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Peter Svidler vs Veselin Topalov
Pearl Spring Chess Tournament (2008), Nanjing CHN, rd 9, Dec-20
Caro-Kann Defense: Advance. Short Variation (B12)  ·  0-1

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Kibitzer's Corner
Dec-20-08  ILikeFruits: FIRST!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
mememememememememmee
vege power
:) :D :)
Dec-20-08  Ezzy: Svidler,P (2727) - Topalov,V (2791) [B12]
Pearl Spring Nanjing CHN (9), 20.12.2008

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.e5 Bf5 4.Nf3 e6 5.Be2 c5 6.Be3 Nd7 7.Nbd2 c4 8.a4< Novelty. 8 00 has been played before.> 8...h6 9.b3 cxb3 10.Nxb3< Now white has a backward c pawn on an open file as a target. You can't keep giving Topalov targets; he more often than not hits the bullseye >10...Rc8 <Threat 11...Bxc2> 11.Ra2 Qc7< After 11 moves white is already on the defence. Black has to do some developing though.> 12.Bd3 Bxd3 13.Qxd3 Ne7 14.00 Qc4 15.Rb1 b6 16.Qf1 Nc6 <You wouldn't think black is behind in development. His pieces are doing much more work than whites.> 17.c3 <Svidler resigns himself to the fact that defending this pawn is getting him nowhere.> 17...Qxc3 18.a5 Be7 19.axb6 axb6 20.Qd1 Qc4 21.Nc1 <Threatening to trap Topalov's queen with 22 Nd2 Qc3 23 Rb3> 21...Nb4 22.Ra7?! <A lone rook wandering away from the action. But I suppose Svidler has to try to create something. [22.Rab2 May be better.]> 22...Qc2 23.Qxc2 Nxc2< [23...Rxc2?? 24.Ra8+]> 24.Bd2 Na3 25.Ra1 Nc4 <Tremendous outpost for the knight.> 26.Rb7 Nb8 27.Ra8 00< After 27 moves of doing damage to Svidlers position, Topalov now decides to castle. A rarity for him these days :-) And even his castling creates a threat. 28...Nxd2 and whites knight on c1 is hanging.> 28.Raxb8 Nxd2 29.Rxc8 Nxf3+ 30.gxf3 Rxc8 31.Ne2 Bd8 32.f4< with the idea of 33 f5 exf5 34 Nf4 giving whit some counterplay.> 32...g6 33.Kg2 Kf8 34.Kf3 Ra8 <Topalov can freely aim at targets with his rook and bishop, whereas Svidler has nothing to aim for.> 35.Ke3< The worst place he could of put his king, but his position was dodgy anyway.> 35...Ra3+ 36.Kd2 Bh4< and whites pawns are a tumbling down.> 0-1

Another masterclass performance from Topalov. So he wins the tournament with a round to spare. Fantastic achievement. Topalov's playing awesome chess at the moment which is a joy to watch. Kamsky beware!

Dec-20-08  notyetagm: FINAL POSITION

36 ... ♗d8-h4 0-1


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<<<Topalov can freely aim at targets with his rook and bishop, whereas Svidler has nothing to aim for.>> 35.Ke3 The worst place he could of put his king, but his position was dodgy anyway. 35...Ra3+ 36.Kd2 Bh4<< and whites pawns are a tumbling down.>> 0-1>

Exactly. White simply has too many <WEAK PAWNS>, or as Capablanca would say, too many <PAWN ISLANDS>.

White has only one pawn that can be defended by other pawns, the White e5-pawn. That means that he has four, count'em four(!) pawn chain bases that must be defended by the White pieces: the d4-pawn, double+isolated f-pawns, and the isolated h-pawn.

Black on the other hand (after sac'ing the b-pawn), can play ... h6-h5 and have only one(!) <PAWN ISLAND>, with only one weakness, the <PAWN CHAIN BASE> the Black f7-pawn.

So the target/weakness count would be:

White 4
Black 1

It's no wonder Svidler resigned early here. This endgame would be pure torture.

In short, Svidler resigned because of his multiple <PAWN WEAKNESSES>. A textbook example of this type of weakness and how simply having <WEAK PAWNS> can lead even 2700-level players to defeat.

Dec-20-08  refutor: Svidler's novelty wasn't terrible, the idea is to "punish" Black for playing ...c4 prematurely. he was playing for imbalances, but the backwards c-pawn was terribly weak. would 10.cxb3 work better? i guess the problem with that is that the Bf5 controls all the squares. maybe the same idea for White could work but with the Bf5 exchanged off?
Dec-21-08  notyetagm: <refutor: Svidler's novelty wasn't terrible, the idea is to "punish" Black for playing ...c4 prematurely. he was playing for imbalances, but the backwards c-pawn was terribly weak.>

Yes, at this level a mistaken strategy can easily cost you the game.

Dec-21-08  notyetagm: <Ezzy: Svidler,P (2727) - Topalov,V (2791) [B12] Pearl Spring Nanjing CHN (9), 20.12.2008

...

<<<Another masterclass performance from Topalov.>>> So he wins the tournament with a round to spare. Fantastic achievement. Topalov's playing awesome chess at the moment which is a joy to watch. Kamsky beware!>

Masterclass performance, indeed.

Dec-21-08  arnaud1959: 2.5/3 for Caro-Kann in this tournament. It may be a drawish opening but if white chooses a sharp line black has good winning chances
Jan-14-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <notyetagm>

White simply has too many <WEAK PAWNS>, or as Capablanca would say, too many <PAWN ISLANDS>.

Capablanca never said anything about pawn islands AFAIK. In fact he won with them.

H E Atkins vs Capablanca, 1922

<Yes, at this level a mistaken strategy can easily cost you the game.>

At any level a mistaken strategy can cost you the game.

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