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Daniil Dubov vs Anish Giri
FIDE Grand Prix Moscow (2019), Moscow RUS, rd 1, May-18
Queen's Gambit Declined: Traditional Variation (D30)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-18-19  johnkr: Hey I know that chessgames has to support itself by doing advertising but I'm looking at a big sexy booty here. Not appropriate for a chess web site?
May-18-19  Imran Iskandar: Indeed a masterpiece. 0-0-0 and Kb1 are the sort of moves I wouldn’t ever have the guts to play.
May-19-19  goodevans: Did Dubov say what he had planned against <19...Qb6>?

I think it was probably still <20.Nb5>.


click for larger view

Now after <20...Qxd4> white can get a good game with 21.Nc7+ Kd7 22.Rxd4+ Kxc7 23.Rxb4 but I think he'd have chosen instead to keep up the pressure with <21.Rxd4 Na6 22.Ne5>.

May-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <goodevans: Did Dubov say what he had planned against <19...Qb6>? I think it was probably still <20.Nb5>.

Now after <20...Qxd4> white can get a good game with 21.Nc7+ Kd7 22.Rxd4+ Kxc7 23.Rxb4 but I think he'd have chosen instead to keep up the pressure with <21.Rxd4 Na6 22.Ne5>>

Yeah, he actually mentioned in an interview at the studio after the game that he planned Nb5 after 19...Qb6 as well, though without giving variations - https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_...

But in fact, Black should be ok after 19...Qb6 - 20.Nb5 is even losing to 20...Qc6+! 21.Kb1/b2 Na6 and now, with no Qd7+, the position of the black king is stabilized and the exposed position of the white king comes into play.

May-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

There is a book out there called: "Startling Castling!" this one will appear in Vol II.


click for larger view

White played 19.0-0-0.

The more you look at it the more it makes sense. Unpins the Knight, hits the Black Queen and threatens mate on d8.

Presented with that position by a colleague 'White to play'.

Looking for a brillo move the Mieses in me would have quickly opted for 19.Rb1 Bxc3+ 20.Qxc3 Qxb1+ and Qxh1 then Qc8 mate. but alas it is totally unsound - Black does not take the 2nd Rook.

(J M Craddock vs J Mieses, 1939 - has lost me a few games trying emulate a Double Rook sac. Have one OTB win with it.)

Not sure if I had stumbled on 0-0-0. Maybe...I'd have seen 19.Rd1 that sets up a trick or two but it is easily countered.

Nah! you have to be honest to yourself. I'd have gone 19.Rd1 and blamed the Tarrasch in me. Looks like I need a dash of Dubov!

Wonderful game of chess.

***

May-19-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: There's another book out there, <Bobby Fischer's Outrageous Chess Moves> by Bruce Pandolfini. The physiogonomical resemblance between Dubov and the teenage Fischer being so marked, that, if one were so minded, the possibility of reincarnation cannot be ruled out.
May-19-19  beenthere240: 15 . Bb5+ surprised me.
May-20-19  Ulhumbrus: Can one suggest a reason why after 18...Qa5 Black's king instead of White's king is in the greater danger despite the removal of White's king's pawn cover?

One example of a possible answer is three things help White.

Firstly, if Black's king's rook is undeveloped White is playing with an extra rook.

Secondly, Black is undeveloped

Thirdly, White's pawn on f6 places Black's king in danger as well as well as White's king.

In this particular position these three things taken together happen to outweigh the removal of White's king's pawn cover.

Perhaps in a slightly different position the opposite will be true and it will be then White's king which is in the greater danger.

May-20-19  Ulhumbrus: Can one suggest a reason why after 18...Qa5 Black's king instead of White's king is in the greater danger despite the removal of White's king's pawn cover?

One example of a possible answer is that three things help White.

Firstly, if Black's king's rook is undeveloped White is playing with an extra rook.

Secondly, Black is undeveloped

Thirdly, White's pawn on f6 places Black's king in danger as well as well as White's king.

In this particular position these three things taken together happen to outweigh the removal of White's king's pawn cover.

Perhaps in a slightly different position the opposite will be true and it will be then White's king which is in the greater danger.

May-20-19  Everett: That's a nice mate, congrats to Dubov.
May-21-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: wild opening! Home prep? The pawn on f6 is a monster block. Looks like one of Alekhine's games.
May-21-19  Pulo y Gata: 19. O-O-O was forced
May-21-19  adhvaitha: This game should be named

“Dubov immortal: King safety? Meh”

May-21-19  gokusano: <The physiogonomical resemblance between Dubov and the teenage Fischer being so marked, that, if one were so minded, the possibility of reincarnation cannot be ruled out.> And Giri plays like Karpov. Fischer vs. Karpov? Of course, not.
May-22-19  Everett: Lame, lets stop summoning spirits and move forward. All these players are standing on the shoulder's of giants, yet lets give them credit for doing so! It's not so easy.
May-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <wild opening! Home prep?>

Partly, but a certain mistake in White's play indicates that the prep wasn't <that> deep (which overall probably makes the game more impressive, not less). 18.Ne5! would have been much stronger than 18.Nxc3, which allows Black to (at least) equalize with 19...Qb6! instead of Qa5? as played by Giri. (It forces a queen exchange, and - as I noted in a previous comment - 20.Nb5? would now actually lose to 20...Qc6+! followed by Na6.)

May-23-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal:


click for larger view

Btw, it's worth pointing out a spectacular deflection idea that comes with 20.Nb5 - 20...a6? 21.Qxb4!! Qxb4 22.Nc7+ Kf8 23.Rd8# (in other words, 20.Nb5 comes with the threat of Qxb4).

May-24-19  Kirth Gersen: Eyal, you suggest that Dubov’s brillaincy wasn't all prep because he played the suboptimal 18.Nxc3, but I'm not so sure, because lately people have flocked to the Lasker/Carlsen approach of "better to play against the guy in front of me than against his preparation". Maybe Dubov prepared this and deliberately played the worse move. This especially makes sense against a theory monster like Giri.
May-24-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <Kirth Gersen> Dubov's play at this point wasn't just "suboptimal" in some subtle way; it's allowing Black to equalize with one precise move (19...Qb6) as opposed to getting a huge - probably winning - advantage. So playing like that while knowing in advance the value of both moves would have been just plain stupid. Besides, it's quite clear that Dubov was out of prep by this stage in the way he's talking about the game - as I already mentioned in a previous comment (which has a link to the post-game interview), he says he was thinking of meeting 19...Qb6 with 20.Nb5, which is just losing by force. It's also quite clear from the time he was spending on his moves by this stage (see https://chess24.com/en/watch/live-t...) - ca. 8 minutes on move 15, 11 minutes on move 17, 10 minutes on move 18.
May-24-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  harrylime: Gotta say I was talkin abooot Dubov on this site a few years back ...

lol lol lol

Jun-05-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. + / = (0.53): 22...Bc5 23.Ne5 Rh7 24.Rd2 Kg8 25.Rhd1 Qb4+ 26.Rb2 Qe4+ 27.Nd3 Bf8 28.Nc3 Qc4 29.Ne2 Qe4 30.f3 Nc5 31.fxe4 Nxd7 32.e5 Nb6 33.Nd4 h5 34.Nc6 Nd5 35.Rb3 Rh6 36.Rc1 Rg6 37.g3 Bh6 38.Rc2 Rc8 39.Ne7+ Nxe7 40.fxe7

2. + / - (0.71): 22...Rh7 23.Nfd4 Bc5 24.Nb3 Qb6 25.Rd2 Kg8 26.Rc1 h5 27.Rc3 Rf8 28.Nd6 Bb4 29.Rc6 Qb8 30.Rc8 Bxd2 31.Rxb8 Rxb8 32.Qa4 Bh6 33.Kb2 Nc5 34.Qxa7 Rxb3+ 35.Kc2 Rd3 36.Qxc5 Rd5 37.Qc8+ Bf8 38.Ne4 Rh6 39.Qc7 Rg6 40.g3 Rg4

3. + - (2.41): 22...Kg8 23.Ne5 Rf8 24.Nc6 Qb6 25.Nxb4 Nxb4 26.Rd4 h5 27.Rxb4 Qxf2 28.Nd6 Rh6 29.Rd1 Rg6 30.g3 Qxf6 31.Qxa7 Rg4 32.Rxg4+ hxg4 33.Kc2 Rd8 34.Qb7 Qg6+ 35.Ne4 Rxd1 36.Kxd1 Qg7 37.Qb4 Qa1+ 38.Ke2 Qa2+ 39.Qd2 Qc4+ 40.Ke3

Jun-05-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 24 dpa done

<1. = (-0.16): 19...Qb6> 20.Kc2 Qxd4 21.Nxd4 Bxc3 22.Kxc3 Nd7 23.Nb5 Rc8+ 24.Kd3 0-0 25.Nxa7 Rc5 26.Rc1 Rg5 27.g3 Ra8 28.Rc7 Nxf6 29.Rb1 Rd5+ 30.Ke2 Ne8 31.Rcb7 Kg7 32.Kf3 Rd2 33.R1b6 Nd6 34.Rc7 e5 35.Rd7 Nc4 36.Rxd2 Nxd2+ 37.Ke2 Nc4 38.Rb7 Nd6 39.Rd7

<2. + / = (0.53): 19...Qa5 20.Nb5 Na6 21.Qd7+ Kf8 22.Kb1> Bc5 23.Ne5 Rh7 24.Rd2 Kg8 25.Rb2 Rd8 26.Qb7 Nb4 27.Rc1 Bf8 28.Nc4 Qa4 29.Qc7 Rd3 30.Nc3 Qc6 31.Qxc6 Nxc6 32.Rb7 Rd4 33.Nb5 Rg4 34.Ncd6 Nb4 35.Rc4 Rxc4 36.Nxc4 Nd5

Jun-05-19  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 22 dpa done

1. + / = (0.42): 19.Nd2 Bxc3 20.Qxc3 Nc6 21.Nc4 Qb4 22.Qxb4 Nxb4 23.Nd6+ Kf8 24.Ke2 Nd5 25.Rhc1 Nxf6 26.Rc7 Rh7 27.Raxa7 Rxa7 28.Rxa7 Rg7 29.g3 Nd5 30.Kd3 f6 31.Ra8+ Ke7 32.Nb5 f5 33.Rh8 Rg6 34.Kd4 Kf6 35.f4 Kg7 36.Ra8 Kf6 37.Nd6

2. = (0.12): 19.Ne5 Nd7 20.Nd3 Bxc3+ 21.Qxc3 0-0 22.0-0 a5 23.Rfe1 Rfc8 24.Qa3 Qg5 25.Rad1 Qxf6 26.h3 Rc4 27.Re3 e5 28.Rde1 e4 29.Qb3 Rc3 30.Qb7 Qc6 31.Qxc6 Rxc6 32.Rxe4 a4 33.Rd4 Nf6 34.Ne5 Rc2

3. = (-0.09): 19.0-0-0 Qb6 20.Qxb6 axb6 21.Ne4 Nc6 22.h3 Ra4 23.Kc2 0-0 24.Ra1 b5 25.Kb2 Rfa8 26.Rxa4 Rxa4 27.Ra1 Kh7 28.Rxa4 bxa4 29.Ka2 Kg8 30.Nh2 Kf8 31.Ng4 h5 32.Nh6 Nd4

Aug-04-19  WTHarvey: Ends with a 'White mates in 3'.


click for larger view

37. Nxf7+
if 37...Rhxf7 38. Qh6+ Rh7 39. Qxf8#
or if 37... Rfxf7 38. Rd8+ Rf8 39. Rxf8#

In both cases, mate is delivered with a capture on f8 by a different piece.

Aug-04-19  Everett: <ay-18-19 johnkr: Hey I know that chessgames has to support itself by doing advertising but I'm looking at a big sexy booty here. Not appropriate for a chess web site?>

Most ads come up based on other sites you’ve visited

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