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Magnus Carlsen vs Viswanathan Anand
Nanjing Pearl Spring Tournament (2010), Nanjing CHN, rd 7, Oct-27
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. Rio Gambit Accepted (C67)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 18 OF 18 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: It told you so! How childish! Nonsense. No one could predict it really. It seemed likely near end of course. C'est la vie.
Oct-27-10  MTuraga: A fair result. I would say both played erroneously.
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  vonKrolock: after 66...♔h6


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If 67.e6?? then ♖xa3! etc winning (pointed out by the chesspro.ru commentator)

Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: A great game with typically changing fortunes.
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: An epic struggle. Could have been one of the finest games in Carlsen's career so far if not for the tactical slip at the end, but of course kudos to Anand for a great save.
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: Error is the soul of all great chess games.
Oct-27-10  lost in space: aaaoooohhh, I am too late
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: <Richard> I believe you're channeling Chuck Berry ... "c'est la vie, say the old folks, it goes to show you never can tell..."
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <61.Kg1!> with the idea of 62.Bxg6 Qxg6 63.Rg3 would have been winning.


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Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  lostemperor: Probably Anand want to say to Carlsen a memorable quote from The Cincinnati Kid (1965):

"You're good, kid, but as long as I'm around, ... well you're still good (but only second best for now)" :)

Oct-27-10  turbo231: They still have 3 more games to play. I didn't know that. I've been concentrating on Naka.
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <<61.Kg1!> with the idea of 62.Bxg6 Qxg6 63.Rg3 would have been winning.>


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Yeah, and if Black tries 61...Nf8, 62.Rh3 is crushing (once again, the king isn't blocking the rook on g3).

It was also possible to win a piece with the direct <61.e6!> Qxe6 62.Rc7+ Kf8 63.Qh6+ Ke8 64.Qxh7 Kd8 (or 64...Qe2+) 65.Rc5 Qe2+, but an awful lot of calculation has to made in order to ensure Black doesn't get a perpetual this way. For example, in the above line it is essential to check on h6 on move 63 before taking on h7 because after [64.Qxh7] Qe2+ 65.Kg3 Rb3+ 66.Bxb3 Qe3+ 67.Kg4 Qe4+ 68.Kg5 Qf5+ 69.Kh6 Qh5+:


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The white king can escape to g7 and White wins, but with the black king on f8 it's mate.

Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: But apparently the move that finally blew away Carlsen's winning chances was <63.Qd8?>


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Here <63.Rf6!> should be winning - the idea is to push away the black queen from the defense of f6, so that after 63...Qe8 (63...Qe7 64.Bxg6! Nxg6 65.Rxg6+ wins the queen) 64.Rf2! White holds on to the initiative with Qf6+: 64...Ra2 (64...Qe6 65.Rh2!) 65.Qf6+ Kg8 66.Bb3! Rxa3 67.Rf3! and in order to defend against Bxd5 Black has to give up the exchange with 67...Rxb3.

Oct-27-10  visayanbraindoctor: This post properly belongs here.

Fascinating game, the Viking vs the Tiger.

If Carlsen wishes to have a serious shot at the Title, he should

1. Learn how to win won games like this as the attacker.

2. Learn to maximize drawing chances in bad positions like this, just as Anand did; and so actually manage to draw some of these games, if he is the defender.

Anand seemed to have played rather inaccurately in some parts of the game, but his stubbornness and great defense pulled off a draw.

Note that Anand seemed to have followed Capablanca's often quoted advise for defenders. Defend you King with the minimum number of pieces required, and place all your remaining pieces in positions where they have potential chances for a counter attack. Anand did precisely this. At first opportunity, he transferred his rook to White's second rank, where it had chances for counterattacks, while keeping his King defended with the two absolutely minimal number of pieces in order not to get mated, his Queen and Knight. He also placed his Knight on h7 where it had a chance for getting into a counter attack via g5.

Had Anand hunkered down with his Queen, Knight, and Rook trying to defend every weak square in his loose position Carlsen, superb attacker that he is, would no doubt have eventually found a way to crack Black's position.

Oct-27-10  outplayer: 33...Bf4
Oct-27-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Note that Anand seemed to have followed Capablanca's often quoted advise for defenders. Defend you King with the minimum number of pieces required, and place all your remaining pieces in positions where they have potential chances for a counter attack. Anand did precisely this. At first opportunity, he transferred his rook to White's second rank, where it had chances for counterattacks, while keeping his King defended with the two absolutely minimal number of pieces in order not to get mated, his Queen and Knight. He also placed his Knight on h7 where it had a chance for getting into a counter attack via g5.>

Interesting point. Here's a forcing computer-line which shows how Anand could have done it even better, before Carlsen got his winning chances on move 61 and then 63:


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<56...Rc1!> (instead of defending the pawn by ...Qd7) 57.Bxd5 Ng5!! 58.Rf2 Qc3+ 59.Kh2 Qe1 60.Qg3 Ne6! 61.Rf6 (61.Bxe6?? Qh1#) 61...Qe2+ 62.Bg2 Qh5+ 63.Qh3 Qxh3+ followed by 64...Nxd4 and the resulting endgame seems to be drawn.

Oct-28-10  anandrulez: After 19 . Bc7


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I mean thats classical case of White maintaining the tempo after Rook Trade . What / Where did Anand go wrong ? His opening was poor any comments ? These are 3 moves that were outright blunder - and I am clueless why Anand played it . 35. fxg4 , 37 ..Nf8 ? ..Rf8 looked precise
38 ..Kg8 ?? Qf6 was more precise .
Looking carefully these moves were played in time trouble . So really such dubious play vs Carlsen can just get you spanked .

Oct-28-10  anandrulez: This game reminds me of Topalov vs Anand, 2005 another totally lost game Anand saved out of the blue thanks to opponent mistakes .
Oct-28-10  visayanbraindoctor: Eyal: <<Note that Anand seemed to have followed Capablanca's often quoted advise for defenders. Defend you King with the minimum number of pieces required, and place all your remaining pieces in positions where they have potential chances for a counter attack. Anand did precisely this. At first opportunity, he transferred his rook to White's second rank, where it had chances for counterattacks, while keeping his King defended with the two absolutely minimal number of pieces in order not to get mated, his Queen and Knight. He also placed his Knight on h7 where it had a chance for getting into a counter attack via g5.>

Interesting point. Here's a forcing computer-line which shows how Anand could have done it even better, before Carlsen got his winning chances on move 61 and then 63:

<56...Rc1!> (instead of defending the pawn by ...Qd7) 57.Bxd5 Ng5!! 58.Rf2 Qc3+ 59.Kh2 Qe1 60.Qg3 Ne6! 61.Rf6 (61.Bxe6?? Qh1#) 61...Qe2+ 62.Bg2 Qh5+ 63.Qh3 Qxh3+ followed by 64...Nxd4 and the resulting endgame seems to be drawn.>

Thanks for pointing that out. Capablanca though might have found that move, even without a computer. It exactly follows his advise, and a study if his games shows that whenever he was defending, he was always on the look-out for precisely such moves. This trait made him very hard to beat.

I posted some links to defensive 'reverse brilliancies' in the Kramnik page if you're interested.

Oct-30-10  anandrulez: It is very interesting to note that Anand's 16 Qd8 was probably the tempo losing move in the game opening and Carlsen seems to have given it back by Qd8 !
Nov-02-10  LIFE Master AJ: <Oct-27-10
MTuraga: A fair result. I would say both played erroneously.>

Analysis please?

To be honest, its easy to make a statement like that. But let's back it up with some hard-core engine analysis. OK?

Dec-31-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Penguincw: First time Carlsen did not win with white at Pearl Spring.
May-22-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: <He's an incredible talent," said Anand, soon after being outplayed by Carlsen in round 7 (in Nanjing) from a dead-equal position and barely hanging on to a draw. "Some of the things he does, even Vlady [Kramnik], who is a great technician, can't do> - Viswanathan Anand.
Jun-02-15
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Magnus Carlsen: "What used to be perhaps my favorite game was my game with then-World Champion Anand from 2010, because in that game I felt like I created something out of nothing and it gave me a great deal of creative satisfaction Ė even though I didnít actually win the game."

http://www.chess.com/news/magnus-ca...

Jun-03-15  Oxnard: <cro777> I came here to post this exact thing! It's surely this game he's talking about... I remember watching this and the frustration of Carlsen not finding a way to win with such an initiative!
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