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Emanuel Lasker vs Harold Phillips / Arnold Denker / Joseph Platz
Clock simul, 2b (1938) (exhibition), Manhattan CC, New York, NY USA, Jan-20
Spanish Game: Morphy Defense. Steinitz Deferred (C79)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-03-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: This was played at the Manhattan Chess Club on January 20, 1938. The Allies were Harold Meyer Phillips, Arnold Denker, and Dr. Joseph Platz. No easy task for Lasker!

He indulges in a positional exchange sacrifice to tie up Black's pieces. The final position was adjudicated as a win for White by Isaac Kashdan, but it would be interesting to learn what the Silicon Judges think.

Lasker played a second consultation game at the same time against the team of Leonard B. Meyer, Robert Willman, and James R Newman, losing that one on time.

Report by Hermann Helms in the <Brooklyn Daily Eagle>, January 27,1938 http://fultonhistory.com/Newspaper%...

Mar-10-12  thomastonk: <Phony Benoni: The final position was adjudicated as a win for White by Isaac Kashdan, but it would be interesting to learn what the Silicon Judges think.>

This is a clear win - with and without a silicon friend: 41.Rxh7 Kf8 (after Rc8 White catches f7, f6 and c6) 42.Rh8+ Kg7 (Ke7 can be answered with h4 or a7, both simple wins) 43.Rd8 paralyses Black's position completely, and White can still improve his position: the knight can be transferred, say, to f5 and the king side pawns cannot be stopped.

Aug-15-12  Gouvaneur: A very fine win by Lasker, who by then was already quite old. A Patzer would never play a move like 15.axb5!, winning two pawns for the exchange, but move his rook instantly after it being attacked. Following that it was just masterly play, leaving Black no counterplay and slowly crushing him.
Aug-27-13  jerseybob: Interesting to see Denker, a strong enough player to go one-on-one against Grandmasters, joining a consultation team. And embarassing to be adjudicated a loser by his rival Kashdan. I agree with Kash's verdict.
Aug-27-13  JimNorCal: In the final few moves, it dawns on Black that he can't move the c8 rook to protect his h-pawn because of Nxc6+ with a fork.

It is amusing to watch white lift the rook to the h-file in a leisurely fashion. In the meantime, Black frantically re-organizes his pieces... but too late.

Sep-15-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <This is a clear win - with and without a silicon friend: 41.Rxh7 Kf8 (after Rc8 White catches f7, f6 and c6) 42.Rh8+ Kg7 (Ke7 can be answered with h4 or a7, both simple wins) 43.Rd8 paralyses Black's position completely>

It struck me that <39...Rcc7 40.Rh5 Ra8> was aimless play on Black's part, so I checked the original score, from the <BDE>, January 27th, 1938, and <39...QR-B2 40.R-R5 R-R> confirms that the eminently sensible <39...Rac7 40.Rh5 Rh8> was actually played. White must surely still be winning but there's work to do.

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