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Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen
Carlsen - Anand World Championship Match (2014), Sochi RUS, rd 1, Nov-08
Gruenfeld Defense: Exchange Variation (D85)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

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Viswanathan Anand vs Magnus Carlsen (2014)


Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 31 OF 32 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-09-14  jphamlore: <visayanbraindoctor:
Anand is one of the best tacticians of all time, but somehow he doesn't strike me as overaggressive. After 20... Rd6, Anand chooses the more solid 21. Rhe1. While Kasparov or Alekhine, the two greatest attacking players in chess history, would undoubtedly have chosen 21. h4 leaving the rook at h1 in order to support a direct Kingside attack. The weakness of doubled pawns and isolanis would not matter when tactics and attack begin to dominate the board, and the open files incurred in their creation might even prove useful.>

Greetings, your posts are always well thought and welcome.

This is a position where regardless of computer evaluation, an opponent of Anand is bringing a knife to a gunfight, Game 3 of Anand - Kramnik 2008:

Kramnik vs Anand, 2008

after 16. ♖d1:


click for larger view

Anand's bishops and Queen are lined up pointed kingside and the rooks have open files. Kasparov is maybe the only player Anand regularly played who could go toe-to-toe with Anand in such positions and expect to defeat Anand. Other great players such as an older Karpov on a good day and now Carlsen know how to de-fang such positions before they even develop against Anand.

Now look at this position from Game 1 of this match with Carlsen after 12. .. ♘e5:


click for larger view

No one would say this is a bad position objectively for White or that White does not have chances. In any case, up to that point Anand was apparently totally still in his opening preparation as he had consumed only 4 minutes of time as opposed to 25 minutes for Carlsen. And yet ... and yet we can already see that for the particular player Anand as White, he has no hope of actually winning this game. Carlsen has once again arranged for one of Anand's bishops to be lost, and other one is somewhat inactive behind Anand's own pawns.

And this is what I see happening over and over again in recent games between Carlsen and Anand. Carlsen, who has spent days blitzing openings with Anand when he was helping Anand prepare for earlier Anand title matches, simply knows Anand's game inside and out, and also knows how to put Anand in positions where Anand is not as comfortable pursuing a win.

Nov-09-14  Chris321: < Hesam7: <Olsonist: Tight game between two giants.> Hardly. Anand started the game with White pieces and had a massive advantage on the clock. Yet he still ended up with a losing position towards the end. As many commentators have poin...> now with that evaluation i agree 100%,it is obvious that Anand -"survived" this,not like some wanne think that things was so "level"in this game.What if Carlsen used this game as a "feeler",a confidence booster and then waiting for the right time when Anand feels safe and secure and sure of himself and the NUKE him to destruction,then those that think that this game was so level will sing a new tune!.All this is not new Alekhine,Lasker,Tal,Fisher they had many such mass weapons of destruction!.
Nov-09-14  SugarDom: <jphamlore: Carlsen rarely plays the Gruenfeld as Black, but when he does, he plays it absolutely perfectly. I wish all the other young guns in today's game would study how Carlsen handles this opening, attending to above all the task of stopping the creation of a passed pawn in the center for White from ever occurring. If everyone else would play the Gruenfeld like Carlsen does, mainly as a drawing weapon, the Gruenfeld would because a perfectly safe defense to use at these highest levels.>

From the same guy who said young players should stick to QGD.

Nov-09-14  Pulo y Gata: Isn't the Gruenfeld busted or is Carlsen god?
Nov-09-14  paulogoulard: Any thoughts on why such an unusual move as 8...Nc6? Preparation, or just Magnus improvising in the opening, as usual? Also, Anand was playing so fast after that move that he seemed to be even more prepared for it than for the typical c5. He seemed to know exactly what he wanted: forcing the f6 push and making room for the bishop to go to h3 (11.Bxg7 was the novelty that made it all possible). None of this would have been possible, however, if Carlsen had stuck to the main line. I suspect that Vishy used some "old" preparation he had against the Grunfeld.
Nov-09-14  fgh: Somebody has posted the following analysis of 42. ... Re3 on Chessbomb. Here it is:

<Winning line of the 1st game according to sf with 39-49 depth analyzing each move:

42. ...Re3 43. Qd1 Qxd1 44. Rxd1 b5 45. Rd7+ Kh6 46. Rd5 Rb3 47. f5 gxf5 48. Rxf5 Kg6 49. Rf1 Rh3 50. Rg1+ Kf5 51. Rg8 Ke4 52. Re8+ Kf4 53. Rb8 Rb3 54. Rh8 f5 55. Kb1 Re3 56. h4 Rh3 57. Kc2 Kg4 58. Rb8 f4 59. Rxb5 Kg3 60. Kd2 Rh2+ 61. Kd3 f3 62. Rg5+ Kf4 63. Rg8 Rh1 64. Rf8+ Kg3 65. Rg8+ Kf2 66. Rg4 Rg1 67. Rxa4 Kg3 68. Ra5 f2 69. Rf5 f1Q+ 70. Rxf1 Rxf1 0-1


click for larger view

Mate in 29 according to 6-men egtb.>

Nov-09-14  ahmadov: After the Candidates Tournament, Anand raised expectations again, but the counterplay by Carlsen in this game shows that it will be very difficult for the Indian tiger to get back the title.
Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <<Somebody has posted the following analysis of 42. ... Re3 on Chessbomb. Here it is:

<Winning line of the 1st game according to sf with 39-49 depth analyzing each move:

42. ...Re3>

I'm still interested in what happens after 43.Rd7+. What are the evaluations after 43...Kh6 and ...Kf8? If ...Re3 is really winning, what's the losing move?

Nov-09-14  tesasembiring: No surprised in the first game, but Magnus should becarefull because the tiger(Anand) seems not had the teeth but he had. Anand exsworldchamphion rapid,online and tournament will plunder your title if you are not becarefull,great game oh i should say dreams game.
Nov-09-14  Ulhumbrus: 9 Nf3 invites 9...Bg4 followed by ...Bxf3. If after that White lacks time to make his centre count eg because (as Svidler indicated) Black may play the moves ...e5 and ...Qh4 one alternative is 9 0-0-0 at once.
Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <IndianFan> This comment about Anand is completely off base <And it doesn't hurt to have a personality, which also he sadly lacks both on and off the chessboard> Anand is personable, engaging, self-deprecating and humorous. For instance, last year Anand was analyzing a 2-rook ending with the commentator, who admitted he was rated "barely 1200". Three times during this post-mortem the "barely 1200" rated commentator interrupted Anand with better moves than what Anand was suggesting. On the third suggestion, Anand burst out laughing stating "These rook endings can sure be tricky". Its this quality, this humbleness, that his fans find so endearing

<Take it from me - I may not be much of a chess player> I'd have to agree with this. Perhaps stick to checkers or tic-tac-toe

*****

Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <Anand is personable, engaging, self-deprecating and humorous>

Not when talking to Karlovich.

Nov-09-14  Chris321: < csmath: <The Gruenfeld will be shown eventually to be a forced loss for black in most lines.> My guess is that you have no clue what you are talking about, like few others...> here >ya strange comment that!.But Generally the Grunfeld can "maybe"be used in the"right"circumstances,against the "right"opponent!.But if you feel uncomfortable or has lost too many games because you have neglected the centre or don't exactly know what to do with the centre,then i would say stay far away from the Grunfeld or Alekhine,because you will find yourself on the wrong side of space,and if you don't know how to break out or how to break when then you are quite dead in the water like a sitting duck.Play Nimzo or QGD instead!.My 2cents.
Nov-09-14  Chris321: O ya forgot to mention:in the hands of strong players even so called inferior openings can be deadly weapons!
Nov-09-14  Chris321: I wonder how many of us on here will draw against a 2500 player if we had the white pieces in the position 1e4 f6,if not,let him take any pawn off with the same opening moves and so on ,maybe we will be very imbarrased when he later take his rook off and still wins :)
Nov-09-14  Cheapo by the Dozen: What was the refutation, if any, to 16 Rd5?

I'm thinking both of White's pawn structure and of the possibility of an attack with 17 Rxe5, balanced off against Black's play on the c-file and against White's pawns.

Nov-09-14  Everett: <IndianFan: <Wavy> There is an interview of Bob Dylan by Ed Bradley in which he asks him something like where did some his songs come from and Dylan says he doesn't know and that he cannot produce those kinds of songs anymore.>

Perhaps he is tired of finding inspiration from others' words http://ask.metafilter.com/122822/Wh...

Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Pulo y Gata: Isn't the Gruenfeld busted or is Carlsen god?>

No and no. Both are good, though.

Nov-09-14  Pulo y Gata: <keypusher: <Pulo y Gata: Isn't the Gruenfeld busted or is Carlsen god?> No and no. Both are good, though.>

Right. I still think Carlsen was lucky to draw here. Just imagine how long <jphamlore> would rattle against the stupid choice of opening if he lost. I guess we are all lucky.

Nov-09-14  Everett: <Anand is one of the best tacticians of all time, but somehow he doesn't strike me as overaggressive. After 20... Rd6, Anand chooses the more solid 21. Rhe1. While Kasparov or Alekhine, the two greatest attacking players in chess history, would undoubtedly have chosen 21. h4 leaving the rook at h1 in order to support a direct Kingside attack. The weakness of doubled pawns and isolanis would not matter when tactics and attack begin to dominate the board, and the open files incurred in their creation might even prove useful.>

I agree with this. I think sometimes a certain kind of belligerence is necessary in certain positions, and against certain opposition.

Imagine the attitude Alekhine and Kasparov had to have to dethrone their respective positional machines.

Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: How ironic.

Yesterday Qb7 saved Anand.
Today it killed him.

Nov-09-14  Absentee: <Pulo y Gata: Right. I still think Carlsen was lucky to draw here.>

How was he lucky to draw? Black had a solid position through the whole game, if not a slight edge.

Nov-09-14  Pulo y Gata: Read my whole post, Absentee. You're slacking on the fun.
Nov-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: <Pulo y Gata.....I still think Carlsen was lucky to draw here. Just imagine how long <jphamlore> would rattle against the stupid choice of opening if he lost. I guess we are all lucky.>

LMAO

Nov-10-14  Boris Schipkov: This game with my notes http://www.chessib.com/carlsen-anan....
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