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Gyorgy Brhlik vs Ferenc Berebora
Bekescsaba FIUME (1995), rd 1
Zukertort Opening: Sicilian Invitation (A04)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: Just crush White with 24...Rxg3! 25.hxg3 (25.Qxg5 Rxg5 leaves Black with two extra pawns and the initiative) Ne3! 26.Bxb7 Qxg3+ 27.Kh1 Re5 28.Rc8+ Kg7 0-1.
Oct-19-12  King Sacrificer: <Abdel Irada: Then there's the school White belonged to in this game, which we might call the Misunderstood Hypermodern, in which players let their opponents establish a spatial advantage in the center, while looking the other way and whistling "Jimmy Cracked Corn.">

Was it 15. Rad1 making White suffer this much? I checked for opportunities for White to push his e-pawn and 15. e3 seemed right to me.

Oct-19-12  morfishine: I dismissed <24...Rxg3> due to 25.Qxg5 Rxg5 <26.e4>

Black is clearly winning, but a decisive position (forcing mate or winning a piece or exchange) has not been reached yet; and with the Queens off, probably won't be for some time

Oct-19-12  Abdel Irada: <morfishine>: It seemed to me that, if nothing else, Black comes out two pawns to the good on that sequence. If that's the best "refutation" White can find, then the sacrifice can't help but be good. :-D
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Phony Benoni> is right that 26.Kf2 is a better try. (I don't like his alternative 26.Kh2, when 26...Bxg2 threatens 27...Qh5+ 28.Kg1 Qh1+ 27.Kf2 Qh2.) After 26.Kf2 Bxg2 intending ...Re6-f6+ looks grim for White, for example 27.Rg1 Qf5+ 28.Ke1 Qh3 29.Kf2 Qh2. But at least White could console himself - briefly - with the thought that he's up the exchange.
Oct-19-12  Abdel Irada: I'm curious: Did anyone else have difficulty posting for a while? I couldn't put up my solution for nearly a half-hour after composing it because of lag.
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <<morfishine: I dismissed <24...Rxg3> due to 25.Qxg5 Rxg5 <26.e4>>

Abdel Irada: <morfishine>: It seemed to me that, if nothing else, Black comes out two pawns to the good on that sequence. If that's the best "refutation" White can find, then the sacrifice can't help but be good. :-D >

It's even worse than that. After 26.e4 dxe3 Black is three pawns up and threatens both 26...Nf4, winning the bishop, and 26...Nxb4, winning a fourth pawn and attacking the rook. If 27.Kh1, Black can play 27...Rxg2 anyway (28.Kxg2 Nxb4+; 28.Rxg2 Nf4), or 27...Nxb4. If 27.Kf1, Nxb4.

I don't like 26.e4, but given Black's threats of 26...Nf4, 26...Rxg2+ 27.Kxg2 Nxb4+, and simply 26...Nxb4, I have nothing better to recommend. The more one looks at the position, the more one realizes that White is dead lost.

Oct-19-12  Abdel Irada: Ah. I see Brhlik grabbed the bishop and perished as in my variation (2.4). Not much of a test, but then, Black had so many advantages almost anything would win.

<King Sacrificer>: That's a good question. It appears to me that White was already somewhat worse even before the fifteenth move. He'd invested a lot of time getting his knight to a4 to attack a pawn that was easily defended with ...b6, and then he compounded his mistake by declining to advance a center pawn.

I think your 15. e3 is probably best for him under the circumstances, although it weakens the light squares, particularly d3 and f3. But beggars can't be choosers, and White was reduced to positional penury.

Of course, the maneuver that really put the rod between White's spokes was 19. Ng5?, with which he hoped to post the knight on e4. This was wrong for two reasons: Even had Black allowed it, the knight couldn't stay on e4 because of an eventual ...f5; and of course it allowed the tactic 19. ...Nfe3!, after which White's position was already hopeless.

All of this play (particularly with the knight maneuver to an untenable "outpost") reminded me powerfully of a B-player I knew in Santa Cruz, who was fond of the English, and shared White's predilection for the Misunderstood Hypermodern.

Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  FSR: <Abdel Irada> Brhlik is apparently an avid exponent of the Misunderstood Hypermodern, as you put it. His only other game in the database is G Brhlik vs Dao Thien Hai, 1995, where he also was rolled by a kingside attack, although he held out a little longer.
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: Black is one pawn ahead.

The knight would be better placed on e3. This suggests 24... Rxg3:

A) 25.hxg3 Ne3

A.1) 26.Bxb7 Qxg3+ 27.Kh1 Re5 28.Bf3 Rh5+ 29.Bxh5 Qg2#.

A.2) 26.Nd1 Qxg3 27.Nxe3 dxe3 - + with the double threat 28... Qxg2# and 28... exd2, although the former is unavoidable.

A.3) 26.Kf2 Bxg2

A.3.a) 27.Nd1(c4) Qf5+ 28.Kg1 Qh3 with a winning attack (29.Kf2 Ng4+ 30.Kg1 Qh1#; 29.Nxe3 dxe3 - +).

A.3.b) 27.Qxe3 Rxe3 28.Kxg2 Rxg3+ and mate next.

A.4) 26.Kh2 Bxg2 looks similar to A.3 (27.Nc4 Qh5+ 28.Kg1 Qh3, etc.).

A.5) 26.Qxe3 dxe3 27.Bxb7 Qxg3+ 28.Bg2 (28.Kf1 Qf2#) 28... Qxe1+ - + [Q+3P vs B+N].

B) 25.Qxg5 Rxg5 - + [2P] and multiple threats (26... Ne3, 26... Rxg2+, 26... Nxb4, etc.).

C) 25.e4 dxe3 looks disasterous for White.

Oct-19-12  gars: I did it all wrong, of course, but I have a very good excuse for that: all the time I wondered about how to pronounce BRHLIK. I have been told that in Hungarian one says what one reads, but that does not seem to help me much.
Oct-19-12  Razgriz: Fascinating. Got the initial 2 moves but screwed up the rest of the continuation.
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I liked Nf4,also...

After the text,black mates on the h-file.

Oct-19-12  Marmot PFL: 24...Rxg3 25 hg Qxg3 26 e4 (what else?) de4 27 Qd1 Nf4 28 Re1-e2 Nh3+ 29 Kh1 Nf2+ and wins easily. Unless I missed a resource for white, this is pretty simple for a Friday.
Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  scormus: <<FSR: <Abdel Irada> Brhlik is apparently an avid exponent of the Misunderstood Hypermodern, as you put it.>

I shouldn't laugh, last time I played KIA I lost.

I always feel the same way with games from Hypermodern openings as I do when watching one of those films by David Lynch, something like "No Highway."

Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  chrisowen: Land ahoy in e3xg3 look in accordence got rook entrance demolish a

king structure g2 only saviour gets carried away on exodus in e3

knight alive to the threats of potential mating net once g3 has gone

stxb7 qxg3+ king has only one viable square h1 and rook drops in e5

to provide cover g3 key in this overwhelming position white knight

is too slow coming back in d1 to threaten rooke3 drastic action is

called for as put in black pieces all yearning for inclusion start.

Oct-19-12  BOSTER: Black rook on e3 blocked white's pawn e2 and with it all queen's side. It looks like all white pieces on the second rank try to run the blockade to help his bishop on g2 , the main defender in white castle, which now is cut from all pieces. If you remember the game where young Morphy sacr. his queen playing vs Paulsen, you have immediatly check move 24...Rxg3 25.hxg3 Ne3.

But if you don't like this idea,let's try 24...Nf4 where white forces to play 25.Bxb7.

Lasker said that the idea of the combo is an art,but calculations is a handicraft , but this requires a good skill.

Oct-19-12  morfishine: <Abdel Irada> & <fSR> Concur completely; My only point is Black would've lasted longer with <25.Qxg5>, certainly past move 28, which, as the game went, is where it ends since there's no way to prevent 28...Rh5 mate
Oct-19-12  Coigach: I'm another one who went for 24...Nf4. It wins too, although in my analysis I missed W's best defence. I spent quite a bit of time calculating wins e.g.

25.gf Qxg2#

25.Nc4 Nxg2 26.Nxe3 de 27.Qd1 Nxe1

25.Bxb7 Rxg3+ 26.hg (26.Bg2 Rxg2+ mating) Qxg3+ but my analysis went astray after this and I also missed the 26.Kh1 line completely, which is objectively White's best try although still winning for Black with best play.

25.Be4 or Bh1 Rxg3+ as in 25.Bxb7 but easier with an extra bishop

25.Bf3 (my main line; White blocks Rxg3) Bxf3 26.ef Rxe1 27.Qxe1 (27.Kf2 Nh3+ 28.Kg2 Rg1+ 29. Kxh3 Qh5#) Rxe1+ 28.Kf2 Nxd3+ 29.Nxd3 Qxe3+ 30.Kg2 Rg1+ 31.Kh3 Qh6+ 32.Kg4 f5#.

This seemed OK to me and I never even looked seriously at other candidates, dismissing the stronger 24...Rxg3 played in the game because it didn't look immediately decisive after 25.Qxg5.

I think I am making progress with the puzzles later in the week, but still have a tendency to get drawn into calculating one particular move, neglecting other candidates which turn out to be better.

I know the advice about taking time identifying and evaluating candidates before starting serious analysis, but find it hard not to get carried away with a move like 24...Nf4 which feels right as soon as I see it. And then, being rather slow and not really accurate enough analysing such a move, I'm not in good shape to look seriously at anything else.

I guess I just need to keep working at these puzzles for pattern recognition, speed and accuracy of analysis to improve.

Oct-19-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jambow: About a Wednesday imho, reminds of the last Carlsen Anand game where the losers own pawns prevent an adequate defence by impeding lateral movement of their own pieces.
Oct-19-12  James D Flynn: Black is a pawn up and his pieces have much more space. The White pieces are boxed in on the Q-side impeded by his own pawns on e2 and d3. The Black pieces have firm control of the hole on e3. The e2 pawn is attacked twice and 3 times defended but Black can easily apply more pressure to the attack by Qe7, Qe5 or Qg4 unpinning the R on e3. The Black N on d5 is also pinned but there is no hurry to unpin it because it may be able to move with tactical shots such as 24…. Nf4 25.Bxg7 Rxg3+ 26.hxg3 Qxg3+ 27.Kh1 Qh4+ 28.Kg8 Re3 29.Rf1(else Nh3+ and Qf2#) Rg3+ 30.Kf2 Rg4+ 31.Kf3 Qg3+ 32.Ke4 Ne6+ 33.Kd5 b5(else the K escapes via c4) and Black has sacrificed a B and R for 2 pawns to expose Whites K but it is unclear how the reduced material will force the mate. Given the dominant position of Blacks pieces He likely does not need to sacrifice anything to win. He can force instance Ply h5 threatening h4 to open the Ks position. He can also play Qe7 protecting the B on b7 adding another piece to the attack on e2 and threatening to take the pawn on b4. Candidates Qe7, h5, Rxg3 and Nf4. 24…..Qe7 25.Rc4 Nc3(not Rxe2 26.Rxe2 Qxe2 27.Qxe2 Rxe2 28.Rxd4 Ne3 29.Bxb7 Re1+ 30.Kf2 wins) 26.Bxb7 Qxb7 27.Rxd4 Nxe2+ 28.Rxe2 (if Kf1 Qg2#) Rxe2 29.Qxe2 Rxe2 and Qg2# next or after a spite check. 24. ….h5 25.Nd1 h4 26,Nxe3 dxe3 27.Qc1 hxg3 28.h3 Nf4 29.Bxb7 g2 30.Kh2(else Qg3 and Nh3#) Kg7 24…….Rxg3 25.Qxg5 Rxg5 26. Kh1 (else Ne3 wins the B) Rxg2 27.Kxg2 Ne3+ 28.KKf2 Nxc2 29.Rc1 Nxb4 and Black has won a B and 2 pawns and has a clearly won endgame,
Oct-19-12  Patriot: I failed on this one because I just don't see it. 24...Nf4 looks like a good candidate but I'm just not sure and I've already taken too long.
Oct-19-12  geniokov: ...Nf4 is my candidate move!
Oct-19-12  TheBish: G Brhlik vs F Berebora, 1995

Black to play (24...?) "Difficult", Black is up a pawn.

Black crashes through with 24...Rxg3! 25. hxg3

Or 25. Qxg5 Rxg5 26. Kf2 (or 26. e4 dxe3) Rxg2 27. Kxg2 Ne3+.

25...Ne3! 26. Bxb7 (26. Bf3 is similar) Qxg3+ 27. Kh1 Re5 28. Bf3 Rh5+ 29. Bxh5 Qg2#; also 26. Kf2 Bxg2 gives Black a strong attack.

Oct-31-12  Infohunter: <gars: I did it all wrong, of course, but I have a very good excuse for that: all the time I wondered about how to pronounce BRHLIK. I have been told that in Hungarian one says what one reads, but that does not seem to help me much.>

Though the player may be Hungarian by birth, his surname is not of Hungarian origin; rather, it is Czech. "Brhlík" is not only a name, but also a Czech word meaning "nuthatch". Both "l" and "r" can be used as vowels in Czech, something that takes a bit of getting used to for the Anglophone learner of that language.

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