chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Hans Jack Berliner vs Sven Elias Almgren
47th US Open (1946), Pittsburgh, PA USA, rd 3, Jul-09
French Defense: Classical. Steinitz Variation (C11)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 127 more games of Berliner
sac: 21.Kh1 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-12-18  stacase: Great Wednesday puzzle. Maybe a little too easy. Having the 2nd Rook waiting to get in on the party was really sweet (-:
Dec-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  drollere: 32. Qxh6+ gxh6
33. g7+ Kxg7
34. Nh5+ Kh8
35. Rxh6#
when in doubt, sac the queen.
Dec-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  PawnSac: a beautiful Q sac !
Dec-12-18  ChessHigherCat: Qsac Wednesday. Spectacular but it seems a little easier than usual since it's all forced:

32. Qxh6+ gxh6 33. g7+ Kxg7 34. Nh5+ Kh8 35. Rxh6#

Dec-12-18  jith1207: Rarely, I have spotted the combination instantly in a couple of seconds after seeing the position. Pattern recognition, I guess. That for a Wednesday puzzle variety.

<stacase>: wouldn't this forced combination have worked just the same without the other rook in g1 as well?

Dec-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White is one pawn down.

Black threatens Nxf6.

White can deliver mate with 32.Qxh6+ gxh6 33.g7+ Kxg7 34.Nh5+ Kh8 35.Rxh6#.

Dec-12-18  saturn2: I took 32. Nf5

32...Qe5 33. Qxh6+ gxh6 34. g7+ Kh7 35. Rxh6#

32..Nxf6 33. Qxh6+ gxh6 34. g7+ Kh7 35. Nxd6+ Bf5 36. Bxf5#

32..Qf4 33. Rxe6 plus puece

Dec-12-18  ChessHigherCat: If history repeats itself, now that we've made the mistake of complaining about Wednesday being too easy, tomorrow we'll be treated to "AlphaZero's Immortal", the amazing mate-in-36!
Dec-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  OrangeTulip: Screaming for a queen sac
Dec-12-18  AlicesKnight: It looks like mate in 4; 32.Qxh6+ forces ...gxh6; 33.g7+ Kxg7; 34.Nh5+ (the key to success, supporting the Rf6).... Kh8; 35.Rxh6. Let's see .... yup.
Dec-12-18  goodevans: Stockfish reckons <23...Ne3> is losing and gives instead <23...g6 24. fxg6 N6e5> as equal.

I agree. Looking at that position I wouldn't want to play either side!

Dec-12-18  cocker: Ich bin ein Berliner!
Dec-12-18  gofer: <32 Nf5 ...>

White threatens 33 Qxh6+ gxh6+ 34 g7+ Kh7 35 Rh6#, but also threatens Nxd6 winning the queen, so black only has two sensible defences..

32 ... Qf4
33 Rxe6 +-

Black's options are very limited!

<32 ... Bxf5>
<33 Rxf5 ...>

White probably cannot take the queen as Bxe4+ seems to make white's job much harder. Simply taking the bishop continues the attack and forces black to either lose the knight or move it...

<HOLD IT ONE MINUTE... ...all the above might not be necessary!!!>

<32 Qxh6+ gxh6+>

<33 g7+ Kxg7>

<34 Nh5+! Kh8>

<35 Rxh6#>

MUCH SIMPLER!!!!

~~~

It seems I am the only one that looked at the wrong solution before seeing the right one... Doh!

Dec-12-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  malt: a Nice Queen sac
Dec-12-18  Walter Glattke: I like 32.Nf5 Qd8!? (BxN, RxQ) 33.Qxh6+ gxh6 34.g7+ Kh7 35.Rxh6#
Dec-12-18  Mayankk: Not too difficult but still feels good to spot it. Especially once you notice how strong Nh5+ is after Kxg7. Nice puzzle.
Dec-12-18  patzer2: WhenI see the possibility of a double discovered check, no matter what the material cost in sacrificed material, I can't resist calculating it.

In today's Wednesday (32. ?) puzzle, I was initially drawn to the double discovered check 32. Qxh6!! gxh6 33. g7+ Kxg7 34. Nf5+??, but after 34...Kxf6 35. Nxd6 Ke5 -+ (-15.26 @ 24 ply, Stockfish 9) Black turns the tables and wins.

Only after exhausting that possibility did I consider the winning follow-up 34. Nh5+! +-, which completes the mate-in-four combination solving today's Wednesday puzzle with 34...Kh8 35. Rxh6#.

P.S.: So where did Black go wrong? According to the computer, Black's decisive mistake was 22...Ra7?, potentially allowing 23. g6! Qd6 (23...hxg6 24. fxg6 +-) 24. Bf4 +- (+1.93 @ 31 ply, Stockfish 9).

Instead, 22...Ra6! 23. f6 N6e5 24. fxg7 Rxf1+ 25. Qxf1 d3 26. h3 Kxg7 27. Bf4 Qd4 ⩲ to = (+0.28 @ 32 ply, Stockfish 9) gives Black good counter chances.

Earlier, Black had the advantage but missed an opportunity to capitalize on it with the immediate piece capture 20...exd4 ∓ (-1.24 @ 34 ply, Stockfish 9).

Dec-12-18  stacase: <jith1207:<stacase>: wouldn't this forced combination have worked just the same without the other rook in g1 as well?>

Now that you point it out, yes it would. Once you see the forced route to checkmate, there's no point to looking any further. And I didn't.

Thanks for commenting on my post, compared to the political forums I haunt this corner of the web is quite noncommittal.

Dec-12-18  patzer2: <gofer> <It seems I am the only one that looked at the wrong solution before seeing the right one... Doh!> You're not alone. I chased the losing rabbit 34. Nf5+ ?? before seeing 34. Nh5+ forcing 34...Kh8 35. Rxh6#.

At least the alternative you initially calculated with 32. Nf5 +- (+11.52 @ 32 ply, Stockfish 9) is winning, albeit with more difficulty than the mate-in-four forced with 32. Qxh6+!

Dec-12-18  catlover: I tried to find the solution using 32. Nf5.

How about 32. Nf5 Nxf6 33. Qxh6+ gxh6 34. g7+ Kh7 35. Nxd6+ Nxe4 36. g7xR=N+ Kh7 37. Rg8#

Dec-12-18  Ceri: <patzer2: <gofer> At least the alternative you initially calculated with 32. Nf5 +- (+11.52 @ 32 ply, Stockfish 9) is winning, albeit with more difficulty than the mate-in-four forced with 32. Qxh6+!>

Stockfish 10 at 38 ply had 32. Nf5 as +66.46!

Cheers,

Ceri

Dec-12-18  patzer2: <Ceri> Thanks! Looks like I will need to update my SCID vs PC database from Stockfish 9 to Stockfish 10.
Dec-12-18  landshark: Like many of you, I saw the solution to today's puzzle quicker and easier than the last two 'easier' days. In defense of those tougher 'easier' puzzles, I'll just say that they are a lot more like real positions I'd likely see OTB than this beautiful tactical blow in such a wild position.
Dec-12-18  ChessHigherCat: <landshark>: If even I can see it in 5 seconds, it's too easy for a Wednesday, although I'm not saying it was uninteresting or not instructive.

It must be time-consuming and challenging to choose problems of the right difficulty for each day of the week. What do you think of my idea of awarding a lifetime membership to one of the many master CG members to choose the GOTD. I don't think that's excessively generous since an annual membership fee is only $35 or so, which isn't even a decent hourly wage. Plus, since the GOTD is a major attraction to most visitors of the site, having a properly calibrated puzzle would increase overall revenues by recruiting new members/preventing defection.

Dec-13-18  Ceri: Stockfish 9 claimed mate in 40 for 32. Nf5 at 38 ply and settled down to mate in 34 at 45 ply
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
French Def: Classical. Steinitz (C11) 1-0 Reinfeld puzzle 32.?
from Hammer the 3rd/6th some more by fredthebear
1946 US Open, Pittsburgh, PA
by RonB52734
French Def: Classical. Steinitz (C11) 1-0 Reinfeld puzzle 32.?
from Cut-ups in French Commercials by fredthebear
32 ? (Wednesday, December 12)
from Puzzle of the Day 2018 by Phony Benoni
32. Qxh6+! solves Wednesday Dec 12, 2018
from Mate-in-four by patzer2
32 ? (December 12, 2018)
from Wednesday Puzzles, 2018-2021 by Phony Benoni
32. Qxh6+! solves Wednesday Dec 12, 2018
from Mate-in-four by trh6upsz
Tactics - 1
by obrit
Pawn pressure
from jjh's favorite games by jjh
Checkmate 1940-1949
by Chessdreamer
32 ? (Wednesday, December 12)
from POTD French 3 by takchess
lesser known games and masters
by bengalcat47
Classical. Steinitz Variation
from MKD's French Defense by MKD

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC