chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Alexander Moiseenko vs Alexander Morozevich
Governor's Cup (2011), Saratov RUS, rd 3, Oct-10
King's Indian Defense: Saemisch Variation. Normal Defense (E81)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 5 more A Moiseenko/Morozevich games
sac: 33...Rxf3+ PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: You can get computer analysis by clicking the "ENGINE" button below the game.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-10-11  brucejavier: Wow moro really is in great form! Very nice game indeed!
Oct-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: I can't complain either.
Oct-11-11  twinlark: Great to see him back.
Oct-11-11  Shams: The eight-move win starting with 33...Rxf3+! is not that hard to see in hindsight, but what a capstone to this powerful game by Moro. Final position is a gem.


click for larger view

Oct-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  paavoh: Aren't we all lectured on the importance of not exposing your Queen too soon?

Here Moro does exactly that (8 Q moves in 20), confuses his opponent, and gets away with a win.

Why, oh why, I can not replicate his success when I'm breaking the rules of chess? "Quod licet Iovi, non licet bovi" I guess...

Oct-11-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  paavoh: Now later, I came across a similar comment on the heroics of the Black Queen at:

http://www.whychess.org/node/2282

Oct-12-11  Whitehat1963: "But when you talk about destruction, don't you know that you can count me out." -- Alexander Moiseenko
Oct-12-11  JohnBoy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HxY...
Oct-12-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Gilmoy: Actually 8 of the first 18. I think Black survives because Qa5 is a good outpost to begin with, and White never really has a Q trap. Black's Q moves were sound in that she's a threat where she is, and always had escape.

Every extra Q move was balanced by an already-developed White piece moving again to attack her, which is a wash. After <18.h4 Qe7>:

- Black's Q ends up on a fine square

- White's piece development lead is 4-3, which boils down to the move: zero profit there

- White's pawns are slightly overextended: g3 is weak (which see!), f3 is not aggressive, c4 exposes b2 to the KID B, so O-O-O is bad.

- White's pieces gained no real improvement. In fact, they're arguably worse than normal. The Nb3-Nd3 pair bites on granite at c5/e5, so that was a bunch of tempi to achieve zero pressure. Nb3 is vulnerable to a4, goading the knee-jerk <21.a4>, which cedes a huge hole at b4.

Probably the deepest choice Black faced was how to exploit his half-open f gift and free up his Bc8. <21..d5!> is a <GM file-ripping pawn thrust>, which underscores f3's sub-par position. White lets g3 drop just to get his Ns into the game, and they still project no power.

Oct-12-11  checkmateyourmove: I enjoyed moro's move 27....Nf6, setting up the final attack before attacking with all his pieces. Fun game!
Oct-12-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: WHAT a game! Thank you, Natalia.
Oct-13-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Garech: Superb game from Morozevich - what an attack!

-Garech

Oct-13-11  ughaibu: How about if white plays 11.Qd2 or c1?
Oct-14-11  hedgeh0g: Maybe trade and play Nc6. Then Black has a basic plan of pressuring the queenside with ...Be6, ...Ne5 and ...Rc8.
Oct-14-11  Ulhumbrus: An alternative to 12 Qe2 is 12 Nd5 at once, clearing the square c3 for the B on d4

An alternative to 18 h4 is 18 f4 keeping Black's Knights out of the square e5 and keeping an advantage in space

Oct-17-11  DAVI DE RAFE: one alexander played like an idiot.
Oct-17-11  sevenseaman: One needs to acknowledge the brilliance of the other Alexander.
Oct-18-11  YoGoSuN: Can someone please explain what Black does after 7. dxc5?
Oct-18-11  Shams: <YoGoSuN> Your question is a famous one. Why should White not win a clean pawn, get the queens off, play Nd5 and then win the e7 pawn? There's no easy answer; there are whole chapters written on this line but what it amounts to is that at master level White is almost groveling for a draw, hard as it is to believe. If I see a good online tutorial I'll flag it.
Oct-18-11  JohnBoy: Black gets lots of play from open lines after the pawn sac. Here's a fun example played by a couple of kids: Bacrot vs McShane, 1992
Nov-06-11  avidfan: At the final position Black threatens 41...Qh4 mate and there is no adequate reply. If 41. Nf2 Bxf2 renews the mate threat while winning the knight.

On 41.Qh2 Rh3 dis ch and mate (Boden) while immobilising the White queen with a pin on the h-file.


click for larger view

NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any gratuitous name-calling of any members—including Admin and Owners—or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
KID Saemisch
from reurbz's Favorite Games by reurbz
Morozevich's many q moves
from rilkefan's favorite KIDs by rilkefan
Governor's Cup, Saratov RUS 2011 Rd.3
from Selected Tournaments and Favorite Games (2011) b by partien
KID Saemisch
from Nikki Some of reurbz's Favorite Games by fredthebear
Book of Samurai's favorite games 5
by Book of Samurai


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC