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Ruslan Ponomariov vs Vassily Ivanchuk
World Cup (2011), Khanty-Mansiysk RUS, rd 7, Sep-17
Queen's Gambit Declined: Vienna Variation (D39)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 7 OF 7 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-17-11  MindCtrol9: <37. ...Bxf3> or I am blind?
Sep-17-11  talisman: ♘e2+ wins
Sep-17-11  Jeffsteeven: Rxf5 is a big mistake
Sep-17-11  Cemoblanca: 39...Rh2+ 40.Kg1 Ne2+ 41.Rxe2 Rhg2+! 42.Kh1 Rxe2.
Sep-17-11  MindCtrol9: That is the way
Sep-17-11  leonn0077: i'm surprised white hasn't resigned yet
Sep-17-11  talisman: <Jeffsteeven> your right...now white has only one move and it loses.
Sep-17-11  Cemoblanca: Nice game Chucky! Congrats! I'm off now! Have a nice weekend! Cheers!
Sep-17-11  MindCtrol9: two Rooks vs Rook and Knight and Whithe pawns weaks
Sep-17-11  talisman: good game ...enjoyed it guys...
Sep-17-11  rogge: One step closer to the Candidates, nice.
Sep-17-11  sevenseaman: Pono is quite a fighter, I will have to see where he slipped.
Sep-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Administrator: Thanks to everyone for coming by today. Our coverage of the World Cup resumes tomorrow at 5:am US/Eastern time. Hope to see you then.
Sep-17-11  talisman: <seven> on ♖xf5....thanks Chessgames!
Sep-17-11  Cemoblanca: <talisman: <seven> on xf5....thanks Chessgames!>

I think better was 37.R1xe2 Nxe2 38.Nd3 Rxf3 39.gxf3 Nd4 40.Ne1! to prevent Nc2! [because 40.Re3? Nc2! looks bad for white] 40...f4! 41.Rd5 Re8!, etc.

Sep-17-11  sevenseaman: Thanks <talisman>. Pono was under pressure most of the middle game but <37. Rxf5> was inane pawn grabbing.

<Cemoblanca>'s suggestion<I think better was 37.R1xe2 Nxe2 38.Nd3 Rxf3 39.gxf3 Nd4 40.Ne1! to prevent Nc2! [because 40.Re3? Nc2! looks bad for white] 40...f4! 41.Rd5 Re8!, etc.> is quite good. <37. R1Xe2 Nxe2 38. Nd3 Rxf3 39. gxf3 Nd4>

Pono fights back to near equality but the connected 'a' and 'b' pawns will win Chuky the game.

Sep-17-11  Ezzy: 13 Nxe6?! - 9 games in the database; 7 black wins! 1 white win, and 1 draw.

Now it's 8! wins by black :-)

Not a good opening choice from Ponomariov. All chess programs go in favour of black after 13 Nxe6. Mainline is 13 h4

Sep-17-11  notyetagm: <Jeffsteeven: Rxf5 is a big mistake>

Yes.

http://www.thechessmind.net/storage...

<<<<37.Rxf5?? A terrible blunder, but if Ponomariov didn't see the Nd3 idea after 37.R1xe2 he might have felt that it was just a matter of choosing one losing move rather than another.>>> It's surprising that Ponomariov didn't manage to find the right move, as he had five and a half minutes left (to reach move 40, plus 30-second increments) after Ivanchuk's 36th move, and he only spent one minute before taking on f5. <<<[37.R1xe2! was a must. After 37...Nxe2 White has the nice resource 38.Nd3! , allowing him to reach an ending that's still defensible after 38...Rxf3 39.gxf3 Nd4 40.Ne1>>> From here, one plausible continuation is 40...f4 41.Rd5 Re8 42.Rxd4 Rxe1 43.Rb4 Re3 44.Rxb5 Rxf3 45.Rb4 Rxa3 46.Rxf4 , which is drawn.; Note, however, that 37.R1xe2! Nxe2 38.Rxe2? loses, as we already saw in our look at 36...Ne2: 38...Rgxg2+ 39.Bxg2 Rxe2 is the same position as above, with the same evaluation: Black wins the a-pawn and the game.; 37.Bc6 isn't as good as 37.R1xe2, but it's a lot better than taking on f5. 37...Ne4! 38.Rg1 Bf1 39.Re8 Rxe8 (39...Rfxg2+?? 40.Rxg2 Bxg2 41.Rxg8+ Kxg8 42.Kxg2 ) 40.Bxe8 f4 41.Bc6 Ng3 keeps White in a terrible tangle, and the win must be a matter of time.]>

Sep-17-11  PawnEnding: <whiteshark>: I do not think 13. Nxe6 was a TN -- if 13. - fxe6 then 14. Rc1 Qe5 15. Rxc8 Rxc8 16. Qxd7 Kf8 17. Qxc8 Kg7 18. Qd7 and white is a piece up.
Sep-17-11  esticles: <PawnEnding> The TN was 15. Qd3. According to chessbase, the predecessor went 15.b1 c5 16.f3 xe4 17.c1 b6 18.d6 e6 19.e1 b4 20.e2 fd8 21.g3+ h8 22.a3 xa3 23.h4 b4 24.h5 e4 25.c7 ac8 26.xa7 c5 27.a6 xf2# 0-1 (27) Gormally,D (2471)-Wells,P (2485) Halifax 2003.
Sep-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Resignation Trap: Does either player remember how to move a rook?>

Is that them-those big, clunky thingies that sit skulking in the corners?

Sep-17-11  Resignation Trap: <perfidious> I think so. They look like ashtrays to me. Three of them were still in the corners when I posted my comment (the other was at f8 as a result of castling).
Sep-18-11  messachess: It looks like 37.R7e5 was white's fateful move, and that the he missed the combo to follow (time trouble?) Should have played 37.Re8 and hope to survive a pawn down. If this is right, I think it's unusual that a game on this level is so clear cut. I think it must have been time trouble.
Sep-19-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  HAPERSAUD: Oh ChukYEAH
Apr-06-12  kmlcyln: güzel oyunmuþ tebrikler
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