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Vladimir Kramnik vs Alexander Grischuk
World Championship Tournament (2007), Mexico City MEX, rd 4, Sep-16
Catalan Opening: Closed Variation (E06)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 24 OF 24 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-16-07  DDR: Grischuk is also a well known as a poker player- some related skills definately helped him today.

Great opening preparation by Kramnik and nice try. Kramnik surprises very pleasnatly in this tournament in terms of enthusiasm and energy to play.

Sep-17-07  samikd: Can somebody explain why Kramnik didn't play <48. Bd1> ?
Sep-17-07  Aspirador: Probably 48.Bd1 Kc3 and after a line like 49.e3 Nc2 50.Bxc2 Kxc2 Black attacks the white pawns just as fast as White.
Sep-17-07  Rodrigo Gutierrez: <DDR: One needs to remember that Grischuk almost always gets into time trouble, but he is also one of the best if not the best blitz player in the world.>

I didn't know that, but he sure showed his skills in this game!

Sep-17-07  percyblakeney: Very impressively blitzed by Grischuk, I think he had 2 minutes for a dozen moves in an inferior and complicated position, but managed to reach an endgame that turned out to be drawable.
Sep-17-07  Microdot: In my opinion Kramnik's advantage in this game was much more than Anand's advantage against my all time favorite morozevich, this is because if Kramnik
played 38.Qa4! after 38...Rxa5 39.Qxa5,Rxc5 40.dxc5,Nd4 41.Bf3! was a very easy technical win for white But in Anand VS morozevich game the convert of advantage was much more difficult because of 2R+2B VS 2R+2B is very hard positions especially against Big MOROZEVICH!!

Sep-17-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Stonehenge: Grischuk used too much time on 16...Nd5. That was an easy one, I thought.
Sep-17-07  percyblakeney: It was 5 minutes Grischuk had left for the last dozen moves before the time control, with four moves left he was down to 37 seconds.
Sep-17-07  Hesam7: This does not look good for Kramnik at all, he used to win this type of games.

In all of his 4 games up to now Kramnik has been able to get an advantage after the opening but has converted it in only one game. Against this high level of opponents you do not get this type of chances every day.

Sep-17-07  cotdt: Why don't you guys try playing perfect chess for 5 hours straight. Your brain will freeze before the 2nd hour.
Sep-17-07  euripides: It looks as if Kramnik has twice played inaccurately in his opponents' time trouble - here and against Morozevich. An old mistake, but not one I would have expected from Kramnik.
Sep-17-07  Atkins: <Hesam7: This does not look good for Kramnik at all, he used to win this type of games. In all of his 4 games up to now Kramnik has been able to get an advantage after the opening but has converted it in only one game. Against this high level of opponents you do not get this type of chances every day.> Agree... but indeed it seems that Kramnik got consistently an advantage from the opening. That's not good for the others... There is another argument on this site that Kramnik played 3 times with White in 4 games. Ok Anand played 2 times. So only one game with the advantage of the first move as a difference. The next Anand play White and Kramnik black then boths will have played 3 times white. Not a big difference. I worried a bit too about the last game that Kramnik should have win easily. But you can say the same for Anand. Still Kramnik was never in difficulty. Anand got an inferior position against Gelfand (With White!) Simply there is a lot of psychological pressure on these players.
Sep-17-07  euripides: ... on reflection perhaps 38.Qa4 wasn't all the clear either e.g. 38...Rxa5 39.Qxa5 Nxd4 40.Rxh5 gxh5 41.Qxh5 doesn't look completely trivial.

Kramnik had a long think before move 50, when I was expecting 50.Kg4 - does this or <JointheArmy>'s 50.Bg8 work ?

Sep-17-07  euripides: I see from chesspro that the line <38.Qa4 (actually they give Qxa2) Rxa5 39.Qxa5 Nxd4 40.Rxh5 gxh5> fails to 41.Qg5+ winning the knight.

Perhaps Kramnik got too interested in the B vs N endgame.

Sep-17-07  Whack8888: <cotdt> my brain actually freezes after the first hour--my, but what a first hour I have!
Sep-17-07  djmercury: <Agree... but indeed it seems that Kramnik got consistently an advantage from the opening> Morozevich and Grishuk allowed him to play his pet Catalan, while Anand allowed him to play his favourite defence against e4 as it was expected. In fact the only one that played a surprise opening, Svidler, usually going for the Grünfeld against d4, has had the less trouble against him.
Sep-17-07  Atkins: <euripides: I see from chesspro that the line <38.Qa4 (actually they give Qxa2) Rxa5 39.Qxa5 Nxd4 40.Rxh5 gxh5> fails to 41.Qg5+ winning the knight. Perhaps Kramnik got too interested in the B vs N endgame.> Yes on another site they say that Ribka gives +1.6 on 38.Qa4 Still we have to see the moves after 40...Qb1+ (Instead of 40...gxRh5 41.Qg5+ winning the N with Qf6+ or Qc5+) 41.Bf1 Nxe2+ 42.Kg2 Qb7+ 43.f3 Nd4 as confusing intermezzo. I suggested during the game the simple 37.RxRh5 NxRa2 38.Rc5 Nb4 39.Rxa5 Nc2 40.RxRa7 NxQa1 41.Ra8 with an ending like the game but with a pawn up connected (d4 Instead of c5) which must be an easy win in the hand of Kramnik.
Sep-17-07  acirce: Yes, 38.Qa2 may be better in practical terms since it stops 38..Qb1+ 39.Bf1 Rxh2!? nonsense and while White does win there's a bit to calculate to make sure.

Still, while 38.Qa2 Rxa5 39.Qxa5 Rxc5 40.dxc5 is clear, 39..Nxd4 40.Rxh5 Qb1+ 41.Bf1 Nxe2+ 42.Kg2 Qe4+ 43.f3 Qe3 is another trick but White has more than one way to win here.

Kramnik: <The question is how many wins did I miss? 5, or maybe 7. So of course it is a big disappointment for me that I did not win this game.> Grischuk agreed: <...at some point I started to play really badly. Then I was lost, even after the time control, but somehow I survived.> http://main.uschess.org/content/vie...

Sep-17-07  Ezzy: Kramnik (2811) - Grischuk (2732) [E05]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.g3 d5 4.Bg2 Be7 5.Nf3 0–0 6.0–0 dxc4 7.Qc2 a6 8.Qxc4 b5 9.Qc2 Bb7 10.Bd2 Ra7 11.a3 <Kramnik again comes up with a move to get your opponent thinking>. 11...Nbd7<Novelty. 11,,,Be4 was the previous preferred choice.> 12.Ba5 Qa8< Looks like a 'Fritz' move> 13.Qxc7< Grischuk's active rook will get the pawn back> 13...Rc8 14.Qf4 Rc2 15.Nbd2 Rxb2 16.Rfc1 Nd5 17.Qe4 b4 <There is a nice tactical threat here of 18...Rxd2 19 Nxd2 Nc3 20 Qd3 Bxg2 which looks ok for black>. 18.Qd3 <Kramnik is not allowing that>. 18...bxa3 19.Nc4 Bc6 20.Nxa3 Bb5 21.Nc4 Bb4 22.Qd1 Bxc4 23.Rxc4 Bxa5 24.Rxa5 Qb8 25.Nd2 N5b6 26.Rc1 g6 27.Ne4 Rb5 28.Ra2 a5 29.Nc5 Qd6 30.Nb7 Qb8 31.Qd3 Rh5 32.Nc5 Nd5 <Aiming for the fork on b4> 33.Qc4 N5b6 <A lot of jostling for position going on.> 34.Qc3 Nd5 35.Qa1 Nxc5 36.Rxc5 Nb4 <A better line could be [36...Nf6 37.Raxa5 Rxa5 38.Qxa5 Qb1+ Now black has this move, where as with the 36,,,Nb4 move he doesn't. 39.Bf1 Rxh2! 40.Kxh2 Qxf1 and a draw]> 37.Raxa5 Nc2 38.Rxa7< [38.Qa2 Commentators say this would of retained winning chances]> 38...Nxa1 39.Ra8 Qxa8 40.Bxa8 Rxc5 41.dxc5 Kf8 42.c6 Ke7 43.c7 Kd7 44.Bc6+ Kxc7 45.Ba4 Kb6 46.Kg2 Kc5 47.Kf3 Kb4 48.Be8 f6 49.Bf7 Nb3 50.e3 <Kramnik's last chance was probably 50 Bg8 [50.Bg8 h6 51.Bf7 g5 52.Kg4 Nc5 53.Kh5 Kc3 54.Kxh6 Kd2 55.Bh5 Ke1 56.Kg6 f5 57.Kxg5 Kxf2 58.g4 fxg4 59.Bxg4 Looks pretty good to me. Shame that Kramnik didn’t win the endgame, it would have been another triumph for the rampaging Catalan bishop.> 50...Nc5 51.h4 Kc3 52.Bg8 h6 53.Bf7 g5 54.Kg4 Ne4 55.hxg5 hxg5 56.Bxe6 Nxf2+ 57.Kf5 Kd3 58.Kxf6 Ne4+ ½–½

Close shave for Grischuk, but I still think he’s the best of the ‘outsiders’ so far. He was willing to mix it with Kramnik in his favorite opening.

For Kramnik to say he missed quite a few winning chances just goes to show how difficult these positions can be. Credit to Grischuk for a good fighting save of the game.

Sep-17-07  Resignation Trap: In the era of adjourned games, a Botvinnik would have probably found a win for White, but Kramnik was unable to do so with our modern time controls. A second consecutive down-to the-wire endgame draw was all that he could get.
Sep-17-07  you vs yourself: Maybe this could explain his missed win

<Kramnik: “My problem quite often has been the fifth, sixth hour, when I was missing victories and I was making mistakes, probably due to tiredness. To combat this, prior to the match against Topalov, Kramnik undertook a special training, every day for one whole month. “After analyzing with my trainer for four, five hours certain openings or variations I would try solving chess studies”.> http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

Sep-17-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Resignation Trap> From today published Kramnik DVD promotion report:

"On this DVD Kramnik also talks about a fifth-hour weakness in his game. Here’s how Kramnik described the situation: “My problem quite often has been the fifth, sixth hour, when I was missing victories and I was making mistakes, probably due to tiredness. To combat this, prior to the match against Topalov, Kramnik undertook a special training, every day for one whole month. “After analyzing with my trainer for four, five hours certain openings or variations I would try solving chess studies,” he recalls. At the end of the training period he found that he had been quite successful in ironing out his fifth-hour weakness! Apparently he solved close to 1,000 studies during the entire one-month period."

mock mock...
http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

Sep-17-07  Resignation Trap: Grischuk arrived a bit late for this game: http://www.chesspro.ru/_images/mate... .
Feb-06-11  Hesam7: After 50. Bg8!:


click for larger view

Now Stockfish 2.0.1 gives the following @ <depth 40>:

50. ... h6 51. Bf7 Nd4+ 52. Ke3 Kc5 53. Bxg6 Nc6 54. Bd3 Ne5 55. h3 Kd6 56. f4 Nd7 57. Kf3 Ke7 58. g4 e5 59. e3 Nc5 60. Bf5 Kf8 61. Ke2 Ke7 62. h4 Nb7 63. Be4 Nc5 64. Bc2 exf4 65. exf4 Ne6 66. Ke3 Kf7 67. Bf5 <+2.26>.

Feb-06-11  Hesam7: Another interesting question would be if 51. Bg8 would still win. After: 51. ... h6 52. Bf7 Black can play 52. ... Nd3!


click for larger view

And although I think White can win this but the win is far from obvious ...

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