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Boris Gelfand vs Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
Tal Memorial (2010), Moscow RUS, rd 9, Nov-14
English Opening: Anglo-Indian Defense. King's Indian Formation (A15)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Nov-14-10  onur87: why mamed give the center so simply? i cant understand.
Nov-14-10  Marmot PFL: Maybe Shak would have explained it if he hadn't left the building. 21...Bh6 22 Bxh6 Qxf2+ 23 Kh1 Rf5 looked like a good alternative to the game.
Nov-14-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gilmoy: <14.h4> is a heck of a plan: Gelfand boldly ignores the Ba6's baleful eye on f1, and offers to half-open f for Black's heavy pieces. The deep point is to <weaken e6>, daring Shak to find a win by force before White's central lahar falls down the mountain.

<22..g4 23..Nf3+> looks like Shak is already seek complications to confuse a losing position. The f3-pawn is simply overextended, and White easily doubles on it.

After <38.Rc7> White's Rd4 is already ideal: 38..R8f7 39.Rxe7! Rxe7 40.d6 queens (Rd7 41.e6 gives <2CPP6>)(Re8 41.d7 Rd8 42.e6 threatens 2CPP7).

If 36..R5f7 37.e6 Rg7+ 38.Kh3 <stops the h-pawn; White's pawns don't need any further support> Kg8 39.f5! <sees-f6. White's threat of 2CPP6 essentially gives Black weak back rank, hence the R*8 cannot leave 8. Black must play some waiting move, e.g.> b4 <39..Rxf5? 40.Rxf7! transposing> 40.d6 exd6 41.e7! Re8 42.f6 Rf7 43.Rxd6 .

Nov-14-10  rilkefan: "A lahar is a type of mudflow or debris flow composed of pyroclastic material, rocky debris, and water."
Nov-14-10  perkychesscat: Why didn't Mamedyarov play 26..RxB, and then

27 pxB Qg4check
28 Kf1 Qg2check
29 Ke1 Qg1 check and wins the rook

What am I overlooking?

Nov-15-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  bright1: < perkychesscat: Why didn't Mamedyarov play 26..RxB, and then

27 pxB Qg4check
28 Kf1 Qg2check
29 Ke1 Qg1 check and wins the rook
>

30. Qd3-f1

Nov-15-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: Black could have won back the ♙ with 28...Qg4 (threatening 29...Bxe5) 29. Qe3 Rxd4. More interesting is 29. Kg2 Rf5 30. Qe3 Rh5 31. Rh1 (to prevent 31...Qh3+, with mate to follow) Rxh1 32. Kxh1 Rf8 33. Kg2 Rf5, with 34...Rh5 to follow.
Nov-15-10  woody b: what about 28... Rxd4?
Nov-15-10  polarmis: Sergey Shipov: http://www.chessintranslation.com/2...

<A brief summary of the game: Black conceded the centre to White, but forgot to counterattack it. And died by suffocation. But if you want more details There were, it has to be said, a lot of mistakes. The players were clearly no longer capable of fathoming the numerous tactical nuances and were playing based on general ideas which often let you down.

I can point to one particular theme: Black was too late in dispatching the bishop to h6. On the 21st and 23rd move the continuation Bg7-h6! gave Black equal chances. In the game, however, he played it on the 28th move, when White had already taken complete control of the situation. Well done, Gelfand! Better a win late than never.>

Actually Mamedyarov said afterwards that he'd seen the drawing ideas but thought he was better so tried to play for a win... He wasn't too happy about giving up the chance to be the sole winner of the Tal Memorial!

Nov-15-10  DAVI DE RAFE: gelfand mamedyarvinte atthhazham mudakki
Nov-15-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <woody b: what about 28... Rxd4?>

Yes, that's much simpler. I'm not sure black is comfortable though after 29. Qxd4 Qxf3 30. Qd7 Qa3.

Nov-15-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <More interesting is [28...Qg4] 29. Kg2 Rf5 30. Qe3 Rh5 31. Rh1 (to prevent 31...Qh3+, with mate to follow) Rxh1 32. Kxh1 Rf8 33. Kg2 Rf5, with 34...Rh5 to follow.>

In this line, after 32.Kxh1 it would be the time to play ...Rxd4; but the move 30.Qe3 here is really a pure waste of time - White can simply refute the idea by 30.Rh1.

In case of 28...Rxd4 29.Qxd4 Qxf3 30.Qd7 or Rc1 the initiative is clearly White's, but it probably isn't worse for Black than the actual game.

Nov-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Eyal: [28...Qg4] 29. Kg2 Rf5, etc. In this line, after 32.Kxh1 it would be the time to play ...Rxd4; but the move 30.Qe3 here is really a pure waste of time - White can simply refute the idea by 30.Rh1.>

I'm not sure about that. Black can play 30...e6, threatening 31...Bxe5 (the immediate 30...Bxe5 is foiled by 31. Qc4+). So what does white do then if not 31...Qe3 ? If 31. Qa6, then 31...Rf7. If 31. Rh4, then 31...Qg6 32. Qa6 Rf7. White probably wins the endgame, but it's no worse than what was played.

Nov-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <I'm not sure about that. Black can play 30...e6, threatening 31...Bxe5 (the immediate 30...Bxe5 is foiled by 31. Qc4+). So what does white do then if not 31...Qe3 ? If 31. Qa6, then 31...Rf7. If 31. Rh4, then 31...Qg6 32. Qa6 Rf7. White probably wins the endgame, but it's no worse than what was played.>

First, 30Bxe5 isnt a threat anyway, even without the queen check, because White simply recaptures with the bishop (the rook on f3 is defended twice), so Qe3 isnt necessary or especially useful on move 31 either. Second, even if it was, its not the same as playing it on move 30, because with 30.Rh1 White prevents Rh5. After 30...e6 best may be 31.Rh4 Qg6 32.Bc1, to exchange pieces (<now> 32Bxe5?? Is foiled by 33.Rxf5 exf5 34.Qc4+). Btw, "no worse than in the game" is probably good enough for White anyway, because by move 28 hes winning; as was already noted, Black missed his drawing chances with Bh6 on move 21 or 23.

Nov-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: ...Maybe the idea was 30...Bxe5 31.Bxe5 Rxe5, but with the rook on h1 it's unplayable because of mate on h7.
Nov-16-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: <Eyal: First, 30Bxe5 isnt a threat anyway, even without the queen check, because White simply recaptures with the bishop.> You're right. My mistake.

You're right on all counts. So black really didn't have anything in the position.

Nov-21-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Domdaniel: The ...Bxe5 idea also fails on move 27: 27...Bxe5 28.Qc4+ Rf7 29.g4! embarrassing the queen and ultimately winning a piece.

29...Qxg4+ 30.Rg3
or 29...Qh4 30.Bxe5 (or 30.Bg3)
and
29...Qg6 30.Bxe5 wins.

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