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Vassily Ivanchuk vs Neuris Delgado Ramirez
"Chucky's Back" (game of the day May-21-2005)
Capablanca Memorial (Elite) (2005), Havana CUB, rd 10, May-15
Sicilian Defense: Boleslavsky. General Variation (B58)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
May-21-05  ArturoRivera: I once saw Neuris Delgado playing in a tournament in Mexico "El abierto de Guadalajara", GM Marcel Sisniega (cisniega?) analized his game on board one :)
May-21-05  underrated: white dosnt let up on that d5 square from the get go eventually causing black to lose the hanger on d6...all-n-all, Ivanchuk plays almost as good as i do
May-21-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  An Englishman: Good Evening: Pillsbury once said, "Help your pieces so they can help you." Invanchuk's Bishop moves from 58-61 are a great example of how this works. The Bishop on f1 not only shields the King from back rank checks, it supports Rd3, the move which cracks Black's defenses.
May-21-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: Black's dilly dally Knight moves from d7 to b6, and Queen from c6 to c8 seem to me to be the source of Black's problems. It's amazing to replay this game, and see the focus on d5 as surely as a spotlight was shining on it.
May-21-05  Gavnyce: Ivanchuk maybe the best player in the world now. not in rating but in thinking amazing
May-21-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White wins the queen or mates on c8.

a few famous lines from Chucky the doll:

"Peek-a-boo". "Presto-you're dead"
"How's it hangin' Phil?"

May-21-05  weirdoid: Very funny maneuvering by Ivanchuk from move 11 to around 35 - for so many moves seemed like the square d5 was all that matter, and it was done in the oddest looking way (Q hides in a2? then, it goes to f3?).

Also, I wonder if Delgado's tactics around move 53 did not in fact just hastened his defeat. He won his opponent's queen, for sure, but by that tima he was two (passed!) pawns behinds, and could no longer count on defending and relying on opposite colored bishops.

May-21-05  notyetagm: Based on Ivanchuk's superb performance at the Capablanca Memorial and Kramnik's dismal play at M-Tel, Chucky may just pass Kramnik on the July 1 FIDE rating list.
May-21-05  catlover: <ArturoRivera><I once saw Neuris Delgado playing in a tournament in Mexico "El abierto de Guadalajara>

Is Delgado Mexican?

May-21-05  catlover: I'm not a fan of the Chucky movies, so I won't comment on the pun, but this is a beautiful game by Ivanchuk. He slowly outmanouevers Delgado, picks up a few pawns and then I imagine 54. Rxe5 and 55.Qxd4 must have been a horrible shock.
May-23-05  notyetagm: This game is a wonderful illustration that <a queen is not a strong piece if it has no targets (weaknesses) to attack>. The safety of the White king renders the Black queen impotent. White's rook, bishop, and connected passed c- and d-pawns then simply overwhelm the Black queen.
Jun-06-05  patzer2: Ivanchuk is indeed back, easily defeating a strong GM opponent in this impressive win with strong positional play.

I found the Queen sacrifice combination, starting with 54. Rxe5!, amusing and instructive. If Black tries to hold with 56...Qc5!?, play might have continued 57. Re1! Qd6 58. Rd1! Kf6 59. c5! Qxc5 60. d6! Qc2 61. Re1 Qd2 62. d7! .

Jun-08-05
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: 11 Bxf6! An example of a clever exchange of a B for a knight - White now dominates d5 in conjunction with c3 (prevents Knight to b4 etc - and opens the a2-g8 diagonal) - this is a superb game by Ivachuk
Jun-09-05  sharkbenjamin: Great Game!
Jul-15-05  pencuse: Ivanchuk's game style reminds Karpov's game style. Long manoeuvres, 23. Nh2, 24. Ng4, 25. Ne3, long plans to use d5 square, attacking b5.. Karpov style. Ivanchuk will be more powerful in the coming years.
Nov-19-06  Margulies: Why not 42. Rd7 ??
Apr-12-09  WhiteRook48: 73 Bh3 aims at the c8-square
Jun-30-09  WhiteRook48: 42 Rd7 Rc7
Aug-31-17  PaperSlim: Starting with move 33 black's moves make no sense. He practically gives the d6 pawn as a present
Aug-16-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  fredthebear: ~

<weirdoid>
<Also, I wonder if Delgado's tactics around move 53 did not in fact just hastened his defeat. He won his opponent's queen, for sure, but by that time he was two (passed!) pawns behinds, and could no longer count on defending and relying on opposite colored bishops.>

Agreed. Black gave up pawn, bishop, and rook to get the White queen, which is exactly what she's worth on the point value system. Of course, Black was not given much say in the matter; White was the instigator. The capture sequence 54., 55., and 56., leaves White with two connected passed pawns and safe backward pawns, while Black is lacking opportunity.

Creative planning by Ivanchuck to swing the White bishop around 58.Bd7, 59.Bh3, 61.Bf1 (a decisive move w/Stockfish 8) to protect 62.Rd3, now behind the passed d-pawn for it's advance.

Black's queen is left to do all the fighting herself. There's no way to remove White's well-positioned defenders. 70...Qg4+ and 71...Qxp are harmless while White marches up the board. She has a useless spite check, but no perpetual check available.

In the final position shown, White is threatening 73.Rc8#.

The final Stockfish notes show that 72...Qxd6 is no good, just getting immediately forked by 73.Rd7+. After this exchange, White's distant bishop protects the passed d7-pawn, which would permanently place the Black king on guard duty protecting the d8-promotion square. He can't leave but one dark square, and there's no other help. The Black pawns can do nothing useful either. It's not actually zugzwang, but it's the next worst position.

Thus, after the capture of the White queen, it's White that takes complete control of the game by carefully placing his remaining bishop and rook to serve the pawns.

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