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Hikaru Nakamura vs Vladimir Kramnik
Tal Memorial (2010), Moscow RUS, rd 4, Nov-08
Russian Game: Nimzowitsch Attack (C42)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-08-10  Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 29 Qh4 is the centralization 29 Qe4, defending the c2 pawn so that 29...Qb1+ can be answered by 30 Ke2, and getting ready for the move Re6-e7 doubling Rooks on the seventh rank.
Nov-08-10  Albertan: According to Deep Rybka 4, Nakamura missed a winning continuation in this game! You can see this winning continuation, by going to this page on my blog:

http://albertan1956.blogspot.com/20...

Nov-08-10  BobCrisp: <Please observe our posting guidelines:

2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.>

Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Albertan: According to Deep Rybka 4, Nakamura missed a winning continuation in this game! You can see this winning continuation, by going to this page on my blog>

You're analysing a position that didn't exist in the game - as you can see from the score on this page, when Black played ...a4 his queen was on b2 (rather than b4), defending against Rxg7.

Apparently Nakamura did miss at least very good winning chances with both 23.Rhe1 (instead of Rd1) and 31/33.Ke2 (instead of Kd1).

Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: This opening looks like a Ruy Lopez Exchange with colors reversed. Needless to say Kramnik is probably the best player of the the Petrov ever.
Nov-08-10  yalie: no offense to the players, but I'd have loved to see Anand and Aronian play out the game [from about move 22).
Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: The Petrov can be explosive; don't write off Kramnik's use of it, as he makes continuous improvements to the main lines, which other players must find OTB.
Nov-08-10  Kinghunt: <yalie: no offense to the players, but I'd have loved to see Anand and Aronian play out the game [from about move 22).>

Aronian would find complications, Anand would push to win, Aronian would find a tactic Anand overlooked, and the game would end 0-1.

Nov-08-10  bartonlaos: <yalie: no offense to the players, but I'd have loved to see Anand and Aronian play out the game [from about move 22).>

Does that also include the same time-limitations at move 22?

Nov-08-10  oxxo: 23. Rhe1
Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Kramnik’s handling of the opening wasn’t very impressive here: after deviating from a game of his in Corus this year - F Caruana vs Kramnik, 2010 - where he equalized without much trouble with 11...Qa5 (followed by Ne5, an exchange of knights, and Be6), he got into hot water already with 15...Be6?! 16.Ng5! (note that 16.g4 is well met by 16…Qb8!). Instead, 15...Rxe1+ 16.Rxe1 c4, forcing the bishop either off the dangerous diagonal or off the board with exchanges - 17.Bf5 Bxf5 18.Qxf5 Qd6, seems to diffuse most of White’s initiative and lead to the kind of position that Kramnik can hold in his sleep, even if White has a tiny positional advantage.
Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: http://video.russiachess.org/browse...

Fischer would turn over in his grave, but I found this session highly informative, even though the players are forced to defer to the machine.

I like Kramnik's delayed reaction to the computer move Rxg7 announced at 19:10:27 and then 8 seconds or so later he says "What???" and cranes his neck with incredulity, then "Ahh! this is the trick. This is beautiful."

Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  tamar: Oh, I see this position is the one <Eyal> mentioned. Very easy to get confused in these postmortems.
Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <tamar> Yes, they played a kind of open/tactical game in which computers reign supreme, and so there are many remarkable “computer ideas” which both players missed in their lines of analysis – sometimes mentioned during the post-mortem and sometimes not. To recap some lines I’ve posted on the tournament and Nakamura pages:

24.Re7 (instead of Nakamura’s 24.Rxd5) – a move Kramnik said he couldn’t find a good defense against - 24...Bxb2+ 25.Kb1 (25.Kxb2 Qb4+ followed by Qxe7) 25...Bg7!! (What?!) 26.Rxg7+ Kxg7 27.Qd7+ Kxg6 and apparently it boils down to perpetual by either White or Black; same goes for 26.Qe6+ Kh8 27.Rxg7 Qb4+.

27...Qb1+ (instead of Kramnik’s 27...a5) 28.Kd2 (a losing move according to the computer – the counter-intuitive 28.Ke2 is actually necessary to bring the king to safety) 28...Rac8 29.Re4, and here they were unsure what to make of it after 29...a5. Both missed the winning shot for Black, 29...b5!!

31.Ke2 (instead of Nakamura’s 31.Kd1) 31...Rae8 32.Rxg7!! (What?!) 32...Rxe6+ (or 32...Kxg7 33.Qd4+) 33.Bxe6! Qxh4 34.Rh7#. And a very similar motif a couple of minutes later:

31.Ke2 Qc3 32.Re4 (removing the rook from the bishop’s diagonal creates the threat of 33.Qxh6+! Bxh6 34.Rh7#) 32...Qxc2+ 33.Kf1 Qc1+ 34.Re1 Qf4, and here they both assumed that White has to exchange queens, and missed the winning shot 35.Rxg7!! again with a threat of mate on h7; 35...Kxg7 also leads to mate after 36.Re7+.

Nov-08-10  patzer2: Perhaps 23. Rhe1! would have improved Nakamura's attacking chances.

One possibility is 23. Rhe1 Kh8 24. Re7 Qd6 25. f3 , when play might continue 25...a6 26. Be8 c3 27. Kb1 d4 28. Qe6 Qxe6 29. R7xe6 cxb2 30. Bf7 d3 31. cxd3 Ra8 32. f4! Rxd3? (32...Bc3 33. Rd1 ) 33. f5 Bc3 34. f6! .

Nov-08-10  patzer2: After 31. Ke2 b5! 32. Rxg7! Qxc4+! 33. Qxc4 bxc4 34. Rh7+ seems to me Black has practical drawing chances.
Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <patzer2: Perhaps 23. Rhe1! would have improved Nakamura's attacking chances. One possibility is 23. Rhe1 Kh8 24. Re7 Qd6 [etc.]>

Yes, a crucial point here is that after 23.Rhe1, Black cannot get the same Q-side counterplay with 23...Qa5 which he gets in the game:


click for larger view

because of 24.Re7! with the threat of 25.Rxg7+! Kxg7 26.Re7+ and mate; it also prepares Be8(-f7+) ideas.

Correct timing of ...Qa5 was quite an important issue in this game; for example, a couple of moves earlier, after 21.h5:


click for larger view

21...Qa5 would run into 22.Rxg6! (22.a4? Rxf2) 22...hxg6 23.Qe6+ Rf7 24.hxg6; or 22...Rf7 23.Rxg7+! Rxg7 24.Qe6+ Kf8 (24...Kh8 25.h6) 25.Rh3 and it looks awful for Black (Nakamura mentioned it in the post-mortem, but Kramnik refused to take it seriously as a practical option), even though a computer can grovel here for a while. Strangely enough, though, after 22...Qc7 it might be objectively better than what Black got in the actual game.

Nov-08-10  patzer2: The surprise position in the post-game analysis of 31. Ke2 Qc3? (better is 31...b5! ) 32. Re4 Qxc2+ 33. Kf1 Qc1+ 34. Re1 Qf4 is shown below:


click for larger view

Here 35. Rxg7!! is the move both super GMs missed in their display board analysis of the position as leading to mate.

P.S.: Apparently even super GMs occasinally miss winning tactics computers quickly find.

Nov-08-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  kamalakanta: Nakamura will probably say in one of his blogs that his mistake was "unforgivable"...

That being said, he is a great talent, and has the potential to be no. 1, in my opinion. His game is maturing quite quickly.

Nov-08-10  crazybird: The great thing about Nakamura is that he is not overawed by anybody. Arguably, the most fearless player in the game.
Nov-09-10  Chess Network: Nakamura vs Kramnik - Tal Memorial Chess Tournament 2010 VIDEO :) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6Zq...
Nov-09-10  jrlepage: <kamalakanta: Nakamura will probably say in one of his blogs that his mistake was "unforgivable"... That being said, he is a great talent, and has the potential to be no. 1, in my opinion. His game is maturing quite quickly.>

Couldn't agree more. No. 1, who knows. But top 5 stuff for many, many years I'd guess. The guy's got that ever inspiring killer instinct.

Nov-09-10  Ulhumbrus: On 23 Rhe1 ( instead of 23 Rd1 as played) 23...Qa5 24 Re7 Qxb5 25 Rxg7 Kxg7 26 Re7+ Kf6 one possible way to win is 27 Re6+ Kg7 28 Qd4+ Kg8 29 Re7

On 30 Ke2 ( instead of 30 Kd2 as played) Rae8 31 Rxg7 Rxe6+ 32 Bxe6 an alternative to 32...Qxh4?? which allows 33 Rh7 mate is 32...Qb5+ followed by 33...Kxg7 or the fork 33...Qe5+ of White allows it.

On 31 Ke2 ( instead of 31 Kd2 as played) Qc3 32 Re4 Qxc2+ 33 Kf1 Qc1+ 34 Re1 an alternative to 34...Qf4 is 34...Qg5 so that on 35 Rxg7 Kxg7 36 Re7+ Kxg6 37 Bd3+ the Black King can come to f6 by 37...Kf6. Then one possible way to win is 38 Qe4 (threatening 39 Qe6 mate) 38...Ra6 39 f4 Qh5 40 Re5 Qg4 41 Rf5+ Kg7 42 Qe7+

Nov-09-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <On 31 Ke2 ( instead of 31 Kd2 [Kd1] as played) Rae8 32 Rxg7 Rxe6+ 33 Bxe6 an alternative to 33...Qxh4?? which allows 34 Rh7 mate is 33...Qb5+ followed by 34...Kxg7>

It also loses, only less spectacularly, to 34.Kd2! Kxg7 (34...Qa5+ 35.c3 doesn’t help) 35.Qe7+ Kxg6 36.Qxf8; as this line makes clear, White just has to take care not to let the black queen reach through checking a square from where it can defend e7, as after 34.Kf2?? Qc5+.

<On 31 Ke2 ( instead of 31 Kd2 [Kd1] as played) Qc3 32 Re4 Qxc2+ 33 Kf1 Qc1+ 34 Re1 an alternative to 34...Qf4 is 34...Qg5 so that on 35 Rxg7 Kxg7 36 Re7+ Kxg6 37 Bd3+ the Black King can come to f6 by 37...Kf6. Then one possible way to win is 38 Qe4 (threatening 39 Qe6 mate) 38...Ra6 39 f4 Qh5 40 Re5 Qg4 41 Rf5+ Kg7 42 Qe7+>

In fact, 39.f4?? loses to 39...Qxf4+! 40.Qxf4+ Kxe7. The most efficient way to win is 37.Qe4+ Rf5 38.g4 (or 37...Kh5 38.Re5; 37...Qf5 38.Qd4! Rg8 39.Bd3); or simply to exchange queens on g5 and play Ree7. Since both 34...Qf4 and 34...Qg5 are busted, and if the queen leaves the c1-h6 diagonal Black is mated in two by Qxh6+, it’s clear that Black is lost.

As <patzer2> already noted (and the engines clearly show), in case of 31.Ke2 the only way for Black to keep fighting is to simplify into an inferior (double) rook endgame by 31...b5(!) 32.Rxg7 Qxc4+ 33.Qxc4 bxc4. Otherwise, White's attack is too strong.

Nov-09-10  kellmano: Very enjoyable video <Tamar>

Naka is not that arrogant when doing a post-mortem with Krammers.

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