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Hikaru Nakamura vs Anatoly Karpov
Donostia Chess Festival (2009), Donostia ESP, rd 1, Jul-07
Queen's Gambit Declined: Harrwitz Attack (D37)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-07-09  timhortons: 46. Qc8+ Kh7 47. Nf8+ Kg8 48. Ng6+ Kh7 49. Ne7 Qf2+ 50. Kxf2 Ra2+ 51. Be2 Ra8 52. Qxa8 h5 53. Qe8 g5 54. Qg6+ Kh8 55. Qh6#)

naka missed this winning line.

Jul-07-09  ILikeFruits: oh noes...
the great karpov...
must win...
Jul-07-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: In the final position is there a sudden win I miss?
Jul-07-09  Marmot PFL: <whiteshark> Black can drag it out for many moves with 65...Rxe5 66 Nxf5 Kd5 67 Kg4 and so on but it is hopeless.
Jul-07-09  timhortons: i read the kibitz of the GM's at icc that after Naka pick up two of karpov knights karpov cant do thing when naka would escort his pawn to a quening square.

lets say all the pawn is gone and the only pieces left on board is naka knight and bishop and king then karpovs king. I would love to see naka creating the mating net.

id seen at icc that naka at times is practicing at the training bot these mate.

Jul-08-09  notyetagm: Nakamura vs Karpov, 2009

Naka! Naka! Naka!

Jul-08-09  kurtrichards: How did Karpov lose the game? I was not able to follow the game live (am not a premium member) that's why am wondering how did Karpov lose his 1st game against Nakamura. Was it by time forfeit?
Jul-08-09  esticles: <kurtrichards> You don't have to be a premium member! Major tournaments are usually broadcast live for free on monroi.com, chessdom.com, chessok.com, and the tournament website (which in this case is www.donostiachess.com/en/live-games/ )

Karpov lost on time (although the position was lost anyway: After the e and f pawns are off, white gangs up on black's g-pawn to win it and then pushes his own g-pawn. Black cannot stop the pawn so must eventually give up his rook for it, giving white a winning B+N ending.)

Jul-08-09  kurtrichards: Thanks <esticles>. Reading from the above kibitzes I've known that Karpov spent so much time in the opening. As black, Karpov doesn't use the Queen's Gambit Declined as a defense to 1.d4. Nimzo-Indian and Queen's Indian Defenses are his reply to 1.d4.
Jul-08-09  Riverbeast: <that's why am wondering how did Karpov lose his 1st game against Nakamura>

This is not Karpov's first loss to Nakamura, he also lost to him at Cap D'Agde in rapid and blitz games.

Nakamura seems to own Karpov!

Jul-08-09  Knight13: <ILikeFruits: oh noes...
the great karpov...
must win...>

Look, at least Karpov is not sitting on his laurels like Kasparov or Fischer.

Jul-08-09  WhiteRook48: or being a bad sportsman like Fischer
Jul-08-09  timhortons: <least Karpov is not sitting on his laurels like Kasparov or Fischer.>

oh yah, his pride is hard hit by these losses.

Jul-08-09  goldenbear: I have no idea where Karpov went wrong in the opening. It's not possible that the ridiculous 27.g5 holds, is it?
Jul-08-09  totololo: Another nice mate:
46. Qc8+ Kh7 47. Nf8+ Kg8 48. Ng6+ Kh7 49. Ne7 h5 50. Qg8+ Kh6 51. Qh8+ Kg5 52. Qxg7+ Kh4 53. Ng6+ (Qxg6 is a clear loss)Kg5 54.Qf6+ Kh6 55. Nf8+ Qg6 56. Qxg6#

I think that this variation has the best esthetic content.... as a black King long walk forth and back to be mated. The black queen is a blocker for the black king so helps the theme... long walk.

Jul-08-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: <totololo> I'm pretty sure in that your line, 53... Nxf5# would be faster
Jul-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <After the e and f pawns are off, white gangs up on black's g-pawn to win it and then pushes his own g-pawn. Black cannot stop the pawn so must eventually give up his rook for it, giving white a winning B+N ending.)>

This is actually extraordinarily difficult to accomplish against stubborn defence.

Try it out against your chess engine set on full power, from the resigned position.

Jul-11-09  Astardis: <kurtrichards: As black, Karpov doesn't use the Queen's Gambit Declined as a defense to 1.d4. >

Then I wonder who played the 151 games available in this database showing some Karpov dude playing the QGD with the black pieces :)

Jul-11-09  Shams: <This is actually extraordinarily difficult to accomplish against stubborn defence.>

It can be quite tricky, Jessica! Not in the same league as winning ♔♕ vs. ♔♖ against stubborn defense. Walter Browne had to train hard for months to win that against a computer! With a couple hours' work you can now own this endgame such that you could win it in a minute from any starting position. If that sounds like my Anthony Robbins pitch, it is. :)

A couple years ago I was seized with the fear that I would get this endgame in a tourney and drop a crucial half-point. I went the long route in learning this endgame...I speak of ye olde Philidor method, that being massage the king towards the mating corner but then (inexplicably!) let him go at *just* the right time-- let him off the edge of the board, seemingly running for the plains like an antelope-- while you refashion your lariat into a noose and catch him at the end. Lots of drama and frustration.

If you want the short route, and I recommend the exercise, watch this video twice-- it's the much simpler "Deletang method", also called "three triangles":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWZ7...

...then practice for two hours here-- you can set it up for random positions I think:

http://www.chessvideos.tv/endgame-t...

It's fun, and it'll make you feel like a stronger chessplayer. It really is remarkable how many squares a bishop and a knight can take away if they're well coordinated.

Jul-11-09  Shams: Another tricky one that shows the defensive, not offensive, powers of the combined ♘ and ♗ is ♔♘♗ vs. ♔♕. I practice against the computer and I still can't really mate with the queen.
Jul-11-09  timhortons: Onto the round itself, I got White against the 12th World Champion, Anatoly Karpov who is, in my opinion, the second best player to have ever lived (Kasparov is first). The game turned into a Queens Gambit Declined and I chose the 5.Bf4 variation. I am not quite sure whether Karpov was expecting this or simply unsure which line to choose as he has played this with both colors more times than I ever will. Nevertheless, he went for the 7...Na6 variation and obtained a slightly worse position out of the opening phase. Due to the time control, I was able to get a big advantage as he neared time pressure. From here, I proceeded to completely blow it as I missed about 3-4 easy wins. However, I was still winning at the end when Karpov flagged on the 61st move. In all likelihood, I would have been forced to mate him with bishop and knight

<from h.nakamura chess blog>

Jul-11-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  jessicafischerqueen: <Shams>

Thanks for those wonderful links!

Jul-14-09  aragorn69: Nakamura's comments:

<Round 1: The Living Legend Named Karpov

At the opening ceremony, I drew the number 1 which I seem to pick fairly often. Despite the fact that it is supposed to be a huge advantage due to starting off a tournament with double whites, I have found that it is very much a double edged sword. For instance, if you fail to convert in the first two games, there will be huge pressure to win with Black. Also, I was not overly thrilled about this drawing due to a certain uncertainty involving my performance as I was coming straight from the World Open in Philadelphia. Nevertheless, it is supposed to be an advantage and you just have to deal with it.

Onto the round itself, I got White against the 12th World Champion, Anatoly Karpov who is, in my opinion, the second best player to have ever lived (Kasparov is first). The game turned into a Queens Gambit Declined and I chose the 5.Bf4 variation. I am not quite sure whether Karpov was expecting this or simply unsure which line to choose as he has played this with both colors more times than I ever will. Nevertheless, he went for the 7...Na6 variation and obtained a slightly worse position out of the opening phase. Due to the time control, I was able to get a big advantage as he neared time pressure. From here, I proceeded to completely blow it as I missed about 3-4 easy wins. However, I was still winning at the end when Karpov flagged on the 61st move. In all likelihood, I would have been forced to mate him with bishop and knight. I have been paying a bit of attention to Mig's blog on ChessNinja, and I completely disagree with his assessment that none of the younger generation are aware or scared of Karpov. I am pretty sure that the reason I nearly blew the win is because the thought of beating such a legend made me nervous. >

Source: http://www.hikarunakamura.com/main/...

Jul-14-09  aragorn69: As to the Karpov fear factor, that was in round one. With each later round in San Sebastian you get the feeling that Mig's assessment wasn't as far off the mark as Naka says...
Oct-10-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Astardis: <kurtrichards: As black, Karpov doesn't use the Queen's Gambit Declined as a defense to 1.d4. >

Then I wonder who played the 151 games available in this database showing some Karpov dude playing the QGD with the black pieces :)>

<That> Karpov was some tourist.

If you can look up Kasparov amidst his political labours, maybe he would tell you who the other Karpov was.

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