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Dmitry Andreikin vs Vladimir Kramnik
World Cup (2013), Tromso NOR, rd 7, Sep-02
English Opening: Symmetrical. Symmetrical Variation (A36)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 11 OF 11 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-02-13  haydn20: The goldfish have been genetically modified and raised in tanks in a vast Western conspiracy to show up the superior organic free-swimming barracudas. But the time of the latter will come oh ye unbelievers.
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: It is amusing indeed to see <haydn20> converted to the ranks of True Believers, come to the concept of them pampered little buggers vs the barrycudies.
Sep-02-13  haydn20: Need I add that the goldfish have been irradiated with xylon beams and hypertachyons as well?
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "I think Andreikin is clearly underrated and deserves to play in the Candidates, but he needs to work on his openings" (Vladimir Kramnik)

Andreikin offered a draw on move 34 (realizing that he is close to losing).

33. Qf2 gxf5 34. gxf5


click for larger view

Here Andreikin offered a draw.

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <haydn20>: Most probably the conspiracy whose name you have dared utter in these pages will rate on a par with the mysterious events at Dallas and be mentioned with bated breath, lest those unfortunate souls meet with speedy retribution at the hands of the executioner.
Sep-02-13  jphamlore: Andreikin has played the English numerous times before but has not won when neither player plays an early d4 or d5? It seems to me Kramnik outmaneuvered him from the beginning into a variation where Andreikin has very little experience, and seemingly no plan.
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: "If I would win I would be second place in the ranking, so I considered playing on. I would have played on if it was totally winning, but it was not." (Vladimir Kramnik)
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Andreikin said about his typical strategy of drawing his classical games and trying to go for the tiebreaks as quickly as possible:

"I decided that my openings were not ready for this tournament. That's why I went for this strategy".

Sep-02-13  jphamlore: <cro777: (Andreikin) "I decided that my openings were not ready for this tournament. That's why I went for this strategy"> As the character Dirty Harry said in the movie Magnum Force, "A man's got to know his limitations."
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Moreover, Andreikin works on chess without a trainer. Sergey Shipov is going to ask him how is it possible to play at that level as a "lonely crusader".
Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Kramnik won the event for the first time ... and he took home $96,000 net, while Andreikin won $64,000 net.
Sep-02-13  csmath: <"If I would win I would be second place in the ranking, so I considered playing on. I would have played on if it was totally winning, but it was not." (Vladimir Kramnik)>

Not with the plan he proposed in commentary:

33. ...gxf5?
34. gxf5 Be5?!
35. Nf4 Qxf2
36. Qxf3 Rxf2

and black is "only" better.

He did have much stronger continuation for which there was no defence:

33. ...Qb2! [making room for c-passer and threatening to take a-pawn]

How is white going to stop c-passer?

34. a4 c3
35. Rd7 c2

This is now threatening promoting thus white will lose a piece, and to avoid queen exchange with check he can try

34. Kh3 [Kh1 is no better] Nc5

with threat Ne4

and white is completely hopeless.

Couple of times in the position after 25 moves he missed stronger continuations as he wanted "to play solid" in his own words. He could have smashed Andreikin here.

Even in the position they drew he had clear solid advantage probably good enough for a win.

Sep-02-13  rogge: "If I would win I would be second place in the ranking..."

Nope, he'd still be third (2801.4), Aronian has 2802.2

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: The critical position arose after 19.g4


click for larger view

Here, Andreikin thought he has advantage. Obviously, he underestimated the consequences of 19...d4.

Sep-02-13  csmath: I think he won deservingly so. He played positional masterpiece in the first game, generaly played more active than Andreikin, clearly played a model of active defence in this game and was very creative [although not particularly good] in the third game.

Only in the second game he had some fishy tactics that could have gone rather badly but was lucky enough that Andreikin got confused in the melee.

All in all, he was a better player so the success is deserving.

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Andreikin was not well prepared for this tournament (besides, he works without a trainer).

He said he had given priority to the Tal Memorial and Dortmund and he didn't have time to prepare for this event at all and in particular his openings were seriously deficient. He laughed at the success of the Torre and Trompowsky he had used to get through in earlier rounds.

Sep-02-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Andreikin played without a second, but he told Short that he had psychological support by his wife Svetlana.

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd....

Sep-02-13  csmath: <cro777: The critical position arose after 19.g4

Here, Andreikin thought he has advantage. Obviously, he underestimated the consequences of 19...d4.>

Not surprising. I think many would consider that position very uncertain and possibly better for white. I have a hard time to find anything else than 19. ...d4 but thankfully exactly this the most natural move is good enough.

It is psychologically hard to play

20. Bxb7

as no player wants to part with king's dragon while the other moves are actually inferior.

His possible error was:

24. Qf3?!

after which the tide turns completely.

However

24. Ne6

was the alternative which unfortunately releases tension after exchange sacrifice:

24. ...Rxe6
25. fxe6 c3
26. Rxf8 Bxf8
27. Qf3 Qxe6
28. Bc1

and white cannot play for a win here any more. Black knights and c-passer would become a big menace.

Sep-02-13  csmath: Looking for white errors we can focus on move

18. Ne2?!

Clearly Andreikin planned 19. g4 and 20. Ng3.

However there is an indication that queenside play was perhaps better:

18. Na4 [threatening Bxa4 and Nxc5] Qd6
19. Kh1 [to avoid Bd4+] Nd6
20. Bxa5 bxa5
21. Qd2

and white has developed some initiative on the queenside.

It is not as flashy as kingside attack but it looks good enough to proceed.

===========
Anyway I think Kramnik active defence from move 12 to move 25 was immaculate. I think he was in his element and I am not sure white would have been able to achieve anything more than a draw. Unfortunately the most direct attack as planned by Andreikin did not work out which is what usually happens when you face a stellar defence. :-)

Sep-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  Peligroso Patzer: <cro777: Kramnik won the event for the first time *** >

I believe this was also the first time Kramnik competed in the World Cup (which he apparently did only because his qualification for the 2014 Candidates Tournament - based on his second-place finish in London at the World Championship Candidates (2013)) - was contingent upon playing here).

Kramnik did play in the similarly structured tournament in Las Vegas in 1999, but that event was (preposterously) styled by FIDE as the World Chess Championship. The name was changed to World Cup in 2005.

Sep-03-13
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: That's correct. But this tournament counts as Kramnik's second appearance in this <format> having been eliminated by Michael Adams in the quarter finals of the FIDE World Championship of 1999.
Sep-04-13  PinnedPiece: <rogge: "If I would win I would be second place in the ranking..."

Nope, he'd still be third (2801.4), Aronian has 2802.2>

Maybe his calculation included an increase in Andeikin's level from the tournament results, and whom he beat, so a little higher result for his rating...

.

Sep-04-13  rogge: well, the funny thing is that Andreikin actually <lost> rating points during the world Cup (-2.8), despite qualifying for the Candidates :)

Btw, if Kramnik got 2801.5 (rather than 2801.4), he would indeed be 2nd on the next Fide ranking.

Sep-05-13  visayanbraindoctor: Despite computers favoring Black with a slight advantage for most of the game, I would think that in actual human play, it's a double-edged tactically difficult "complicated" game where more often than not the last one to err is the one to lose.

While such games as this are ongoing, computer evaluations that kibitzers follow may be a bit misleading as predictors as to who would win.

In such double edged tactical games, one can often see computer evals swinging wildly as the human players keep on making slight inaccuracies.

Sep-05-13  Nerwal: <Despite computers favoring Black with a slight advantage for most of the game, I would think that in actual human play, it's a double-edged tactically difficult "complicated" game where more often than not the last one to err is the one to lose.>

Right. I have no idea why some people wanted black to play 26... ♕xd4 like a chess engine. 26... ♕d6 is a much better practical move, especially since he doesn't need to win at all cost.

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