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Vladimir Kramnik vs Loek van Wely
Corus Group A (2001), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 2, Jan-14
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange. Modern Exchange Variation (D85)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Feb-14-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Benzol: <suenteus po 147> In this game was White's 30th move 30.♘b5? Maybe it was 30.♘d5.

[Event "Corus"]
[Site "Wijk aan Zee, NED"]
[Date "2001.01.14"]
[EventDate "?"]
[Round "2"]
[Result "1-0"]
[White "Vladimir Kramnik"]
[Black "Van Wely, Loek"]
[ECO "D85"]
[WhiteElo "2772"]
[BlackElo "2700"]
[PlyCount "66"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 g6 3.Nc3 d5 4.Nf3 Bg7
5.cxd5 Nxd5 6.e4 Nxc3 7.bxc3 c5 8.Be3 Qa5
9.Qd2 Nc6 10.Rc1 cxd4 11.cxd4 Qxd2+ 12.Kxd2 O-O
13.d5 Rd8 14.Ke1 Na5 15.Bg5 Bd7 16.Bd3 Rdc8
17.Ke2 e6 18.Be3 exd5 19.exd5 b6 20.Ba6 Rd8
21.Rhd1 Bc8 22.Bxc8 Raxc8 23.Rxc8 Rxc8 24.Nd4 Bf8
25.Nb5 a6 26.d6 Rc2+ 27.Kd3 Rxa2 28.d7 Nb7
29.Nc3 Rb2 30.Nb5 Rb5 31.Kc2 Bc5 32.Bh6 f6
33.Nc7 1-0

Feb-15-07  nescio: <Benzol> It definitely was 30.Nd5. Well spotted.

[Event "Wijk aan Zee"]
[Site ""]
[Date "2001.??.??"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Kramnik, Vladimir"]
[Black "Van Wely, Loek"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteTitle "IGM"]
[BlackTitle "IGM"]
[WhiteElo "2772"]
[BlackElo "2700"]
[NIC "GI 4.9.6"]
[ECO "D85"]
[PlyCount "65"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Be3 Qa5 9. Qd2 Nc6 10. Rc1 cxd4 11. cxd4 Qxd2 12. Kxd2 O-O 13. d5 Rd8 14. Ke1 Na5 15. Bg5 Bd7 16. Bd3 Rdc8 17. Ke2 e6 18. Be3 exd5 19. exd5 b6 20. Ba6 Rd8 21. Rhd1 Bc8 22. Bxc8 Raxc8 23. Rxc8 Rxc8 24. Nd4 Bf8 25. Nb5 a6 26. d6 Rc2 27. Kd3 Rxa2 28. d7 Nb7 29. Nc3 Rb2 30. Nd5 Rb5 31. Kc2 Bc5 32. Bh6 f6 33. Nc7 1-0

Feb-15-07  suenteus po 147: <Benzol> It looks like <nescio> beat me to it. Yes, 30.Nd5 was the move played in the game for certain. I was entering the moves in manually (!) and must have mistyped it. I do my best to proofread before submitting, but I seem to miss more than I catch.
Feb-15-07  nescio: <suenteus po 147: It looks like <nescio> beat me to it.>

I think <Benzol> posted when you were sleeping:)

<I do my best to proofread before submitting, but I seem to miss more than I catch>

When you type all those moves little mistakes are unavoidable. I should know, proofreading is a part of my work. Perhaps a program like the one <chessgames.com> are using is downloadable somewhere. Then you can feed the pgn in the program before submitting. It may even be possible to enter the moves on a chessboard in the program. That would be an even better guarantee against improbable moves in the pgn.

Jan-12-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Where went van Wely wrong and why did Kramnik not play <24.d6> ?


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Jan-12-08  acirce: Right after the game Kramnik pointed at 19..b6?, 24..Bf8? (24..Bxd4 25.Rxd4 f6 26.Kd3 Kf7 27.g4 "and, despite the clear White advantage, Black may still be able to hold the draw due to the lack of material") and finally 27..Rxa2? (27..Rc6!? although Black is at least close to being lost anyway). About 32.Bh6: "Other moves were winning too, but I was going for mate!"

26.d6! is remarkable. If 26..axb5 White wins by 27.d7 Rd8 28.Bxb6 Nc6 29.Bxd8 Nxd8 30.Rd5 threatening both Re5-e8 and Rxb5.

18.Be3 was probably from Kramnik's preparation for the Kasparov match, having been played just a couple of months earlier, but soon afterwards he switched to 18.Rxc8+ in Kramnik vs Kasparov, 2001

Feb-22-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  plang: In this theoretical line 16 Bxe7..Re8 17 d6..Nc6 would have helped Black. Shortly after this game 16..f5 was introduced which has scored well for Black. 18 Bd2 had been played a few times prior to this game but makes little sense as after 18..exd 19 exd (19 Bxa5..dxe 20 Bxe4..Re8 is strong for Black) 19..Re8+ the bishop has to go to e3 anyway; Kramnik's 18 Be3 is clearly stronger. 19..b6!? was criticized by some for allowing White control of the c-file but Van Wely repeated the move a few months later in a win against Piket where he played the improvement 21..Ba4 (rather than the passive 21..Bc8?! as in this game). The overeager alternative 24 d6..Nb7 25 d7..Rd8 26 Bf4..Nc5 would have shown how quickly the d-pawn could become a weakness rather than a strength. Kramnik thought that 24..Bf8? might have been the only real mistake in the game.

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