chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Zahar Efimenko vs Etienne Bacrot
Karpov Poikovsky (2011), Poikovsky RUS, rd 9, Oct-13
Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. l'Hermet Variation Berlin Wall Defense (C67)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

explore this opening
find similar games 4 more Efimenko/Bacrot games
sac: 21...Nxf3 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: To access more information about the players (more games, favorite openings, statistics, sometimes a biography and photograph), click their highlighted names at the top of this page.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE OF THIS GAME IS AVAILABLE.  [CLICK HERE]

Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-17-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: 46.Bxb6 was clearly a mistake, though it is not easy to neutralize the threatening advance of black a-Pawn.
Oct-17-11  tonsillolith: Is there really no way to defend after 51...Qf1? It seems like White could make a solid setup leaving that bishop on d6 and then shuffling around with king and knight.
Oct-17-11  bronkenstein: <Is there really no way to defend after 51...Qf1? It seems like White could make a solid setup leaving that bishop on d6 and then shuffling around with king and knight.>

Something similar to the game would happen, white king simply marches in and there is no visible fortress plan. BTW Due to queen+king attacking , bishop would have to retreat back from d6 anyway .

Jun-23-14  DcGentle: During the first moves of Chessgames Challenge: The World vs Naiditsch, 2014 I posted the following annotations on the game pages:

____________________

[Event "12th Karpov International"]
[Site "Poikovsky RUS"]
[Date "2011.10.13"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Zahar Efimenko"]
[Black "Etienne Bacrot"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C67"]
[WhiteElo "2703"]
[BlackElo "2705"]
[Annotator "Gentle,DC"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 {<This is most commonly played. But there is an alternative, 9. Rd1 in order to keep the king on the kingside. We'll see.>} Ke8 10. h3 {<Prophylaxis, in order to prevent a pin by a bishop on g4, should there be a white knight on d1. Also the king has a new route to the center and back rank issues are avoided.>} h5 {<This is a clear indication that Black wants to develop his rook via h6. But White didn't see the broad hint.>} 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 {<This is a mistake, because the strategic square h6 is now controlled by Black allowing him to develop his rook.>} Rh6 {<This rook will become rather annoying for Black here.>} 14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 {<The white king and the black rook are on the same file now. This is rather important, even if king g1 is not directly attacked.>} 16. h4 (16. Bf4 {<would have allowed>} Nh4 {<so White prefers to cover his bishop.>}) 16... f6 {<But Black forces this bishop to move anyways!>} 17. exf6 gxf6 18. Bf4 Nxh4 {<and White lost a pawn.>} 19. f3 {<White wants to evacuate his king via f2.>} Rg7 20. Ne4 Kf7 21. Kf2 Nxf3 {<The next surprise! Because Black is a pawn up already, this exchange sac is even more effective after Black's next move.>} 22. Kxf3 Bg4+ {<skewering White's rook d1.>} 23. Kf2 Bxd1 24. Rxd1 Kg6 {<Now it's clear why Black moved his rook to g7 at move 19. 24... Kg6 discovers a rook protection of pawn c7!>} 25. Nc5 {<The knight cannot do much harm here, because 26. Nxb7 is countered by 26... Rb8.>} Re7 26. Kf3 {<Black has gained the pawn majority on the kingside, and White cannot do so much with his pieces, although he has one more.>} Rae8 27. Bd2 Kf7 28. Nd3 b6 29. Re1 Rxe1 30. Bxe1 c5 31. Bc3 Rh8 32. Be1 Re8 33. b3 c6 34. Bf2 Rd8 35. Be3 Rh8 36. Bf2 Rd8 37. a4 Rd7 {<Black's rook is so strong, because Black has succeeded in restricting White's pieces pretty much.>} 38. Be3 Rd8 39. Nf4 {<This is the losing move, because Black's rook can invade.>} Rd1 40. Nxh5 c4 {<dissolving White's queenside pawn structure.>} 41. bxc4 Ra1 42. Ke4 Rxa4 43. Kd3 Ra3+ 44. c3 Ra2 45. Nf4 a5 {<White is helpless, because Black's a-pawn can hardly be stopped.>} 46. Bxb6 a4 47. Bc5 a3 48. Bb4 Rd2+ 49. Kxd2 a2 50. Bd6 a1=Q 51. c5 Qf1 52. Ne2 Ke6 53. c4 Kf5 54. Ke3 Kg4 55. Bf4 Qf3+ 56. Kd2 Qf2 57. Be3 Qg2 {<White resigned, because he will lose more material. It's crucial, that White must prevent Black from invading his camp.>} 0-1

____________________

You can copy & paste the above pgn-formatted text into a PGN viewer like http://chesstempo.com/pgn-viewer-be...

Ģ

Jun-23-14  john barleycorn: <DcGentle: During the first moves of Chessgames Challenge: The World vs Naiditsch, 2014 I posted the following annotations on the game pages:

____________________

[Event "12th Karpov International"]
[Site "Poikovsky RUS"]
[Date "2011.10.13"]
[Round "9"]
[White "Zahar Efimenko"]
[Black "Etienne Bacrot"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "C67"]
[WhiteElo "2703"]
[BlackElo "2705"]
[Annotator "Gentle,DC"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 Nf6 4. O-O Nxe4 5. d4 Nd6 6. Bxc6 dxc6 7. dxe5 Nf5 8. Qxd8+ Kxd8 9. Nc3 <This is most commonly played. ♗ut there is an alternative, 9. ♖d1 in order to keep the king on the kingside. We'll see.> Ke8 10. h3 <♙rophylaxis, in order to prevent a pin by a bishop on g4, should there be a white knight on d1. Also the king has a new route to the center and back rank issues are avoided.> h5 <This is a clear indication that ♗lack wants to develop his rook via h6. ♗ut White didn't see the broad hint.> 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 <This is a mistake, because the strategic square h6 is now controlled by ♗lack allowing him to develop his rook.> Rh6 <This rook will become rather annoying for ♗lack here.> 14. g3 Bxg5 15. Bxg5 Rg6 <The white king and the black rook are on the same file now. This is rather important, even if king g1 is not directly attacked.>>

What I do not understand is why we still find this variant played at top level despite the above annotations, for example:

<h5 <This is a clear indication that ♗lack wants to develop his rook via h6. ♗ut White didn't see the broad hint.> 11. Bf4 Be7 12. Rad1 Be6 13. Ng5 <This is a mistake, because the strategic square h6 is now controlled by ♗lack allowing him to develop his rook.>>

Examples played after the cited game include:

Karjakin vs Naiditsch, 2012
Naiditsch vs W So, 2014
Grischuk vs Anand, 2011

Apr-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Mateo: 50.Bd6? seems to be the losing move. He had to play 50.Bxa3. I am not sure Black could win after 50...Rxa3.
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any gratuitous name-calling of any members—including Admin and Owners—or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

Featured in the Following Game Collection[what is this?]
Sink
by Sink


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC