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Baskaran Adhiban vs Aleksey Dreev
Tata Steel Challengers (2016), Wijk aan Zee NED, rd 7, Jan-23
Semi-Slav Defense: Stoltz Variation (D45)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  WorstPlayerEver: Orc orc orc you eat soup with a fork.
Jul-04-17  AlicesKnight: 21.Rxd7 looks the most obvious - if the Q captures then 22.Bb5 wins it, and while Black is left with 2 Rs for the Q his position is scattered and open to a Q/N attack (assuming he avoid snap mates on the back rank).
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: A little tricky for a Tuesday.

The first thing to notice is that somewhere along the line we've dropped a rook. So winning material, on its own, doesn't win the game for us. We've got to win back a rook's worth of bits to draw level and then win some more.

This puzzle really hinges on the fact that the black king isn't castled, which makes at least one of his rooks useless and possibly both.

After the Tuesday solution of 21. Rxd7 we first have to deal with Walter's 21...Qxc4


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Black doesn't mind giving up his queen if it allows him to activate his rooks. A pair of rooks ought to own a queen. Unfortunately (for Black) white has two strong replies. 22. Rd8+ is a double check which wins the queen and crucially keeps the black king on the back rank where it interferes with the rooks. But the killer move is 22. Qxc4


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Black can't play 22...Kxd7 because this runs into 23. Ne5+ and a strong attack. Fritzie calls it mate in eight.

The next question was posed by <PB>. What about 23...Ke7?


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White doesn't have a clean kill from here, but he does have several moves which keep the pressure on. Take your pick from 24. Ne5, Qe5+, Qa6, Qg5+. White's queen and knight have all the play while black's three pieces are all playing "hunt the corner".

Finally, we have to deal with the game continuation. Why does black resign after 24. Qb3?


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It's the same old story about the uncastled king and bystander rooks. Black has no good square to retreat his attacked bishop. 24...Bc5 looks as natural as anything, but it runs into 25. Ne5 threatening Qxf7+. It's the same problem with 24...Be7.

24... Bd6 has the merit of stopping Ne5, but white still wins easily with either 25. Qd5 or Ng5.

How do we call this one? The starting tactic of 21...Rxd7 is Tuesday-ish. The rest of the puzzle is a little more complicated, IMHO.

Jul-04-17  drollere: Qb3 is a nice touch. it wins the KB while neutralizing any defensive rook moves.
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Hi <Once>,

Not seeing Fritzie's mate in 8, I would play 22. Qxa3, threatening Qe7#. The king can't take the rook because of the royal fork on Ne5 and the white Q covers c1. If 23. Qd6 Rd5 threatening Re4.

The most problematic response would be 22. Qc5 Qa4 23 b5 (if Qc1 Rd1+) Qd1 and maybe now black can castle into safety so it might not work.

Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <ChessHigherCat:> 22. Qxa3 Qc5 23. Qa4 0-0


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Black has the advantage. He is the exchange up and his king is now safe. Fritzie calls this -2, which seems about right.

Fritzie's mate in eight (after 21...Qc4) is:

21... Qc4 22. Qxc4 Kxd7 23. Ne5+
Ke7 24. Qxf7+ Kd6 25. Qd5+ Ke7 26. Qd7+ Kf6 27. Ng4+ Kg5 28. Qf5+ Kh4 29. g3+ Kh3 30. Qh5#

Those black rooks never moved!

Jul-04-17  saturn2: I saw 21 RxN
a..QxR 22 Bb5 and
b..QxB 22 QxQ KxR 23 Qd3 Bd6 24 e5
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <21.Rxd7> and thats all folks

*****

Jul-04-17  Cheapo by the Dozen: This one has a lot of variations for a Tuesday, But it's pretty clear that Rxd7 wins the queen, maintains an attack, and doesn't leave White subject to a back rank mate.
Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: 21.Rxd7 Qxd7 22.Bb5 and 23.Bxd7 wins material.
Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: My Stockfish recommends 22...O-O-O 23.Bxd7+ Rxd7 24.Ne5 Rd2 25.g3 Bc5 26.Qc6+ Kb8 27.Nd7+ Rxd7 28.Qxd7.
Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: After his decision to sacrifice the rook (which Stockfish evaluates as equal), White immediately turned into Stockfish. Black however didn't...
Jul-04-17  ColeTrane: It Smells like stockfish mongers around here....!
Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: Black could have held with <20...a6 21.Nd4 g6 22.Bb2 Ra7 23.Nc6 b5 24.Bxb5 axb5 25.Qxa7 Qxc6 26.Rxd7 Qxd7 27.Qb8+ Qd8 28.Qxb5+ Kf8 29.Bxh8> or <21.Rxd7 Qxd7 22.Bxf7+ Kd8 23.Qxd7+ Kxd7 24.Ne5+ Kc7 25.Bxe7>. Very thin lines though.
Jul-04-17  drollere: <With Dreev doing so well here, this game practically determines the winner.>

not sure what that means, but the exchange sacrifice with 15. e4 is impressively bold and shows adihban's confidence that his lead in development after 19. Bxc4 would prevail.

Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <1.d4 d5 2.c4 c6 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.Nf3 e6 5.e3 Nbd7 6.Qc2 b6 7.Bd3 Bb7 8.O-O Be7 9.b3 dxc4 10.bxc4 c5 11.d5 exd5 12.cxd5 Nxd5 13.Nxd5 Bxd5 14.Rd1 Bf6 15.e4!?> This is apparently a novelty, as it's the only game with this move in the chessgames.com opening explorer.

Previously played was 15. Bb5 as in the draw in I Khairullin vs B Grachev, 2014, 15. Be4 as in the draw in Huzman vs Dreev, 2014 and 15. Rb1 as in Black's win in A Giri vs Mamedyarov, 2012.

<15...c4?> After White's 15. e4!? novelty, Black makes a not-so-obvious error with the mistimed in-between move 15...c5? which gives White a strong advantage after 16. Bxc4 , 16. Bf1 or 16. Be2 as in the game.

Better instead is 15...Bc6 16.e5 Bxf3 17.exf6 Bxd1 18.fxg7 Rg8 19.Qxd1 Qf6 20.Qe2+ Qe5 21.Bh6 Qxe2 22.Bxe2 O-O-O 23.Bg4 Kc7 24.Bf4+ Kc8 25.Bh6 = (0.00 @ 31 depth, Stockfish 8)

or

15...Bxa1 16.exd5 Kf8 17.d6 g6 18.Bf4 Bf6 19.Bh6+ Bg7 20.Bg5 Bf6 21.Bh6+ = (0.00 @ 31 depth, Stockfish 8)

<16.Be2 Bxa1> This is now Black's best, but stronger would have been taking the Rook one move earlier with 15...Bxa1 = as analyzed above.

<17.Rxd5 Qc7> This may be as good as any move in a bad position, but the computer indicates Black can put up more resistance with 17...Qe7 18.Bg5 Bf6 19.Bf4 Qe6 20.Qa4 Rc8 21.Ne5 O-O 22.Bg4 Qe7 23.Bxd7 Rc5 24.Rxc5 bxc5 25.Nxc4 Qxe4 26.Ne3 Qb1+ 27.Nf1 Qb4 28.g3 Qxa4 29.Bxa4 c4 30.Ne3 Rc8 31.Kg2 Rc5 32.Bc2 g6 33.Kf3 (+1.00 @ 27 depth, Stockfish 8)

<18.Ba3 Bf6 19.Bxc4 Be7 20.Qa4 Bxa3?> This is clearly Black's decisive error.

Instead Black can complicate, put up much more resistance and create practical drawing chances with 20...a6 21.Bb5 Rd8 22.Qxa6 O-O 23.Bxe7 Ra8 24.Qxa8 Rxa8 25.Rxd7 Qc1+ 26.Bf1 Qc2 27.a3 Qxe4 28.Bb4 h6 29.Nd2 Qc6 30.Rd4 { to (+1.58 @ 26 depth, Stockfish 8)

<21.Rxd7! > (+2.93 @ 27 depth, Stockfish 8) This strong but simple move solves today's Tuesday July 4, 2017 puzzle with a pinning combination.

<21...Qxd7 22.Bb5 Qxb5 23.Qxb5+ Kf8> Also losing for Black is 23...Ke7 24.Qe5+ Kf8 25.Qd5 Rc8 26.g3 f6 27.Nd4 Rg8 28.Qd7 Re8 29.Ne6+ Rxe6 30.Qxe6 Be7 31.a4 Bc5 32.Qc8+ Kf7 33.Qd7+ Kg6 34.e5 Rf8 35.e6 f5 36.e7 Bxe7 37.Qxe7 (+6.28 @ 30 depth, Stockfish 8)

<24.Qb3 1-0> Black resigns as he has nothing better than 24...Kg8 25.Ne5 Rf8 26.Qxa3 (+6.60 @ 26 depth, Stockfish 8)

P.S.: Bottom line is Black should have played 15...Bxa1 = right away and not have wasted time with the in-between maneuver 15...c4 16. Be2 Bxa1 .

Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: <Patzer2> My Stockfish 7 agrees that 21.Bb5 is a reasonable line, but evaluates the resulting position as only 1.06 @depth 28.


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In reality, White's advantage might be even lower if White's light square Bishop can't get rid of its "tall pawn" function.

Jul-04-17  Iwer Sonsch: Alternatively, Black can play 25...Qc2 26.a3 Qxe4 27.Bb4 Rc8 28.Nd2 Qf5 29.a4 Qf4 30.Bc4.
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White is a rook down.

The possibility of a pin along a4-e8 suggests 21.Rxd7:

A) 21... Qxd7 22.Bb5

A.1) 22... Qxb5 23.Qxb5+

A.1.a) 23... Kf8 24.Ne5

A.1.a.i) 24... f6 25.Qd5 fxe5 (25... Ke7(8) 26.Qd7+ Kf8 27.Qf7#) 26.Qxa8+ and 27.Qxh8 + - [Q vs b].

A.1.a.ii) 24... Be7 (due to Qb3) 25.Qd5 wins.

A.1.a.iii) 24... Rc8 25.g3

A.1.a.iii.1) 24... f6 25.Qd7 wins (25... fxe5 26.Qxc8+, etc.).

A.1.a.iii.2) 24... Re8 25.Qd5 Rxe5 (25... Re7(6) 26.Qd8+ Re8 27.Nd7+ Kg8 28.Qxe8+ Bf8 29.Qxf8#) 26.Qxe5 followed by Qb8 wins the remaining rook.

A.1.a.iii.3) 24... Rc7 25.Qd5 Re7 26.Qd8+ as above.

A.1.a.iv) 24... Rd8 25.Qb3 Ke7 26.Qxa3+ (or 26.Nc6+) wins decisive material.

A.1.b) 23... Kd8 24.Qd3+ + - [Q+N vs 2r].

A.1.c) 23... Ke7 24.Ne5

A.1.c.i) 24... Ra(h)d8 25.Nc6+ and 26.Nxd8 + - [Q vs r+b].

A.1.c.ii) 24... Rhc8 25.Qd7+ Kf6 (25... Kf8 26.Qxf6#) 26.Ng4+ Kg5 (26... Kg6 27.Qf5#) 27.Qf5+ Kh4 28.g3+ Kh3 29.Qh5#.

A.2) 22... Rd8 23.Bxd7+ wins decisive material (23... Rxd7 24.Ne5).

B) 21... Qxc4 22.Qxc4 Kxd7 23.Qd3+ Bd6 24.e5 + - [Q+N vs 2r].

C) 21... Qc5 22.Rd5+ b5 23.Bxb5+ wins decisive material.

Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: The text 24.Qb3 (initially my first option but I don't remember why I rejected it) is stronger than my 24.Ne5, according to Stockfish.
Jul-04-17  Ariogermano: If. 21. Bb5 Qc1 22.Rd1
Jul-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <21.Bb5> is perfectly good too, to secure the White victory

*****

Jul-05-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <morfishine: <21.Bb5> is perfectly good too, to secure the White victory>

A little too slow, I think. As White starts today's puzzle a rook down, black can afford to lose some material.

After 21. Bb5 black gets out of trouble with 21...0-0 or 21...0-0-0. White will be able to snaffle one of black's minor pieces, meaning that black is still ahead by the exchange.

Jul-05-17  Whitehat1963: Very weird. When I looked at this linking from the puzzle position, the moves list only went to move 14. But when I looked at later kibitzing, the complete game appeared.
Jul-05-17  Whitehat1963: And then, when I clicked on earlier kibitzing, the moves list shrank to 27 moves! I don't know if it's my phone or your site or what.
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