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Teimour Radjabov vs Viswanathan Anand
Corus Group A (2008), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 1, Jan-12
Semi-Slav Defense: Anti-Moscow Gambit (D44)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-13-08  notyetagm: <Ezzy: ... and Radjabov outplays Anand in brilliant fashion from opening to middle game to endgame. Fantastic endgame technique from Radjabov. Hes really on song at the moment! What a start to the tournament for the young guns.>

I totally agree, this was a -stupendous- effort by Radjabov, from beginning to end.

To paraphrase Alekhine, in this game Radjabov beat Anand three times: in the opening, middlegame, and endgame.

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: <Kaspablanca: In this ending it looks like Radjabov will have a two pawn advantage for the return of the exchange.>

Exactly how you win an ending up an exchange: you give -back- the exchange to simplify into a won ending.

Like you said, here Radjabov (White) prepares to give back the exchange in order to simplify into a rook ending in which he has a pair of extra connected passed pawns, an easy win.

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: Final position after 85 ♔e7-f6 1-0:


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The final position shows Radjabov's excellent endgame technique:

1) Attack the weakest point in the Black position, the <PAWN CHAIN BASE>, the Black e6-pawn. Radjabov attacks this weakness with all three of his pieces: White d6-rook, e1-rook, and f6-king.

2) Penetrate on the <DARK SQUARES>. The light-squared Black d5-bishop allows Black to create a fortress on the light squares so Radjabov penetrates on the <DARK SQUARES>. Note how fittingly in the final position every one of White's pieces resides on a <DARK SQUARE>: d6, f6, and e1.

3) Prepare to <RETURN THE EXCHANGE> by trading on the e6-square in order to simplify into an easily winning two-pawn up rook ending.

4) Note how Radjabov used his rooks to <SHIELD> his king as it advanced up the board and <DEFEND> his pawns.

I, like a kibitzer above, thought that was game was a draw around move 75, thinking that Anand would not allow the penetration on the <DARK SQUARES> to his <PAWN CHAIN BASE> on e6 that we see above in the final position, but Radjabov's magnificent play allowed him to accomplish the strategic goals that he needed to win this excellent endgame.

-Tremendous- win by Radjabov, from beginning to end, marred only by his missing several outright wins in the runup to the time control due to time pressure.

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: <Ezzy: ... 36.Ra7< What a strong position for Radjabov. He has completely outplayed Anand in the opening and middle game.>>


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Jan-13-08  notyetagm: Game Collection: Grooming pawns for promotion -- Seirawan

Radjabov vs Anand, 2008

Position after 40 d6-d7:


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<Ezzy: ... 40.d7 <The pressure forces Anand to lose the exchange. Strong play from young Radjabov.>>

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: Radjabov vs Anand, 2008

From http://www.coruschess.com/report.ph...:

<Possibly Vishy overlooked or underestimated 23.e5!>


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<The pawn was immune, as after 23Qxe5 24.Ba6>


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<or 23Nxe5 24. axb4 axb4 25.Nc5 black is just dead.>


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So Radjabov's 23 e4-e5! is a -tremendous- tactical shot. Even thought it looks as if the White e5-pawn has two attackers versus zero defenders, this is not really so.

The Black f6-queen cannot capture the White e5-pawn because it will not be <SAFE> on e5; it will be a <MISPLACED PIECE (L[A]TE)> that is lined up with the White e1-rook allowing the <DISCOVERY> 24 ♗e2-a6.

And the Black d7-knight cannot capture the White e5-pawn because 23 ... ♘d7xe5? hands the c5-square over to the White a4-knight (25 ♘a4-c5 ), resulting in a winning position for White.

<<<<<So because 23 ... ♕f6xe5? leads to the Black queen not being safe and 23 ... ♘d7xe5? leaves behind (weakens) the c5-square, Black cannot afford to take the e5-pawn!>>>>> Hence Radjabov is able to support his advanced White d6-passed pawn with his e-pawn based on these tactical factors.

A tremendous example on the interplay between <STRATEGY> and <TACTICS>: White wants to play 23 e4-e5! to create a protected passed d-pawn and finds a tactical way to justify this move which at first seems to simply drop a pawn to either of -two- Black pieces!

This is how you defeat a World Champion!

I cannot stress enough what a great game this is by Radjabov.

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: http://www.coruschess.com/report.ph...

<The last decisive game was Teimour Radjabovs win over Vishy Anand in a wild and crazy Semi Slav. The Azeri GM played very wisely, especially noteworthy was his plan starting with 14.Re1, later enabling the d5 central break. 18.b3 was another very good move, leading to a forced sequence, culminating with the very strong 21.d5! Possibly Vishy overlooked or underestimated 23.e5! (see diagram 4) The pawn was immune, as after 23Qxe5 24.Ba6 or 23Nxe5 24. axb4 axb4 25.Nc5 black is just dead. With 29.Ne4 white was increasing his advantage, shuffling his knight to the strong c4 square. Eventually the game was steered into a theoretical endgame where white had two rooks versus blacks rook and bishop (with pawns), which was always close to a draw, but not quite. First white tried to advance his position without playing f4, but after some dancing around played it anyways. It is unclear if it would have been enough for black to save the game, but the strongest defense could have been offered with 69...Kf6 instead of 69Kd6. Now the black king was cut off and his white counterpart progressed all the way to f6, at which point the world champion was forced to resign.>

So Anand's final mistake appears to be 69 ... ♔e7-d6?! instead of 69 ... ♔e7-f6!. Ironic how in the final position it is the -White- king which occupies the f6-square which should be occupied by the -Black- king.

Jan-13-08  TheBB: Mig points out that Anand could have claimed a three-time repetition if he had only played 63...Ra7 instead of Ra8. Oh well.
Jan-13-08  notyetagm: <TheBB: Mig points out that Anand could have claimed a three-time repetition if he had only played 63...Ra7 instead of Ra8. Oh well.>

Wow!!!

Totally outplayed by Radjabov yet Anand could -still- have forced a draw.

World Champion Anand is -really- tough to beat.

Jan-13-08  ahmadov: It is good that Radja avoided a draw by repeating moves against the World Champion on moves 15-16. The outcome proved that he was determined to win this game and hopefully the tournament as well...
Jan-13-08  notyetagm: From http://www.chessninja.com/dailydirt...:

<By the way, didn't Anand miss a repetition draw claim against Radjabov?! The position is identical after black moves 57..Kf6, 59..Kf6, and 63..Ra7 (instead of 63..Ra8). Holy heck.

Posted by: Mig at January 13, 2008 00:30 >

Jan-13-08  ahmadov: With an amateur eye, anyone could say that White was winning after move 43 but the game showed that it is not that easy against the Indian cobra...
Jan-13-08  percyblakeney: Marin's notes on the game show that it's not easy to find everything even when analysing afterwards:

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail...

Radjabov almost won already in the opening (or at least after 23 moves if he had found 24. axb4), he won even more in the middlegame, and then almost won on time as well, to reach an endgame some said was a technical win, and still Anand was only one move away from the draw...

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: <percyblakeney: ... Radjabov almost won already in the opening (or at least after 23 moves if he had found 24. axb4), he won even more in the middlegame, and then almost won on time as well, to reach an endgame some said was a technical win, and still Anand was only one move away from the draw...>

I am simply amazed at this.

Anand was -utterly- outplayed yet if he had played 63 ... ♖a7!= instead of 63 ... ♖a8?! he draws the game by repetition!!!!!

Jan-13-08  notyetagm: Radjabov vs Anand, 2008

http://www.chessbase.com/newsdetail... GM Marin explaining 23 e4-e5! and why Black cannot capture it with 23 ... ♕f6xe5? or 23 ... ♘d7xe5? much more simply than I did above:

<23.e5. White has achieved huge advance of space with shocking ease. The e5-pawn is taboo, because the knight has to guard the c5-square while the queen cannot expose herself to discovered attacks such as Ba6.>

Jan-13-08  Ulhumbrus: According to Marin, 14 Re1 is an innovation. An alternative to exchanging the black squared bishops by 14...Bf8 is 14...Qb6 using the tempo to attack the d4 pawn a second time eg 14...Qb6 15 d5 0-0-0
Jan-13-08  percyblakeney: TWIC's very sparse comments on the game (Mark Crowther): http://www.chesscenter.com/twic/eve...
Jan-13-08  Ulhumbrus: <percyblakeney: TWIC's very sparse comments on the game (Mark Crowther): http://www.chesscenter.com/twic/eve...;

The TWIC link gives the following comment:

<14.Re1 Bf8N [14...c5 15.dxc5 Rc8 16.a4 b4 17.c6 Bxc6 18.Nd5 Ne5 19.Be7 Qd7 20.Nf6+ Kxe7 21.Nxd7 Bxd7 22.Qd2 a5 23.Rad1 Rhd8 24.Qd6+ Ke8 25.Qb6 Ra8 26.Rd6 Rdb8 27.Qc5 Rc8 28.Qb6 Rcb8 29.Qe3 Rc8 30.h4 Ke7 31.Rb6 g4 32.f4 gxf3 33.gxf3 Bxa4 34.f4 Nd7 35.e5 Nxb6 36.Qxb6 Kf8 37.Bh5 c3 38.f5 cxb2 39.Qd6+ Kg8 40.Bxf7+ Kh8 41.f6 Rc1 42.fxg7+ Kxg7 43.Qe7 Rxe1+ 44.Kh2 Rh1+ 45.Kg3 Rg1+ 46.Kh2 b1Q 47.Be8+ Kh8 48.Qf6+ Rg7 0-1 Inarkiev,E (2674)-Aronian,L (2741)/Khanty-Mansiysk RUS 2007/The Week in Chess 682] >

Jan-13-08  acirce: <Hesam7> Just wanted to say that <Eyal> was the first to point it out, or maybe rather his computer. If not 24..axb4 then Black is just positionally lost and won't even be a pawn up any more.
Jan-13-08  Ulhumbrus: <Hesam7: During the game <acirce> pointed out that Radjabov had an immidiate win after: 24 axb4 axb4 25 Nc5! [1] 25...Nxc5 26 Rxa8 Bxa8 27 Qa1 Bb7 (27...Kd7 28 Qa5 Rc8 29 Qxc5 ) 28 Qa7 > After 28 Qa7 f6 29 Qxc5 fxe5 30 Bh5+ Kd7 31 Rxe5 c2! 32 Re1 Rf5! 33 Qe3 Qxe3 34 fxe3 Rc5 turns the tables
Jan-13-08  Bob726: Well, pratically if it wasn't for 3 times reptition ra7 is no better than ra8
Jan-13-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: <24 axb4 axb4 25 Nc5! [1] 25...Nxc5 26 Rxa8 Bxa8 27 Qa1 Bb7 (27...Kd7 28 Qa5 Rc8 29 Qxc5 ) 28 Qa7> After 28 Qa7 f6 29 Qxc5 fxe5 30 Bh5+ Kd7 31 Rxe5 c2! 32 Re1 Rf5! 33 Qe3 Qxe3 34 fxe3 Rc5 turns the tables>

31.Rxe5?? loses immediately to 31...Qc1+ with mate anyway - 31.Rd1 or Bf3 are better. But 29.Qxc5 is already an inaccuracy in this line. Strongest for White is 29.Bh5+ Kd7 30.Qb6! Rc8 (now the rook wouldn't be placed on the f file after fxe5) 31.Qxc5 fxe5 32.Rd1 and White's threat of Qb6 is decisive - 32...Rf8 33.Bf3, or 32...Qe4 33.Qb6 c5 34.Bf3.

Jan-13-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: <24 axb4 axb4 25 Nc5! [1] 25...Nxc5 26 Rxa8 Bxa8 27 Qa1 Bb7 (27...Kd7 28 Qa5 Rc8 29 Qxc5 ) 28 Qa7> After 28 Qa7 f6 29 Qxc5 fxe5 30 Bh5+ Kd7 31 Rxe5 c2! 32 Re1 Rf5! 33 Qe3 Qxe3 34 fxe3 Rc5 turns the tables> 31.Rxe5?? loses immediately to 31...Qc1+ with mate anyway - 31.Rd1 or Bf3 are better. But 29.Qxc5 is already an inaccuracy in this line. Strongest for White is 29.Bh5+ Kd7 30.Qb6! Rc8 (now the rook wouldn't be placed on the f file after fxe5) 31.Qxc5 fxe5 32.Rd1 and White's threat of Qb6 is decisive - 32...Rf8 33.Bf3, or 32...Qe4 33.Qb6 c5 34.Bf3.> It looks as if on 24 axb5 Black has to play 24...Qxb5
Jan-13-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: It looks as if on 24 axb5[4] Black has to play 24...Qxb5[4]> Well, in that case 25.Bc4, the pawn on c3 is doomed, and - to repeat what <acirce> said in a previous post - If not 24..axb4 then Black is just positionally lost and won't even be a pawn up any more.
Jan-13-08  Ulhumbrus: <Eyal: <Ulhumbrus: It looks as if on 24 axb5[4] Black has to play 24...Qxb5[4]> Well, in that case 25.Bc4, the pawn on c3 is doomed, and - to repeat what <acirce> said in a previous post - If not 24..axb4 then Black is just positionally lost and won't even be a pawn up any more.> After 25 Bc4 supppose White goes after the c3 pawn without delay.On 23 axb4 Qxb4 25 Bc4 0-0-0 26 Re3 f6 27 exf6 Nxf6 uncovers an attack upon White's d pawn. On 28 Bxe6+ Kb8 29 Nxc3 Rxd6 30 Qc2 Nd5 31 Nxd5 cxd5 and Black's d pawn may advance. In this variation on 29 d7 Nd5 30 Bxd5 cxd5 31 Nxc3 d4 32 Na2 Qb6 33 Rd3 Rxd7 Black seems to have the better of it.Of course that makes just two unproven variations.
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