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Ian Nepomniachtchi vs Shakhriyar Mamedyarov
Tal Memorial (2016), Moscow RUS, rd 6, Oct-02
Italian Game: Italian Variation (C50)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 5 times; par: 97 [what's this?]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-02-16  fisayo123: I thought Nepo had ruined his advantage with 17.Nc5! but it proved to be an ingenious pawn sac. Black is just in an irresistible bind after 21.Bb2! Impressive stuff from the Russian.
Oct-02-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: black can't stop the white King from getting to g6?
Oct-02-16  blackdranzer: Did named missed a draw ? 42...Rc5 looks to be a fortress, with c6-Rc4-b5 set up, black king is cut off. Also, 42...Kg8 looks fine, preserving the f pawn.
Oct-02-16  blackdranzer: HMM , g4 and f5 creates a wall and king marches on to g6. Further, black rook does not have a nic outpost
Oct-02-16  Ulhumbrus: If White's bishop becomes too powerful after 18...Qxc5 the move 17 Nc5 counts as a threat
Oct-02-16  dunkenchess: Nice job.
Oct-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Did n[M]amed missed a draw ? 42...Rc5 looks to be a fortress, with c6-Rc4-b5 set up, black king is cut off.>

From Robert Hess's commentary on chess.com: "42... Rc5 43. Qxf7 - without the f7 pawn, there will never be even a fantasy of a fortress. Winning ideas include marching the king up the board, f4-f5 (and f6, if you allow me), and gobbling up the queenside pawns. There's hardly anything Black can do to counter these threats" (https://www.chess.com/news/nepomnia...)

Alexey Korotylev, in his live commentary on chesspro (http://chesspro.ru/chessonline/app2...), gave 42.Qd7 a double exclamation mark because it prevents what he claims is Black's best setup for a fortress - rook on f5, pawns on g6 & h5.

Oct-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: The "Quiet Game" (i.e. Giuoco Piano) is starting to make some noise at the highest levels of Chess, as this game between two 2700+ super GMs attests.

In this game, White puts a positional squeeze on Black after 6...h6 7. a4, and secures a lasting advantage which he eventually translates into a win.

A couple of other recent Giuoco Piano contests between 2700+ GMs, resulting in a win for White include Karjakin vs Navara, 2016 and W So vs A Giri, 2016.

Oct-03-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <A couple of other recent Giuoco Piano contests between 2700+ GMs, resulting in a win for White include Karjakin vs Navara, 2016 and W So vs A Giri, 2016>

As well as, among others, Kramnik's wins over Anand from this tournament and over Radjabov from the Olympiad. This game actually followed Karjakin vs Navara up to move 14, where Mamedyarov improved somewhat over Navara's play (with ...Ne7 instead of b5, after which Black collapsed very quickly), but the weakening of the central dark squares that results from 13...d5 still looks very dangerous for Black.

Nov-01-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Open Defence: 13...Qd7 was an alternative but perhaps Black did not want to endure a slow squeeze

also on move 14...dxe4 is an alternative

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