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Etienne Bacrot vs Magnus Carlsen
Nanjing Pearl Spring Tournament (2010), Nanjing CHN, rd 6, Oct-26
Queen's Indian Defense: Fianchetto. Nimzowitsch Variation (E15)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-26-10  Eyal: <b3wins: OK: 55...Kc8 56.b6 axb6 57.a6 Kb8 58.Bc6 Nf8 59.Be5 seems to win>

It's not so simple: instead of 57...Kb8?? Black has 57...Ne4! But anyway, intuitively I would also recommend an active defense with ...e5 as soon as possible, otherwise it's going into positions where Black seems to be walking a zugzwang precipice (just to illustrate: after 55...Nc8 56.Bc6 in the Rybka line, 56...Nb8 would lose to 57.Be5+ Nd6 58.Be8!).

Oct-26-10  virginmind: <b3wins> i took a nap and only then read your reply here. here's what fritz 11 at 26 ply answers to 48.b5 Nf7 49.a4(as there's no 49...Kc7 from fritz, up to 26 ply):

Bacrot,E - Carlsen,M, Pearl Spring Chess Tournament 2010


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Analysis by Fritz 11:

1. (0.91): 49...e5 50.Bh5 Nd8 51.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 52.Bxe5+ Kxe5 53.a5 Ne6 54.Bf3 Kd6 55.b6 axb6 56.a6 Ke5 57.a7 Nc7 58.Ke3 f4+ 59.Kd3 Kf5 60.a8Q Nxa8 61.Bxa8 Ke5 2. (1.17): 49...Nh6 50.Ke3 Ng8 51.a5 Ne7 52.Bg7 Kc7 53.Bf3 Kd6 54.Bh5 Kc7 55.Kd2 Kd6 56.Be8 Nc8 57.Ke3 Kc7 58.Kd3 Kd6 59.Bg6 Ne7 60.Be8 Nc8

(me, 26.10.2010)

Oct-26-10  virginmind: <b3wins> while at 27 ply it gives this:

Bacrot,E - Carlsen,M, Pearl Spring Chess Tournament 2010


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Analysis by Fritz 11:

1. (0.83): 49...e5 50.Bh5 e4+ 51.Ke3 Ke6 52.Bxf7+ Kxf7 53.a5 Ke7 54.b6 Nxb6 55.axb6 axb6 56.Be5 Kd7 57.Kd2 Kc6 58.Bf6 2. (1.36): 49...Nh6 50.Bh5 Ng8 51.a5 Ngf6 52.Bf7 Ke7 53.b6 a6 54.Bxf6+ Nxf6 55.Bh5 Kd6 56.Bf3 Ng8 57.Ke3 Ne7 58.Bb7 Nc6 59.Bxc6

(me, 26.10.2010)

Oct-26-10  b3wins: <Eyal> and <virginmind>, thank you for your contributions. I agree that allowing white a4-a5 without counterplay is likely to lead to zugzwang. <virginmind>, in your first line, after 48.b5 Nf7 49.a4 e5 50.Bh5 Nd8 51.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 52.Bxe5+ Kxe5 53.a5 Ne6 54.Bf3 Kd6 55.b6 axb6 56.a6 Ke5 57.a7 Nc7 58.Ke3 f4+ 59.Kd3 Kf5 60.a8Q Nxa8 61.Bxa8 Ke5 - the evaluation is insufficient. Can you continue this further to a win or draw? Personally, I think white wins: 62.Kc3 Kf5 63.Kb3 Kg4 64.Ka4 f3 65.Bxf3 Kxf3 66.Kb5 Ke4 67.Kxb6 Kd4 68.Kb5 wins for white.

Now seeing that in your second post black avoids this line by playing ...e4, perhaps a better move order for white is 48.b5 Nf7 49.Bh5, and only then a4.

Oct-26-10  b3wins: I must add that all the lines posted by <virginmind> after 48.b5 look dangerous for black. White is free to move around with the bishops and find the best moment to create a passed pawn in the queenside, exchange one bishop, and in some lines win a knight for the passed pawn which seems to win the game as well.
Oct-26-10  virginmind: <b3wins> finally(he he) at 29 ply it gives this(notice at second choice it does appear a 50.a5, but as following 49...Ke7, not Kc7)

Bacrot,E - Carlsen,M, Pearl Spring Chess Tournament 2010


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Analysis by Fritz 11:

1. (0.83): 49...e5 50.Bh5 e4+ 51.Ke3 Ke6 52.Bxf7+ Kxf7 53.a5 Ke7 54.b6 Nxb6 55.axb6 axb6 56.Be5 Kd7 57.Kd2 Kc6 58.Bf6 2. (1.17): 49...Ke7 50.a5 Nd6 51.Ke3 Nf6 52.Be5 Nd7 53.Bg7 Kf7 54.Bc3 Ke7 55.Bb2 Nc8 56.Kf3 Kd6 57.Bg7 Ne7 58.Ke3 Kc7 59.Bf3 Kd6 60.Bh5 Kc7 61.Kd2 Kd6 62.Be8 Nc8 63.Ke3 Ke7 64.Bh5

(me, 26.10.2010)

Oct-26-10  b3wins: What about an immedite 48...e5 after 48.b5?
I'm currently looking at 49.fxe5+ Nxe5 50.Bxe5+ Kxe5 51.Bf3 Ne6 52.a4 Nd4 53.a5 Nxf3 54.b6, or 51...Kf4 52.Bd5, both of which are very sharp. Is white winning?
Oct-26-10  Eyal: <b3wins> That Fritz line seems to be riddled with mistakes anyway, but it's worth noting that after 48.b5 Nf7 49.a4 e5 50.Bh5 Nd8 51.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 52.Bxe5+ Kxe5 53.a5 Ne6 (...Kd6! should be better) 54.Bf3 (a6! should be better) Kd6 55.b6, 55...axb6?? indeed loses but 55...a6! seems to draw, with the black knight coming to d4 (e.g., 56.Bb7 Nd4 57.Bxa6 Nc6/b3 followed by Nxa5.)
Oct-26-10  virginmind: <b3wins> thats fritz' second choice, as shown in the reply given to <kellmano> earlier - but only at 25 ply. if you wish, i can leave it run for that option till, say, 29 ply?
Oct-26-10  drnooo: some more recently discovered games by
both Napoleon and and finally some by Shakespeare. Nothing, absolutely nothing earthshaking in the Napoleons but the few eyewitnesses to Shakespeare's apparently he always opened his games with white by 2b or not 2b and then didnt, stopped fingering that pawn and pushed e4
Oct-26-10  SetNoEscapeOn: <Domdaniel: < shakespeare: Wang is tortured to death by Anand> Such an exquisite Shakespearean turn of phrase. Is it from Titus Andronicus?>

He merely said tortured, not dismembered and eaten :)

<turbo231: No I looked it up Carlsen has white against Anand. But Anand can beat anyone with black.>

Yes, and against Carlsen he's 4-1 with black (decisive classical games) including the ending slip by Magnus in Bilbao.

Oct-26-10  b3wins: <Eyal> and <virginmind> - I have read all of your posts. Right now I consider 48...Nf7 a waste of tempo for black because of 49.Bh5, so I'm looking at: 48.b5 e5 49.fxe5+ Nxe5 50.Bxe5+ Kxe5 51.Bf3 Ne6 52.a4 Nd4 53.a5 Nxf3 54.b6, or 51...Kf4 52.Bd5

Can you please check those?

If both lose for black, then maybe 52...Kd6

Oct-26-10  b3wins: <Eyal>, 52...Kd6 in my recent post is one extra tempo for black compared to (53...Kd6!) in your last post which refutes the Fritz line.

After 52...Kd6 in my recent post, white can continue 53.a5 Nd4 54.Bd5. My plan is not to allow 54.b6 a6!, but to wait for a favorable moment to play either b6 or first a6.

Oct-26-10  b3wins: OK, ignore 54.Bd5 in my last post (...Nxb5 55.cxb5 Kxd5 56.a6 c4+! with Kc5).
Oct-26-10  Eyal: <b3wins> Yes, in case of <48.b5 e5 49.fxe5+ Nxe5 50.Bxe5+ Kxe5 51.Bf3 Ne6 52.a4 Nd4 53.a5 Nxf3 54.b6> or <51...Kf4 52.Bd5> the moves ...Nxf3 and ...Kf4 are suicidal; Black should play 52...Kd6 in the first line and can apparently hold this B vs. N endgame (53.a5 Kc7).
Oct-26-10  Marmot PFL: If Carlsen had white they would probably still be playing.
Oct-26-10  b3wins: <Eyal> it's too early for me to conclude that black can hold this, let's keep analyzing! 48.b5 e5 49.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 50.Bxe5+ (we haven't yet checked the other winning attempt, 50.Ke3, which will wait for later analysis) 50...Kxe5 51.Bf3 Ne6 52.a4 Kd6 53.a5 Nd4 54.Ke3 It seems that black may lose f5, while Nb3 is met by a6. Black's pieces are limited because of a possible breakthrough.
Oct-26-10  Eyal: <b3wins> I think that once White pushes the pawn to a6 Black doesn't even have to defend the f-pawn, because he can successfully blockade on the dark squares of the Q-side.
Oct-26-10  virginmind: <b3wins> ok, here's fritz11 finding at 29 ply after 48...e5:

Bacrot,E - Carlsen,M, Pearl Spring Chess Tournament 2010


click for larger view

Analysis by Fritz 11:

1. (1.26): 49.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 50.Ke3 Ndf7 51.Kf4 Ke6 52.Bxe5 Nxe5 53.a4 Ng6+ 54.Kg5 Ne5 55.a5 Nf7+ 56.Kf4 Ne5 57.a6 Nd7 58.Bd3 Nb6 59.Bxf5+ Kd6 60.Bd3 Ke6 61.Ke4 Kd6 2. (0.71): 49.Ke3 e4 50.a4 Ke6 51.a5 Nb7 52.Bd1 Nd6 53.Bb3 Nf6 54.Ke2 Nc8 55.Be5 Ng4 56.Bb2 Nh2 57.Kd2 Ng4 58.Ba1 Nd6 59.Ke2 Nf6

(me, 26.10.2010)

Oct-26-10  Bobwhoosta: <virginmind>

That position looks drawn to my eye, but seeing as I only have a 28 ply brain (and 4-ply toilet paper!!) I can't really say for sure.

Oct-26-10  Bobwhoosta: <virginmind>

Wait a minute, match my brain to my toilet paper, and that's 32-ply!!!

Oct-26-10  Eyal: From chessvibes:

<"I think this whole plan with …c5 and …Nc6 was wrong," Carlsen said about his dubious opening phase.

11.dxc5! [that's the point when Carlsen paused for a long think, probably realizing he got into trouble]

11...Bxc5 At first Carlsen was intending to play 11... Be5 12. Rb1 bxc5 13. Ndxe4 Qb6 but then he saw that 14. Qc2 is quite unpleasant. Black has to play 14... g6 and after 15. Nf3 he has to give up his bishop on e5.

12. Ndxe4 Qxd1

12... Bd4?! 13. Rb1 e5?! (Savon vs S Kalugin, 2000) 14.Qf3!

13. Rxd1 Rad8 14. Rxd8 Rxd8 15. Nxc5 Rd1+ 16. Bf1 bxc5 17. Bb2 Rxa1 18. Bxa1

White has clearly won the opening battle - he has the bishop pair and a better pawn structure. "If you have to play such an ending something has gone horribly wrong" (Carlsen).

[...]

35...Nc8 Both players agreed that White has serious winning chances here, but none of them saw a clear winning plan> (http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/a...)

Oct-26-10  b3wins: <Eyal> and <virginmind> Just to summarize, since I don't have time to continue analyzing this: It seems that the last Fritz line posted
<(1.26): 48.b5 e5 49.fxe5+ Nxe5+ 50.Ke3 Ndf7 51.Kf4 Ke6 52.Bxe5 Nxe5 53.a4 Ng6+ 54.Kg5 Ne5 55.a5 Nf7+ 56.Kf4 Ne5 57.a6 Nd7 58.Bd3 Nb6 59.Bxf5+ Kd6 60.Bd3 Ke6 61.Ke4 Kd6> confirms this B vs. N ending to be drawn, as Eyal pointed above, even after black loses f5.

The comments at chessvibes are also logical, implying that white shouldn't have traded two pairs of pawns (starting from the committal move 35.h4) without creating new weaknesses for black.

Speaking of superior bishops versus knights and creating weaknesses in the endgame, two games from Cap d'Agde caught my eye: Ivanchuk - Pelletier (round 1)
Hammer - Zhu Chen (round 5)
The losing side didn't play very well due to time trouble, but both games show some possibilities. Ivanchuk consistently plays for the h7 weakness (even against computer recommendations - see chessbomb), and it pays off at the end. Hammer capitalized on a mistake by his opponent (45...h6) to win by pressing on both sides of the board.

Oct-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Black (carslen) was never in trouble. 1) Whites king can't penetrate the position. 2) The Bishops can't get behind either pawn chain.
Oct-27-10  Hesam7: Now looking back at this game I am wondering whether allowing Black to exchange his bishop for the White knight (26. Ke3 Bxf3 27. Bxf3) was such a good idea. I am sure the BB vs NN looks very appealing over the board but in terms of concrete play the Black bishop could not defend the c5 weakness while the White knight could attack it. So in a way that exchange made Carlsen's job in defending the position easier not harder.
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