Regence (>

http://books.google.com/books?id=aK...

A lot of the games don't seem to be in the cg database. That may not be an altogether bad thing....

Anyway, here Kieseritzky shows the same stalwart defensive technique that Anderssen later Immortalized. Still, nice of K. to publish both games.

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