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David Klein vs Lisa Schut
Tata Steel Group C (2013), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 2, Jan-13
Modern Defense: Beefeater Variation (A40)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
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May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I mean mate in 2 either by Nh6 mate or Rxg6+ and then mate.
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: An idea I had was Ng4 and then if possible Qh6 and the Q cant be taken (depending what Black has done) but it is hard to engineer, ingenious as I thought it was!

So 27. Ng4 Rac8 28. Qh6 looked as though it wins but of course Black just plays 27. ... Nxg4.

Klein played accurately to win a good game.

May-30-14  M.Hassan: "Difficult"
White to play 27.?
White is a pawn down and has a Bishop for a Knight.

27.Rf5
with the idea of <28.Rxg5+ Nxg5 29.Qxg5+ Qg7 30.Qxg7#>

A) if 27........h6
28.Rxg5+ hxg5
29.Qg6#

B) if 27.......Ng6
28.Rxg5 Rae8
29.Rxg6+ hxg6
30.Qxg6#

C)Also if 27....Ng6
28.Rxg5 Nh6 to provide an escape route for the King via f7 29.Rxg6+ Kf7
30.Rg7#

May-30-14  BOSTER: To build the <Modern Defense > without the Bishop on g7 is the same like build a bridge without river. Useless attempt.
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Black's soft underbelly is g5- a perfect focus for a white attack.
May-30-14  sombreronegro: 27 . Rf5 looks tough to parry. 27... Ng6 maybe but then 28. Ng4.
May-30-14  sombreronegro: I envisioned a more immediate R X g5 but..
May-30-14  sombreronegro: So you have the fianchetto and then a quick 4....B x d5 and by 7... e6 the black squares on the king side are weak. B 9 ... Nf6, d6, e5, g5, h6, and g7 are uncontested with a malevolent black square bishop on c1.... Then when the queen leaves f6 the bishop becomes a nightmare on f6.

Way too much pressure to try and blockade with a pair of knights.

May-30-14  emma955: <al wazir > my mistake, i was thinking in Ng4
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <BOSTER: To build the <Modern Defense> without the Bishop on g7 is the same like build a bridge without river. Useless attempt.>

Actually this line does have some pedigree. It has been played 122 times in the CG database, with white winning 27% and black 52.5%. That is a very healthy score for black.

The line is variously known as the beefeater or Dzindi-Indian. This is what chesspublishing.com has to say about it:

<"This line is usually named after the grandmaster and two-time US Champion Roman Dzindzichashvili, who pioneered the defence in the 1980s. It looks like a strange cocktail of the Benoni, Dutch and Nimzo-Indian!

Black's decision to capture on c3 unbalances the position in a way he couldn't hope to do otherwise, and for this reason the Dzindzi-Indian is an effective line to play as Black if you are desperate to win. One practical advantage from Black's point of view is that quiet responses by White tend to be at best unchallenging and sometime much worse than that, so the Dzindzi-Indian can be a successful choice against timid players.

The follow-up of ...f5 is designed to avoid giving White a free hand in the centre.

Black will usually try to keep the position as closed as possible, and then exploit White's obvious structural weaknesses on the queenside. An example of a successful Black strategy is seen in Handler-Kozul, Graz 2011, where White's 6 Nf3 and subsequent play leaves Black with little to fear.">

It's an unusual line. As with most modern chess openings, black accepts one set of weaknesses (eg the missing Bg7 and weak dark squares) in return for positional compensation - the weak white c pawns and activity.

A good video about it here:

http://www.onlinechesslessons.net/2...

Useless attempt? Or an interesting opening played by GMs?

May-30-14  sombreronegro: <
actually this line does have some pedigree. It has been played 122 times in the CG database, with white winning 27% and black 52.5%. That is a very healthy score for black.

The line is variously known as the beefeater or Dzindi-Indian. This is what chesspublishing.com has to say about it:>

Indeed :

Game Collection: 98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

It certainly can be done, but again, notice few pick up and move that e pawn controlling d6 and f6.

For example:

J Royset vs Nakamura, 2010

Seneca L Nowland vs M Pinto, 2001

etc

One must choose their compromises, but not the same sore spot. Removing the bishop, pushing the e pawn and then castling into it picked the scab too much.

But yes there is an idea of light square dominance with the removal of the c3 night, particularly e4.

May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White has a bishop for a knight and a pawn.

If the white knight were on g4 then White would win with 27.Qh6, threatening 28.Qg7# (27... Nxh6 28.Nxh6#; 27... Nd8(h8) 28.Qxg5 Kf7 (28... Ng6 29.Nh6#) 29.Bd8+ wins the queen). On the other hand, 27.Rf5, with the idea 28.Rxg5+ Nxg5 29.Qxg5+, seems to fail due to 29... Ng6. These details suggest 27.Ng4, threatening 28.Qh7 and 28.Rf5:

A) 27... Nxg4 28.Qxg4

A.1) 28... b5 29.Rf5

A.1.a) 29... a5 30.Rxg5+ Nxg5 31.Qxg5+ Kf7 32.Bd8+ or 32.Qg7+, wins.

A.1.b) 29... Ra7 30.Rxg5+ Nxg5 31.Qxg5+ Kf7 32.Bd8+ wins.

A.1.c) 29... h6 30.Qh5

A.1.c.i) 30... Ne5 31.Rxe5 (or 31.Qxh6 + -, or 31.Rxg5+ Kh7 (31... hxg5 32.Qh8+ Kf7 33.Qg7+ Ke8 34.Qxc7, etc.) 32.Bxe5 with a winning attack) 31... Rxf6 (31... dxe5 32.Qg6+ Qg7 33.Qxg7#) 32.Rxg5+ hxg5 33.Rxf6 with a winning attack.

A.1.c.ii) 30... Nh8 31.Qxh6 Rxf6 (else 32.Rxg5+ winning) 32.Rxf6 + -, with the double threat 33.Rf8+ and 33.Qxg5+.

A.1.c.iii) 30... Kh7 31.Bxg5 Nxg5 (31... Kg8 32.Qg6+ Kh8 33.Bf6#; 31... Kg7 32.Rxf7+ Rxf7 33.Bxh6+ Kg8 34.Qg6+ Rg7 35.Bxg7 Qxg7 36.Qe6+ Kh8 37.Rf6 Kh7 38.Rf7, etc.) 32.Rxf8 + - [R vs N].

A.2) 28... h6 29.Qh5

A.2.a) 29... Ne5 30.Qxh6 Qh7 31.Qxg5+ Qg6 (31... Ng6 32.e5 dxe5 33.d6 looks winning) 32.Rf5, threatening 33.Rxe5, seems to lead to a won ending after 32... Qxg5+ 33.Rxg5+ Kh7 (33... Kf7 34.Bxe5+) 34.Rg7+ Kh6 35.Bxe5 Rxf1+ 36.Kxf1 dxe5 37.Rxb7 + - [2P].

A.2.b) 29... Nh8 30.Qxh6 as in A.2.a.

A.2.c) 29... Kh7 30.Bxg5 as in A.1.c.iii.

A.3) 28... Ne5 29.Bxe5 (29.Qxg5+ Ng6, unclear) 29... dxe5 (29... Rxf2 30.Qxg5+ Kf7(8) 30.Rxf2+ wins a piece) 30.Qxg5+ Qg7 31.Rxf8+ Rxf8 32.Rxf8+ Kxf8 33.Qd8+ Kf7 34.Qc7+ Kf6 35.Qxc5 and 35... Qg3(4,5) loses to 36.Qf8+ and 37.Qg8+.

A.4) 28... Nh8 29.Bxh8 Rxf2 30.Rxf2 Kxh8 31.Rf7 wins.

B) 27... h6 28.Nxh6+ Nxh6 29.Qxh6 Qh7 30.Qxg5+ transposes to A.2.a.

C) 27... Qd7 29.Qh6 and mate soon.

-----

Perhaps 27.Rf5 with the idea 28.Ng4, instead of 28.Rxg5+ is easier or quicker, I don't know.

May-30-14  abuzic: 27.Rf5 Ng6
28.Ng4 Qd7
29.R1f3 Rfc8
30.Be7 Qxe7
31.Rxf7


click for larger view

Black avoids immaediate mate with Qxh7# by losing the Q 31...Qxf7 and this mate could follow:
32.Nh6+ Kh8
33.Rxf7 Nf4
34.Qg4 Rf8
35.Qf5 Rxf7
36.Qxf7 Nh5
37.g4 Ng7
38.Qg8+ Rxg8
39.Nf7#


click for larger view

May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: 31.Rf7 in my line A.4 blunders the rook. I don't know why I thought that the white queen was on h5. However, 31.Qe6, threatening 32.Rf7, seems to win: 31... Qg7 32.Qxd6 with the idea of e5 and Qxc5 followed by d6, etc.
May-30-14  BOSTER: <Once> <The line is known as the beefeater or Dzindi-Indian>.

Thanks for the video.
To be honest I have never heard the Dzindi-Indian name, even I have met Dzindi couple times.

And here an other opinion.

"The future belongs to he who has the bishops". Tarrasch".

"If one looks at the bishop from the viewpoint of the person , responsible for the outcome of the battle, bishops are far superior to the fastidious, unwieldy knights". Bronstein.

May-30-14  TheBish: D Klein vs L Schut, 2013

White to play (27.?) "Difficult"

White has a strong attack, but no knockout punch just yet. First he needs to further attack Black's weak points.

27. Rf5!

Preparing 28. Ng4, with the idea of 29. Qh6! Nxh6 30. Nxh6#. The point of Rf5 first is made clear in a line like 27...Rae8 28. Ng4 Nxg4 29. Rxg5+ Nxg5 30. Qxg5+ Kf7 31. Qg7#, or 27...Rac8 28. Ng4 Nxg4 29. Rxg5+ Nxg5 30. Qxg5+ Kf7 31. Qh5+ Kg8 32. Qxg4+ Kf7 33. Qe6#.

27...h6 28. Ng4 Kh7

Not 28...Nxg4?? 29. Qg6#.

29. Rxg5! Rg8

Or 29...Nxg5 30. Qxh6+ Kg8 31. Qh8+ Kf7 32. Qg7+, winning the queen.

30. Bxe5 Rxg5

If 30...Nxe5 or 30...Nxg5, 31. Qxh6# is the answer.

31. Rxf7+ and White wins.

May-30-14  Whitehat1963: Doesn't 28. Rxg5+ work also?
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Whitehat> The deflexion with 28.Ng4 is necessary so that in the game continuation, Black could not interpose with 29....Ng6.
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Picked 27. Rf5! with the idea of 28. Rxf5 for a follow-up. Here's how it might work:

<27. Rf5! Rae8> Strongest is the game continuation 28. Ng4! ,

but 28. Rxg5+! Nxg5 29. Qxg5+ Ng6 (diagram below)


click for larger view

30. Ng4! (+9.72 @ 21 depth per Fritz 12) also wins easy.

May-30-14  chesseswar: Wait, I know this might be a really stupid question, but in the end position, can't the knight on f7 just take the rook on g5?

I'm confused.
BTW Don't hate me for the stupid question, I'm only 1700!

May-30-14  chesseswar: Oh, whoops, I see, the queen just takes it. Should've looked a bit closer!
May-30-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <Picked 27. Rf5! with the idea of 28. Rxf5> Correction: Picked 27. Rf5 with the idea of 28. Rxg5+!

One possibility after 27. Rf5! Re8 28. Rxg5+ Nxg5 29. Qxg5 Ng6 30. Ng4! (position below) is


click for larger view

30...Rf7 31. Nh6+ Kf8 32. Nxf7 Qxf7 (32... Kxf7 33. Bd8+ Kg8 34. Bxc7 ) 33. Bd8 Qxf1+ 34. Kxf1 Kg7 35. Bf6+ (+14.50 @ 20 depth per Fritz 12).

P.S.: Of course if 27. Rf5! h6 (or 27...Ng6), then 28. Ng4! is obvious and best.

May-31-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: < chrisowen: A cat f5 one for cascadence light me up baby f5,

wins a gloats over h5 anf f6 in tandem cycle one,

gun for g4 a path to his door backs up the rook f5 to spring abound aim in no time like ogle each and every free g4 to cad aim good game bishop a bone in the throat glorify oh door apperas to be f5 queen will come around gumpted for black monarck it now in judge aorta effect off in pocketive create a room queen as have mill h5 rook f5 and g5 to ponder how did I get into this mess rook up light holy water h6 or ace g4 in the pack alive all flow to reach a free conclusion fetch queen...>

!! Fascinating use of language! "...aorta effect.." !!

May-31-14  ajile: <sombreronegro: < actually this line does have some pedigree. It has been played 122 times in the CG database, with white winning 27% and black 52.5%. That is a very healthy score for black.

The line is variously known as the beefeater or Dzindi-Indian. This is what chesspublishing.com has to say about it:>

Indeed :

Game Collection: 98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

98_A40 Dzindzi Indian aka The Beefeater

It certainly can be done, but again, notice few pick up and move that e pawn controlling d6 and f6.

For example:

J Royset vs Nakamura, 2010 >

The difference already pointed out is that Black (Nakamura) never moved his e pawn weakening f6 and d6. Plus Black instead of undoubling White's c pawns won one of them.

May-31-14  Granny O Doul: While looking up the other line sometimes known in the past as the Dzindzi (bad transliteration, but that's another issue)-Indian, the autocomplete suggestion after "1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 a" was "accident".
search thread:   
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