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Gyula Kluger vs Henri Grob
Budapest (1955)
Neo-Grünfeld Defense: Delayed Exchange Variation (D74)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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Jun-29-10  I Like Fish: hello...

fruits...
relaunched...
good fun...

Jun-29-10  ILoveFruits: hello fish...
it's been...
a while...
Jun-29-10  gofer: White is at a huge advantage, better developed and with a passed pawn on d6, so really its all over at this stage. The only question is how to translate this position into a position where black resigns. Well I think our aim is to play Bd5 skewering the queen. But Nf3 is in the way, so lets move it! Not 19 Nd4 Nxd4 or 19 Ne5 Nxe5, but ...

19 Nxg5 fxg5
20 Bd5 gxf5
21 Bxf7+ Rxf7 (Kxf7 22 Qd5+ Kg6 23 d7 and black is in trouble!)

Now white has lost 3 minor pieces for the white queen, which isn't that good, but white has a huge positional advantage, so all is not lost!

22 Re8+ ...

22 ... Bf8 23 d7 Bxd7 24 Rxa8 winning
22 ... Rf8 23 Qd5+ Kh8 24 Rxf8 Bxf8 25 d7 Bxd7 26 Qxd7 winning

I also looked at 19 Re7 which seems okay. In general I think white is so dominant that almost any move will win...

Time to check...

Jun-29-10  SloVice: <cromat: How about 19...Qd7 ? - that i saw first and said i cant solve this tuesday puzzle. of course with white in adv but not 3 pawns.>

I think if 19...Qd7, then 20.Bh3 Qd8 21.Qd5+ Kh8 22.Nf7+ Rxf7 23.Qxf7

Jun-29-10  Patriot: This seems a little complicated for a Tuesday.

To play 19.Nxg5 OTB with confidence, doing a material inventory helps. Usually exchanging 3 pieces for a queen is considered equal but seems risky, in my opinion. But seeing that black is already down a pawn, white may be losing three pieces for the queen but grabs another pawn in the process. I also saw the possibility of Qd6 in some lines, and pushing d7.

It's kind of silly to calculate everything that can happen if black declines the knight. Since black has no counterplay then he is only at a loss. If he had serious counterplay then it must be analyzed further.

I didn't calculate up to 22.Re8+ but felt already that I found the best sequence.

Jun-29-10  Patriot: <JG27Pyth> <Yes Nxg5 is quickly findable as a candidate -- but you have to calculate the refusals and did anyone see all the way to the 23.d7!! beauty?>

23.d7 is definitely icing on the cake, but I don't think it's necessary to foresee it since white is already better and there's no counterplay for black to speak of.

Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  benveniste: This is one of those puzzles I found easy to play and very difficult to "solve."

Finding 19. ♘xg5 was easy. But it's a long way from a forced win, after, say:

19. ♘xg5 ♕g6
20. ♗e4 ♕h5
21. ♗f3 ♕g6
22. ♘e6 ...

Jun-29-10  Patriot: <benveniste> <Finding 19.Nxg5 was easy. But it's a long way from a forced win...>

Declining is simply lost. White doesn't need to do anything complicated. For example, what does black have if white just plays 20.Nf3?

Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: 19.Nxg5 duffs him up great tactic. Clreic comes in and crystal clear is kings tragedy. Isnt it genteelly short. Henris got plenty of holes in his defence d7 is the final turn of the screw. Hes relaxing next port of call rook channels over Rxc8. I dig the hatchet d5 d6 gift for a Grunfeld classic Smyslov would have approved.
Jun-29-10  Marmot PFL: It was a bad day for Grob. He played that like a 1800 player.
Jun-29-10  YetAnotherAmateur: This was definitely more complex than your standard Tuesday.

I saw Nxg5 as being a valuable move - activating the g2 bishop was badly needed, and if black takes the bait then Bd5 recovers nicely. It's also definitely not a losing move for white, but it's hard to say that it's really a key winning move either.

Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: White gains a tempo so that the queen can be pinned.
Jun-29-10  LIFE Master AJ: <<dzechiel> <White is winning here, but this seems much more complicated than your typical Tuesday position.>>

My thoughts exactly. The "line-opening" sack of Nxg5, followed by Bd5 is pretty simple to find. However, Black gets 2 minor pieces for the Queen, and it seems more complicated than the average Tuesday puzzle.

<dzechiel> Excellent post. (As usual.) Yours is often the first post that I read! :)

Jun-29-10  YouRang: Spotted it pretty quickly when I noticed that black queen and king were exposed on the same diagonal.

With instincts like a tiger, I looked around the board for my light-squares bishop, and found it on g2 hiding behind a knight.

My LSB was all poised to go on the critical Q+K pinning diagonal, even with protection from my queen. All I had to do was get the knight out of the way, preferably with a forcing move.

And sitting there before me by sheer luck (the sort of sheer luck that happens a lot in these puzzles) was a forcing move for my knight: 19.Nxg5 winning a pawn with attack on black's queen.

The knight is safe since 19...fxg5 loses the Q to the 20.Bd5 pin, and black doesn't appear to have any counter-attack.

This alone would compel me to play <19.Nxg5>. I suppose it's good form to consider what black would do besides ...fxg5 (clearly he must unpin right away). But in any case I'm up a pawn and I appear to have a killer attack underway. I didn't consider all black replies, but one pretty one goes like this:

19...Qe7 20.Re7 Nxe7 21.dxe7 Re8 22.Qc4+ Kh8 23.Nf7+, and I think many of us by now will smell the coming smothered -mate queen sac. :-)

Jun-29-10  ILoveFruits: oh dears...
Jun-29-10  cjgone: Took me way to long to solve this one. I kept trying to push the rook up to my pawn and/or the pawn. Then I noticed the bishop and that the queen was infact pinned to the king. Pwned. :D
Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  doubledrooks: I went for 19. Nxg5, anticipating 19...fxg5 20. Bd5 gxf4 21. Bxf7+ and now:

a. 21...Kxf7 22. Qd5+ Kg6 23. d7

b. 21...Rxf7 22.Re8+

b.1 22...Rf8 23. Qd5+ Kh8 24. Rxf8+ Bxf8 25. d7

b.2 22...Bf8 23. d7

b.2.1 23...Bxd7 24. Rxa8

b.2.2 23...Rxd7 24. Qxf8#

Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White is a pawn ahead.

Black threatens 19... gxf4.

The alignment of Black's royal family on the a2-g8 diagonal suggests 19.Nxg5:

A) 19... fxg5 20.Bd5 gxf4 21.Bxf7+

A.1) 21... Rxf7 22.Re8+

A.1.a) 22... Rf8 23.Qd5+ Kh8 24.Rxf8+ Bxf8 25.d7 + - [Q+P vs B+N].

A.1.b) 22... Bf8 23.d7 + - [Q+P vs B+N] (23... Rxd7 24.Qxf8#; 23... Bxd7 24.Rxa8).

A.2) 21... Kxf7 22.Qd5+ Kf(g)6 23.d7 Rd8 24.dxc8=Q Raxc8 25.Qe6+ + - [Q+P vs B+N].

B) 19... Qd7 20.Bd5+ Kh8 21.Be6

B.1) 21... Qd8 22.Nf7+ Rxf7 23.Bxf7 + - [R+2P vs N].

B.2) 21... b6 22.Qc2 fxg5 23.Bxd7 Bxd7 24.Bxg5 + - [Q+3P vs B+N].

C) 19... Qh5 20.Bd5+ Kh8 21.Nf7+ Qxf7 (otherwise 22.Qxh5) 22.Bxd5 Rxd5 23.Qd5 Rf8 (23... Rd7 24.Re8+ Bf8 25.Rxf8+ Kg7 26.Qg8#) 22.d7, etc.

D) 19... Qg6 20.Bd5+ Kh8 21.Ne6 + - [2P].

Jun-29-10  vsadek: <Once> I am missing your post today.
Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <cromat: How about 19...Qd7?> Well with two pawns down and a worse position, Black is technically lost.

However, after 19...Qd7, White can initiate a quick and decisive attack with 20. Nxh7! when play might continue 20...Kxh7 21. Qh5+ Kg8 22. Bd5+ Rf7 23. Re7 Nxe7 24. Qxf7+ Kh8 25. Qh5+ Bh6 26. Qxh6#.

Jun-29-10  beenthere240: <Patzer2>
Of course, black can continue to decline the sac offers: 20. Nxh7 Rd8! -- taking a sort of Bartleby approach in which he simply refuses to capture. Then he's only 3 pawns down and in an unspeakable position.
Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: I got the general idea
Jun-29-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <beenthere240> After 19...Qd7 20. Nxh7 Rd8, White has 21. Qh5! with an easy win (e.g. 21...Qg4 22. Nxf6+! Bxf6 23. Bd5+ Kg7 24. Qh6#).
Jun-29-10  I Like Fish: it is ...
within walking distance ...
good riddance ...
Jun-30-10  turbo231: missed it didn't notice I could pin the queen with the bishop I can't seem to dig that deep
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