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Vladimir Kramnik vs Veselin Topalov
"And Then There Was One" (game of the day Mar-10-2019)
Kramnik - Topalov World Championship Match (2006) (rapid), Elista RUS, rd 16, Oct-13
Semi-Slav Defense: Meran Variation (D47)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 17 times; par: 65 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 16 OF 17 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Mar-10-09  WhiteRook48: why is this won?
Mar-30-09  WhiteRook48: because 45 Rb7+ never mind
Sep-12-09  WhiteRook48: but it's still a blunder
Dec-12-09  easternthoughts: after Rxc5, ...Rb7+, black would have to take the rook on b7 and then white would play ...Rxc5+ Kb6, ...axb7 and black would have to take the pawn and be a rook down or white would promote
Mar-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Golden Executive: Up to now, no engines can save the game for black at 44. If im wrong please let me know.
Mar-30-10  Wrong: <Golden Executive:> Up to now, no engines can save the game for black at 44. If im <<wrong>> please let me know.

===
after white's 44th move, i believed white is already ahead.

here the engine evaluation after white's 44th move:

Vladimir Kramnik - Veselin Topalov, Kramnik-Topalov World Championship Match 2006


click for larger view

Analysis by Deep Fritz 8:

1. (1.75): 44...e6-e5 45.Bf1-e2 Bg6-f5 46.g2-g3 h7-h5 47.Rb6-b3 g7-g5 48.h2-h4 g5xh4 49.g3xh4 Bf5-e6 50.Rb3-b4 f7-f5 2. (1.92): 44...Rc2-c1 45.Bf1-e2 Rc1-c3+ 46.Ke3-d2 Rc3-c2+ 47.Kd2-d1 h7-h6 48.h2-h4 Bg6-f5 49.g2-g4 Bf5-h7 50.Ra5-b5 Ra7-a8 51.f3-f4 Ra8-d8+

you can see white is already ahead.
===

so probably you are not <wrong>.

=)

Mar-30-10  Atking: Kramnik in Karpov mood, building advantage after another. Always a pleasure to look.
Mar-30-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Golden Executive: Hey Mr <Wrong> please excuse me for trying to usurp. Now you resolved my identity issue. Seems like im not <wrong>. Thanks for your <psycho>analysis
Mar-31-10  Wrong: maybe you should look here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrong

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dict...

http://thesaurus.com/browse/wrong

http://dictionary.reference.com/bro...

http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/

http://lesswrong.com/

http://www.wrongobject.com/

May-10-10  acirce: It's been 3 years. How would the chess world have looked today if this one single rapid game had ended 0-1 instead of 1-0?
Nov-15-10  talisman: a whole lot worse...
Nov-16-10  Pencho: That was the time Topa played his best chess..Sadly he failled to win the title that in my opinion he deserved.

If we don't count the 5th game it woudl've been 3:2 for Kramnik.However it should've been 3:2 for Topa..

It's all about game two - first Topalov missed the win after Kramnik's 31st move, then he missed a forced draw and ended up loosing a game he should've won.

Realy sad story.

Oct-24-11  AnalyzeThis: Not really. The better player won.
Jan-08-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Topalov, 2006

Game Collection: FORCING MOVES SHOW YOU WHERE THE PIECES *REALLY* 44 ... Rc2xc5?? does not remove guard due to 45 Rb6-b7+! 1-0

Jan-08-13  notyetagm: Kramnik vs Topalov, 2006

Game Collection: FORCING MOVES SHOW YOU WHERE PIECES *REALLY* ARE 44 ... Rc2xc5?? does not remove guard due to 45 Rb6-b7+! 1-0

Jan-08-13  jussu: One think keeps puzzling me: Topalov had this same "obvious" blunder available on move 43, but instead he firs gave that strange check, driving white king to a move active square, and only then grabbed the pawn. I mean if Rxc5 actually didn't blunder the rook, would you prefer 43... Rxc5 or 43... Rc2+?
Jan-08-13  notyetagm: <jussu: One think keeps puzzling me: Topalov had this same "obvious" blunder available on move 43, but instead he firs gave that strange check, driving white king to a move active square, and only then grabbed the pawn. I mean if Rxc5 actually didn't blunder the rook, would you prefer 43... Rxc5 or 43... Rc2+?>

Good point. But as a big Topalov supporter at the time, I clearly remember Topalov's play be marred by several horrible ?? moves.

Dec-29-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: 21...Nxc3?? forks the White rooks, but after 22.Bxe7+ White is winning.
May-18-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <jussu: One think keeps puzzling me: Topalov had this same "obvious" blunder available on move 43, but instead he firs gave that strange check, driving white king to a move active square, and only then grabbed the pawn. I mean if Rxc5 actually didn't blunder the rook, would you prefer 43... Rxc5 or 43... Rc2+?>

That is a brilliant observation!

Watch this for a real oddity:

Two years earlier Kramnik is playing Leko in the last game, the 14th game, of the Kramnik - Leko World Championship Match (2004). He is losing 2-1 and needs a win to draw the match and retain his title. It is sort of similar to this game: a final crunch game that decides the title.

Here is what I wrote about this position, which appeared after Kramnik as white played 34.f4!


click for larger view

Kramnik vs Leko, 2004

<Leko analyses that he can't take the d-pawn, so what does he do? 34... Ra2+ 35.Kf3 Ra3+ 36.Kg4. And now, having chased the king into the centre of the board, he resumes his attack on the d-pawn!


click for larger view

36...Rd3. As if the attack might work *now* - now that the white king is so much better placed.>

I think that is a strange coincidence that in two final games both challengers made a pointless rook check.

Mar-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: It was a great match. I don't know if anyone thought VK was going to come back from a point down due to the forfeit for leaving the playing area too many times.

I was wondering why a player of Topalov's caliber would make the exchanges that would leave him uncastled and behind in development.

Mar-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: It is very good that today's GotD title is by <rcs784>. I looked at his page and saw that he has been a member <since Mar-07-09>.

Ten whole years, imagine!

Mar-10-19  Kirth Gersen: I feel like Offramp is perpetrating some of his occasionally-impenetrable humor here. But this is a pretty good byline for the game, recalling the title unification that I think was very good for chess, however people side on the old Kramnik-Topalov hatefest. And the final position is a nicely compact illustration of the poor King's inability to dance at 2 weddings (on b8 and c5).
Mar-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: I remember Toiletgate clearly. Kramnik went to the toilet 106 times in 106 minutes, resembling one of those chase sequences in Scooby-Doo.

The people who sided with Topalov in the scandal tended to be Bulgarian loners and Flat-earthers.

People on Kramnik's side tended to be university graduates in full-time employment with stable families who gave frequently to charity and were fluent in more than one language and had all their own teeth.

I was sort of in the middle..

Mar-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Korora: The pun's a reference to Agatha Christie's psychological horror masterpiece, I suppose?
Mar-10-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  offramp: <Korora: The pun's a reference to Agatha Christie's psychological horror masterpiece, I suppose?>

Could be. The Christie book has about 5 titles, two of which are no longer printable.

I played a French computer game based on the Christie novel and it was indeed called... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agath... <And Then There Were None>.

The title refers to how many people enjoyed the game.

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