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Veselin Topalov vs Viswanathan Anand
"Indian's Queen Defense" (game of the day Apr-02-2018)
FIDE World Championship Tournament (2005), San Luis ARG, rd 2, Sep-29
Queen's Indian Defense: Fianchetto. Check Variation Intermezzo Line (E15)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Veselin Topalov vs Viswanathan Anand (2005) Indian's Queen Defense
Photograph copyright © 2005 World Chess Championship Press.  Used with permission.


Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 107 OF 107 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-16-09  SetNoEscapeOn: Congrats hitman! The "Indian's Defense" in this game was symbolic as well. Anand's world title aspirations took a huge hit in San Luis but he was not done fighting.
Jun-16-09  WhiteRook48: this is so funny!! the Indian did a queen defense!
Jun-16-09  RandomVisitor: 85.f5+ Kd5 86.Qd7+ Kc4 87.Qe6+ Kb5 88.Qd5+ Kb6 89.Qd4+ Kb5 90.h7 and white wins.

Improvements?

Jun-16-09  cjrubiks: Good, tough game. And the best pun ever: great one, Hitman.
Jul-26-09  WhiteRook48: maybe not...
Aug-10-09  Dredge Rivers: You know what this game needs? MORE KIBITZING! :)
Sep-14-09  Karnatakiaditya: Great pun for a great game ...
Oct-11-09  Cercatore: Why 19. Nc4?
Jan-02-11  notyetagm: Chess Today annotations from the free sample issue:

http://chesstoday.net/issues/CT-178...

Jan-02-11  notyetagm: Game Collection: ENEMY KING MAKES A GREAT SECOND TARGET

Topalov vs Anand, 2005

May-30-11  bartonlaos: Oh, my goodness ... 106 pages on THIS game?? What's makes this interesting at all - there's not even a debate!
Jun-06-11  bartonlaos: 107 and counting..
Jan-03-12  notyetagm: Game Collection: JOSEKI: ENEMY KING MAKES A GREAT SECOND TARGET
Jan-03-12  notyetagm: Game Collection: JOSEKI: ENEMY KING MAKES A GREAT SECOND TARGET


click for larger view

Nov-06-13  Jim Bartle: <bartonlaos> "Oh, my goodness ... 106 pages on THIS game?? What's makes this interesting at all - there's not even a debate!"

Well, the first 96 pages are kibitzes <during> the game, a very long and complex game in a WC match.

Nov-06-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Wow. Eight years since this game was played in San Luis.

What made it so exceptional is the circus move 19 Nc4 leading not to some decision either way, but to a further positional exchange sacrifice on move 22 which was unclear for 30 moves.

Of all the games in the tournament, I think this draw really shocked the other competitors, as it showed Topalov was capable of another level of chess.

May-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Had Topalov won this game (as he should have), he would have finished the first half of the tournament with an absolutely insane 7-0 score. Not that his 6.5/7 was too shabby, mind you.
May-22-14  Chessinfinite: Yes, Fantastic game by both players- game for the ages. Topalov played brilliantly and got a winning position, and to be fair Anand also defended brilliantly for the most part, but could not keep up under pressure from Topalov. Both players did well and also made numerous mistakes, and the last mistake came from Topalov to draw a winning endgame.

Here is an introduction to this incredible game in the detailed analysis by GMs as given in a book on Sanluis 2005 by Alik Gershon, Igor Stohl :

< Topalov vs Anand featured a uniquely dramatic battle. The Bulgarian faced one of his main contenders for the title. He chose a relatively quiet line of the Queen's Indian. This choice was especially surprising as not long ago Topalov, against the same opponent, opted for a much riskier approach, emerging victorious after a brilliant game. The initial stage of the game was well known to Anand, who is not only the World's leading expert on the black side of this line, but has also employed this variation with White on numerous occasions. He, therefore, chose the safest (to his mind) continuation. The point of which is that White is practically forced into sacrificing an exchange for the initiative, but black has good chances to withstand it.

Topalov stepped up to the challenge with great enthusiasm, uncorking a novelty in his favourite style- for a fight. From here on it was one big illusion, as many spectators mistakenly counted the game as all Topalov's achievement, alloying Anand the role of a supporting actor. In reality, Anand reacted well and could have forced a draw. It was due to his doubts (on two occasions , as the situation was repeated later in the game) whether it was worth playing for a win and how to do it, that he erred and found himself in difficult positions, and even a lost one in the ending.

Topalov has to be credited for exploiting his chances, and for a correct psychological line: Anand was tearing himself apart between choosing a draw (from a superior position) with black or taking risks while playing for a win.

In the end, Topalov needed just a little more effort to win, but something unpredictable occurred: Topalov lost his way!. It could be seen by the time he spent on every move, and his inaccuracies. The game ended in a split point, although on the way Anand failed twice to force a draw, and Topalov did not use his chances. It was a tough struggle for both, and a great delight for spectators. >

Jun-23-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  Zhbugnoimt: 82.f5+? draws according to the tablebase RandomVisitor.
Aug-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  dernier loup de T: Hard to believe 82.f5+ would NOT win, Zhbugnoimt!! Specially when two humans are playing one against other....
Apr-02-18  Ironmanth: Intense game!
Apr-02-18  Howard: The, excellent, tournament book mentions a forced win that Topalov missed near the end of the game, but also concedes that no human player would have been able to find it---only a computer would have been capable.
Apr-02-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Check It Out: This is a great game and one of my favorite puns, working on at least three levels.
Apr-02-18  dumbgai: I remember this game when it happened. It was the only game Topalov failed to win in the first half of the tournament, as he scored 6.5/7 against the other 7 opponents. And he was close to a win here, which would have given him an astonishing 7/7.
Dec-11-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Still the best pun ever. Simple and precise.
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