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Alexander Morozevich vs Magnus Carlsen
Tal Memorial (2012), Moscow RUS, rd 2, Jun-09
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Classical. Noa Variation (E34)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 12 OF 13 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jun-09-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  chessgames.com: Thanks to everybody for participating in today's live broadcast. Come back tomorrow at 7am USA/Eastern for round 3.

We may switch to another board to finish the day's broadcasts. McShane-Radjabov looks lively.

Jun-09-12  karnak64: Yes, very cool to follow. Tense game to the end. Thanks, cg.com, for carrying it. Thanks to all who kibbitzed and guided us through the potential lines of play.
Jun-09-12  haydn20: Well, time to call my girlfriend, Maria Sharapova, and congratulate her on her victory in the French Open. She should be in a great mood tonight ;)
Jun-09-12  Cemoblanca: This draw was "Deader than the Dead"! :D Have a nice weekend & thanks for broadcasting the game! Regards!
Jun-09-12  MindCtrol9: <INTERESTING CHESS FACTS>I TOOK THIS FROM CHESS.COM WHERE I AM A MEMBER. 1. Did you know the number of possible ways of playing the first four moves for both sides in a game of chess is 318,979,564,000? 2. The longest game of chess that is theorically possible is 5,949 moves. 3. The first chessboard with alternating light and dark squares (as it appears today) was made in Europein 1090. 4.According to the America's Foundation for Chess,there are 169,518,829,100,544,000,000,000,000,000 (aproximately 1.70x1029) ways to play the first 10 moves of a game of chess.And they sought a computer would solve chess. 5. The longest chess game ever was I.Nikolic,Belgrade 1989,which ended in 269 moves.The game was a draw. 7.There are 400 different possible positions after one move each.There are 72,064 different possible positions after the two moves each.There are over 9 million different positions after three moves each.The number of distinct 40 move games in chess is far greater than the number of electrons in the observable universe.

AND THERE IS ANOTHER PAGE ABOUT THIS.

Jun-09-12  MindCtrol9: It says like that 1090.
Jun-09-12  Cemoblanca: <MindCtrol9> Frightening digits here Dude, if you compare it with the board & the figures! Really frightening! That's why I respect chess so much! I was quite familiar with 4. & 7. Here's a nice video on YouTube with Garry Kasparov [ about chess (what else?) & the universe ;0) ]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hf3...

More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanno...

Regards!

Jun-09-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  lost in space: very impressive how Dude Carlsen was able to sneak out
Jun-09-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Moro's seventh rank rooks looked like a big advantage, but not quite enough to win with.
Jun-09-12  Octal: So what are the alternatives on move 31? Kc5-b6 was mentioned, but then what after the king gets there? Black can't do anything, but if White has no threats then the positions remains static.
Jun-09-12  Pedro Fernandez: <haydn20: 41. Rc5 looks like an "only move.">You're right! 41.d5 was not enough (black win a crucial tempo)as it is easily seen in a simple analysis (it is not necessary chess machines).
Jun-09-12  MindCtrol9: <Cemoblanca> I washed that video up to the end.Kasparov talk about Fischer,too.I liked it where he explains about how computers work and how they can be improved.We are humans and in a match vs a computer(a strong computer) we can get tired,they don't.There is a big difference to play a person face to face where we can see the expression on his face,but this is not 100% acurate due to the fact a player can use pasychology to confuse the other.Chess is the best game ever invented,and that why I love it so much.THANKS FOR THE VIEDEO TO WASH.
Jun-09-12  solskytz: Amazing how you get two rooks into the seventh, look like you're crushing the opposition, and then just don't.

I didn't believe any player could save this against Morozevich

Jun-09-12  Eyal: <Alexander Morozevich tried a rare sideline in the Nimzo-Indian Classical with 11.Rc1 which offers the a-pawn for a lot of compensation against Magnus Carlsen. This move has been seen before but not many times and Carlsen immediately went wrong. Either he can capture on a2 straight away or probably he doesn't do it at all. Both players agreed his 11...Nd7? was a bad idea and it was one mentioned as such in the very popular club player's manual "The Kaufman Repertoire for Black and White" (http://www.ukgamesshop.com/Merchant...). The point is 12.Nge2 Qxa2 13.Kd1! is close to winning for white. (Draw J Priborsky vs S J Gordon, 2008 but Priborsky was rated well below Stephen Gordon).> (http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessne...)

[<12.Nge2 Qxa2 13.Kd1!> removing the knight from the pin attacks the queen as well as e4 & d5; e.g., <13...Nxc3+ 14.Nxc3 Bxc3 15.Qxc3 O-O 16.h4 g4 17.b3!> threatening to capture the black queen with Ra1]

Jun-09-12  Cemoblanca: <MindCtrol9> No problem man! I'm glad you liked the stuff! :0) By the way: I'm still thinking, what was the idea behind the (great) move 31.Re8? ;0) Magnus has not saved this 1! Moro was the 1, who has not played vigorously! Unfortunately!
Jun-09-12  NGambit: Back and forth! But it was Moro who missed his chance..
Jun-09-12  Octal: Okay, people are talking about how Moro missed his chance, but where is the improvement?

(I'm not trying to defend Carlsen here. I just want to know where the improvement is, regardless of who is playing Black.)

Jun-09-12  Jim Bartle: According to the running commentary at chessdom (by someone whose name I don't recognize), 31. Re8 was a big mistake. He said white's rook on e7 was much more valuable than the black rook on f8.

He said 31. Kc5 and 32. Kc6 should win, but didn't give variations.

Jun-10-12  Cemoblanca: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36-O...

No, the GM who analyzed the game is not a "Box Champion" [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_...!! ;0) Great job by the way! Thanks for the video De La Hoya.. ähh.. De La Riva! ;0)

Jun-10-12  Eyal: <According to the running commentary at chessdom (by someone whose name I don't recognize), 31. Re8 was a big mistake. He said white's rook on e7 was much more valuable than the black rook on f8.

He said 31. Kc5 and 32. Kc6 should win, but didn't give variations.>

31.Kc5 & Kb6, to be exact... that was Gajewski (a 2600 Polish GM). Another option is <31.a5> - Shipov gives several winning ideas following this move in his analysis of the game (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d3SN... - starting from about 8:30). The basic idea in both cases is to keep increasing the pressure rather than exchange pieces, since Black is on the verge of zugzwang.

Jun-10-12  Jim Bartle: Right, my mistake: 31. Kc5 and 32. Kb6.
Jun-10-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Shams: <The basic idea in both cases is to keep increasing the pressure rather than exchange pieces, since Black is on the verge of zugzwang.>

As White, Carlsen would have found the right plan in seconds I bet. He could not be more at home in a position like this.

Jun-10-12  maxi: I was zapping over the moves of this game at about two moves per second and then I saw 31.Re8, and I went "What the ...!" It blows my mind that a GM would make such a mistake.
Jun-10-12  solskytz: Armed with a computer everyone is a chess genius.

Without a computer, every reasonably capable amateur can sometimes see a move that the GM missed.

Not to mention that after the game is over things are much easier to see than OTB.

For each such move where you 'understood' better than the GMs, some 500 moves will be found in your own games where the GM will improve upon what you played.

Some humility and respect are still in order.

These people dedicate a lifetime to hone a skill, and manage to do what most other people with similar dedication fail at.

Jun-10-12  visayanbraindoctor: <maxi: I was zapping over the moves of this game at about two moves per second and then I saw 31.Re8>

Yes. Even without a computer, it is an obvious positional blunder. Why exchange a rook on the 7th rank for an inactive one?

The main reason, aside from time pressure, is related to the idea below:

<Shams: <The basic idea in both cases is to keep increasing the pressure rather than exchange pieces, since Black is on the verge of zugzwang.>

As White, Carlsen would have found the right plan in seconds I bet. He could not be more at home in a position like this.>

Morozevich has an active forcing style. He does not like lengthy squeeze-outs were he tries to prophylactically contain a cramped opponent's counter-play. So he went for a forcing line.

On the other hand, I believe Carlsen's greatest strength lies in such positions. Squeeze-outs and grind-outs. If the positions were reversed, he probably would have easily won.

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