chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen
London Chess Classic (2010), London ENG, rd 3, Dec-10
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Breyer Defense Zaitsev Hybrid (C95)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 16 times; par: 107 [what's this?]

Annotations by Stockfish (Computer).      [23014 more games annotated by Stockfish]

Get this game explained with Decode Chess
explore this opening
find similar games 130 more Anand/Carlsen games
PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: All games have a Kibitzer's Corner provided for community discussion. If you have a question or comment about this game, register a free account so you can post there.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

THIS IS A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE.   [CLICK HERE] FOR ORIGINAL.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-10-10  amolv: First!
Dec-10-10  Ragh: Great game from the World Champion Vishy Anand!

There was a two-fold repetition occurring after white's 38th and 40th moves, leading to believe that a draw is in order, but both the players were simply scrambling to get to reach the allotted time on the clock for 40 moves.

Dec-10-10  anandrulez: Opening was rather lousy from WC and it was lost or nearly -1 in a well known ( and recently discussed Breyer system) . Anand played the middle game better than Carlsen . At the press conf Carlsen said that game was decided virtually in one move Be4 and that he was playing for the advantage till then . It was surpring Anand didnt have a clear plan after d5 ! I wonder what went wrong or what went right with Carlsens opening prep - maybe stronger engines with Magnus ? . Further Anand said that he though Bxc4 was not good while engines thought that was better than Nxc4 ! I mean his White opening really needs to be improved .
Dec-10-10  anandrulez: Shipov comment :
For Carlsen it’s a particularly annoying and painful loss because he introduced an excellent opening idea. With its help he (as Black!) got a completely comfortable edge and, according to the logic of events, should have increased it without any particular risk, but… What happened to the Kid in the middle of the game is a mystery for me. He conducted the game very poorly in the complications, continually miscalculating and got himself into a lost position. In principle Vishy won’t be too proud of this game either. He didn’t convert his advantage optimally, more than once letting his prey slip from his grasp. Well, that’s chess, a struggle of living people, who tire and occasionally make mistakes… I’m grateful to the public for its long-suffering patience and attention. Working for you has been Grandmaster Sergey Shipov
Dec-10-10  Hesam7: Well Carlsen's mistake was 24. ... Be4?. This is Rybka 4:


click for larger view

24. ... Qe6 25. Ncd6 Rc5 26. Nxb7 Rxf5 27. Bc3 Rb5 28. Qf3 Qb6 29. Na5 Qc7 30. Qd3 Nc5 31. Qc4 Qd6 32. Qe2 Qd3 33. Qxd3 Nxd3 34. Bd4 Rd5 35. Be3 Ne5 36. Bf4 Rybka Aquarium (0:08:31) -0.96|d20 Black has the upper hand.

Dec-10-10  Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 18 exd5 is 18 Nxe5

An alternative to 22 Nxd4 is 22 Na5

An alternative to 24...Ne4 is 24...Nc5 eg 25 Qd4 Rd8 26 Qg4 Qe4

After 26 Nd6 Black's KB is overworked. If it has to defend g7, it cannot take the N which forks Black's Q, R and B.

An alternative to 42 Kh2 is 42 Rd7 centralizing all three of White's pieces

Dec-10-10  anandrulez: I checked qe6 with Rybka and it appeared that White could just stop the advance of a pawn with Be1 and Ra1 . It seems black cant make much progress in that line . Be4 was the blunder form Magnus in a complex position and Rc2 clinched the game for WC .
Dec-10-10  Hesam7: Another interesting point was that after the game while commenting on the position after 25. Qd4:


click for larger view

Carlsen said initially he wanted to play 25. ... Qe6 but realized that after 26. Ncd6 Nc5 27. Nxc8 Nb3 28. Qd8 Bxf5 29. Ba3 Qxc8 30. Rd1 he would lose. But it seems that Carlsen's continuation is worse! Again this is Rybka 4:

25. ... Qe6 26. Ncd6 Rb8 27. Re1 Bxf5 28. Rxe6 Bxe6 29. Bc3 Nf6 30. Ne4 Nxe4 31. Qxe4 h6 32. Kh2 Rb3 33. Qc6 Ra3 34. Qc7 Ra4 35. Qd8 Rc4 36. Qd3 Rc6 37. g4 Bd6+ 38. Kg2 Be7 Rybka Aquarium (0:04:19) +0.00|d21 equal chances

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: As far as the opening is concerned, they've played this Breyer line recently in

Anand vs Carlsen, 2010 (with the sharp 15.b4 Nb6 16.axb5 <cxb5>)

and Anand vs Carlsen, 2010 (with the quieter 16.axb5 axb5)

I'm sure Anand had something prepared for both these sequences, but Carlsen apparently managed to confuse him with the novelty <15...Rc8!?> (instead of Nb6). Note that in comparison to the Bilbao game, White didn't manage to shut the position with d5, and therefore Carlsen could play the breakthrough in the centre. Anand took a gamble with the sharp pawn sac and managed to outplay Carlsen in the resulting complications.

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Hesam7: Well Carlsen's mistake was 24. ... Be4?>

That's apparently the mistake that made his advantage go away. But the losing mistake (or at least the first of those, since Anand missed a couple of forced wins...) was probably 27...f6:


click for larger view

Here, both 27...Nf6 and Qf6 lead to rather miserable endgames (with White picking up the a6 pawn and Black's pawns doubled on the f-file). So it was probably best to play the somewhat counter-intuitive <27...Rc6!> - giving up the g7 pawn, but holding on to a6 and defending against Nh6+; 28.Nxg7 Qf6 doesn't look too bad for Black. And in case of 28.Rd1, the knight on d7 can be indirectly defended by 28...Re6! (29.Qxd7? Re1+!). Whereas after 27...f6 28.Rd1:


click for larger view

Black could also try 28...Rc7, but this is so passive after 29.Qd5+ Kh8 30.Qf7 (with ideas of Ba3, for example), that even if a computer can somehow grovel on here it's hard to believe it can be held in practice.

Dec-10-10  Hesam7: <Eyal: I'm sure Anand had something prepared for both these sequences, but Carlsen apparently managed to confuse him with the novelty <15...Rc8!?> (instead of Nb6). Note that in comparison to the Bilbao game, White didn't manage to shut the position with d5, and therefore Carlsen could play the breakthrough in the centre.>

One of Rybka 4's improvements for Anand is 16. Bb2 (instead of 16. axb5) teh line goes on: 16. ... Nb6 17. axb5 cxb5 18. d5 Nh5


click for larger view

19. Nb3 Nf4 20. Na5 Qd7 21. Nxb7 Nxd3 22. Qxd3 Qxb7 23. Nh4 Na4 24. Re2 Rybka Aquarium (0:07:07) +0.11|d17 equal chances.

Now compare the above diagram with the position in Anand vs Carlsen, 2010 after 18. ... Nh5:


click for larger view

Dec-10-10  Hesam7: <Eyal: But the losing mistake (or at least the first of those, since Anand missed a couple of forced wins...) was probably 27...f6>

I can't find a win after 28. ... Rc7:


click for larger view

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <In principle Vishy won’t be too proud of this game either. He didn’t convert his advantage optimally, more than once letting his prey slip from his grasp.> (Shipov)

After 32...Qf8:


click for larger view

Anand had a forced win with <33.Rf7!> - for example, 33...Qb8 34.Re7 (aiming for Re8) 34...Rc8 35.Rxg7! (this wouldn't have worked on the previous move because of ...Rxb2); 33...Qg8 34.Bxf6!; 33...Qc8 34.Qe7 Rc1+ 35.Kh2! (35.Bxc1?? Qxc1+ with perpetual) 35...Qb8+ 36.g3 and no more checks.

Then, with Carlsen failing to play 34...Rc8, Anand had another forced win after 35...Qg8:


click for larger view

with the elegant <36.Bc5!>, cutting off the black rook from the back rank and creating the threat of Qb6 and Rd8; if 36...Re2 then 37.Be7! again with the decisive threat of Rd8.

Dec-10-10  percyblakeney: This game should clinch Anand's seventh Chess Oscar since Carlsen has been his main competitor. The latter would have needed a top result in London to have a chance, if even that would have been enough.
Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: ...Of course, even after Anand missed a couple of forced wins, Carlsen's utterly passive position was still very difficult to hold for long. It seems that his final collapse came somewhere along moves 68-70 - 68...Rb8 moves the rook away from the K-side (Re6 was probably more accurate), and 70...Re8 finally gives up the f6 pawn. It could still be defended with 70...Kg8 - the idea being 71.Rc6 Qf7! 72.Bxf6 Rf8 (and Bxg7 isn't played with check). Even after losing this pawn, Carlsen probably could have put up a tougher resistance, but he may have been exhausted, or just wanted to end this nightmare.

Btw, note that the "pinning" 75...Qb7 is a little bluff: if after 76.Qxh6 Black plays 76...Rc8:


click for larger view

It loses the rook to 77.Qf6+ Kg8 78.Qe6+.

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: PS After <33.Rf7!>, another winning line worth mentioning, which may not be so easy to calculate, is 33...Qc8 34.Qe7 Rxb2 35.Rxg7 Qc1+ 37.Kh2 Qf4+ 38.Rg3! (without this resource, White gets mated):


click for larger view

with the white rook playing a crucial role as both defender and attacker.

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Hesam7: I can't find a win after 28. ... Rc7>


click for larger view

Here's a nice winning line given by Golubev on chesspro: 29.Qd5+ Kh8 30.Qf7 a5 31.Ba3! Qc8 32.Re1 Nc5 33.Re8 Rxf7 34.Rxc8 Nd7 (34...Ne6 35.Nd4!! Nxd4 36.Bxf8 h6 37.Bc5+ Kh7 38.Bxd4 winning a piece) 35.Rd8! with the idea 36.Bxf8 Nxf8 37.Nd6 winning the exchange, and then the a-pawn (35...Kg8 doesn't help, because of 36.Ne7+).

Chessok’s Rybka suggests 30...h6 for Black – and indeed, if he has ...Kh7, the tactics in those lines doesn't work. But I see that <frogbert> posted on the Carlsen page a winning line starting with 31.Rd4 Qb8 32.Nxh6 (32…gxh6 33.Rg4 and mate on g7 or g8) – Black can surprisingly hold on for a while by some tactical miracles after 32…Bc5, but he’s crushed eventually. (Magnus Carlsen)

Dec-10-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <70...Re8 finally gives up the f6 pawn. It could still be defended with 70...Kg8 - the idea being 71.Rc6 Qf7! 72.Bxf6 Rf8 (and Bxg7 isn't played with check).>

Actually, it doesn't save the pawn: White has 71.Ba7! Ra8 (71...Re8 72.Bc5, trapping the queen; 71...Rd8 72.Bc5 Qe8 73.Be7 and Bxf6) 72.Bc5 Qe8 (72...Qd8 73.Be7 and Bxf6) 73.Qf3! (threatening Qg4) Kh8 74.Be7 etc. (54...Qf7/g6 would leave the rook on a8 hanging).

This illustrates quite well how miserable is Black’s position by this stage. So actually it’s quite difficult to point out the exact moment when this position becomes hopeless. Maybe it was basically lost throughout all the later stages of the game, and Carlsen didn’t commit any crucial mistakes after the time control (or, in fact, after 27…f6).

Dec-10-10  James Bowman: <anandrulez: Shipov comment>

Thanks for Shipovs commentary Im glad to hear him say it as it looked to me like Vishy was at a loss as how to finish it off, wandering about sorta lost. Maybe he had two many ideas and couldn't settle on one in particular.

Carsen is looking a bit flat again, maybe we will see him put out a better game with Nakamura, bit of a rivalry between them these days, probably the most anticipated game for many.

Dec-11-10  Hesam7: <Eyal: <Hesam7: I can't find a win after 28. ... Rc7>

Here's a nice winning line given by Golubev on chesspro: 29.Qd5+ Kh8 30.Qf7 a5 31.Ba3! Qc8 32.Re1 Nc5 33.Re8 Rxf7 34.Rxc8 Nd7 (34...Ne6 35.Nd4!! Nxd4 36.Bxf8 h6 37.Bc5+ Kh7 38.Bxd4 winning a piece) 35.Rd8! with the idea 36.Bxf8 Nxf8 37.Nd6 winning the exchange, and then the a-pawn (35...Kg8 doesn't help, because of 36.Ne7+).

Chessok’s Rybka suggests 30...h6 for Black – and indeed, if he has ...Kh7, the tactics in those lines doesn't work. But I see that <frogbert> posted on the Carlsen page a winning line starting with 31.Rd4 Qb8 32.Nxh6 (32…gxh6 33.Rg4 and mate on g7 or g8) – Black can surprisingly hold on for a while by some tactical miracles after 32…Bc5, but he’s crushed eventually>

After 28. ... Rc7 29. Qd5+ Kh8 30. Qf7 h6 31. Rd4:


click for larger view

Stockfish 1.9.1 gives the following @ depth 30:

31. ... Qb8 32. Nxh6 Bc5 33. Nf5 Nf8 34. Rh4+ Nh7 35. Qg6 Bxf2+ 36. Kxf2 Qxb2+ 37. Kg1 Rc1+ 38. Kh2 Qb8+ 39. Ng3 Qg8 40. Ne2 Rf1 41. Nf4 Rxf4 42. Rxf4 Qb8 43. Qg3 Qb5 44. Rh4 Kg8 45. Qc7 Ng5 46. Qc4+ Kf8 47. Qxb5 axb5 48. Rb4 (+2.82).

That is exactly <frogbert>'s line up until 40. ... Rf1. The ending at the end should be winning for White.

Dec-11-10  Hesam7: I guess we can summarize the turning points:

24. ... Be4? = (24. ... Qe6 )
27. ... f6? (27. ... Rc6 =)

After 27. ... f6 White made several mistakes yet he was winning all the time. It just took him 50 moves to achieve it.

Dec-11-10  PokerPro: I dont understand the following moves..can someone please kindly explain them to me...Thank you..Moves 9.h3,9..Nb8 12..Re8 and 14.Bd3...
Dec-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Hesam7: I guess we can summarize the turning points:

24. ... Be4? = (24. ... Qe6 )
27. ... f6? (27. ... Rc6 =)>

Looking at the post-mortem with the players after the game (video 3.5 in http://www.londonchessclassic.com/, starting from about 20:00 - highly recommended), it's quite clear that Carlsen was really rattled during the game when he realized the mistake he's made with 24...Be4; for some reason he was counting only on 25.Nh6+ gxh6 26.Qd4 f6 27.Re1 Bc5 28.Qxe4 Qxe4 29.Rxe4, with a difficult endgame for White [Anand says that "he didn't see it at all":-)]. So he had to make a very quick mental switch from playing for an advantage and a win to prudently playing for a draw, and apparently he didn't handle it well.

Dec-11-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Speaking of the post-mortem, here are some more interesting lines mentioned with regard to critical points in the game:


click for larger view

Here Anand mentions 24...Qe6 25.Ncd6 as better for Black, though he wasn’t sure how much – instead of the forcing 25...Rc5, he mentions 25...Rb8, where White cannot regain the pawn - 26.Nxb7 Rxb7 27.Rxa6 loses to 27...Nc5.


click for larger view

Here he gives a nice line to refute 26…Qe6: 27.Nxc8 Nc5 28.Ba3! Nb3 (28...Qxc8 29.Rc1) 29.Qd8 Qxc8 30.Rd1! – and Black can’t do anything to prevent the exchange of queens and the entry of the white rook to the back rank, leaving White an exchange up.


click for larger view

With regard to 28…Rc7, it seems that after the rather obvious sequence 29.Qd5+ Kh8 30.Qf7 the players focused mainly on 30...Qc8 – Anand gives 31.Nh6 (31...gxh6? 32.Rxd7 and 33.Bxf6+) and says he couldn’t find anything clear after a bishop move to c5 or b4, but that Carlsen told him after the game that 32.Qe6 should win, which is indeed confirmed by the engine: 31...Bc5 32.Qe6 and the threat of Nf7+ (and then inflicting some damage by discovered check) is decisive. 31...Bb4 is a bit more interesting, since it allows 32.Qe6 Nc5; White can win here by 33.Qg4! threatening both Qxb4 and Nf7+ followed by Rd8+, and Black can’t exchange queens because of mate on d8. Sample lines are 33...Qf8 34.Qxb4 gxh6 35.Bxf6+! Qxf6 36.Qb8+ and Qxc7, or 33...Rd7 34.Rxd7 Nxd7 (34…Qd7 35.Qxb4 gxh6 36.Bxf6+) 35.Qe6! and again the threat of Nf7+ is decisive (35…Nb6 36.Qxb6, and the knight on h6 is still untouchable because of Bxf6+).

Besides such concrete lines, which can be easily checked with an engine, it’s very interesting to hear the players (well, mainly Anand – Carlsen isn’t very talkative for obvious reasons) evaluating various possible endgames that could have turned up – e.g., Black’s chances of setting up a fortress in case of 31.Rxd7 Qxd7 32.Qxd7 Rxb2.

Dec-11-10  Hesam7: <Eyal> I think based on your postings on this page one could write a full analysis of this game with no difficulty!

Another point I like to mention is that I really like Black's position in Breyer (say after 13. ... Bf8). The problem is whenever I meet 1. e4 with 1. ... e5 most of my opponents avoid the main line. They play almost everything else: King's gambit, Scotch, Bishop's opening, 3. Bc4, the exchange Lopez, .... and I don't like to play Black in those sidelines (except 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6).

search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 1 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>

NOTE: Create an account today to post replies and access other powerful features which are available only to registered users. Becoming a member is free, anonymous, and takes less than 1 minute! If you already have a username, then simply login login under your username now to join the discussion.

Please observe our posting guidelines:

  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate, or gibberish posts.
  3. No vitriolic or systematic personal attacks against other members.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No cyberstalking or malicious posting of negative or private information (doxing/doxxing) of members.
  6. No trolling.
  7. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by moderators, create a false impression of consensus or support, or stage conversations, is prohibited.

Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.

Blow the Whistle

See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a moderator.


NOTE: Please keep all discussion on-topic. This forum is for this specific game only. To discuss chess or this site in general, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.
All moderator actions taken are ultimately at the sole discretion of the administration.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
Game collection: CL
by parmetd
anand's ruylopez with black
by senankit
Book of Samurai's favorite games 7
by Book of Samurai
Carlsen vs. the World Champions Decisive Games
by visayanbraindoctor
Vishy played for the win (because he miss analyzed it).
from RLC Round Up by Fredthebear by fredthebear
tfg44 - C94 - Spanish Closed
by tfg44
Games for study
by ozmikey
Chess Network Videos
by Penguincw
29. ouchhh
from Soñar no cuesta nada by Chess Guevara
Anand vs World Champs decisive games+ vs Asians
by visayanbraindoctor
Classic Anand
by amadeus

Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC