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Magnus Carlsen vs Levon Aronian
Norway Chess (2020), Stavanger NOR, rd 10, Oct-16
Queen's Gambit Declined: Three Knights Variation. General (D37)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Oct-20-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Magnus put the mockers on himself in this good previous round report by Peter Doggers. https://www.chess.com/news/view/car...

When discussing this game A Firouzja vs Carlsen, 2020 Magnus added:

"Giving him [Firouzja] a bit of an unpleasant memory, I think that's not something that's a bad thing for me."

Which reminds me of something the great Dane Larsen once mentioned that some wins net more than 1pt and can effect future games when an opponent seeks revenge after a bitter loss.

Magnus agreeing that Firouzjawill be around for a long time tries a bit of counselling by saying mistakes are all part of the learning process adding:

"Certainly I had many experiences like this. I lost two rook endings against Levon for absolutely no reason. It's part of the growing process. " (OOPS!)

And in the next round this threads game happened.

I think Magnus is talking about these two other games v Aronain Carlsen vs Aronian, 2009 and Aronian vs Carlsen, 2006

I may (stress may) have avoided the Carlsen blunder in this game.


click for larger view

49.Rxf6? when 49.h5 draws (apparently) because my endgame play is based on a collection of rules of thumb, King squares and two move trick patterns.

'Passed pawns must be pushed.' (Reinfeld.)

That of course that is not saying I'd not blunder after move 49, as always I approach these critical positions on what would I have done. Push the passer, the f6 pawn cannot run away.

I like Carlsen's comment about after the OTB lay off he is getting used to the 'wooden screen' wish I had thought of that one.

***

Oct-22-20  asiduodiego: <Sally Simpson> <"Certainly I had many experiences like this. I lost two rook endings against Levon for absolutely no reason. It's part of the growing process. " (OOPS!)>

I recall Bobby Fischer said once: "In chess sometimes we give lessons, sometimes we receive lessons".

I can't blame Magnus too much for the mistake which lead to Levon's victory. He was short on time, and (if I had to guess), I think he was trying to create a better support for his h-pawn, thinking that he had to commit the King and the Rook to defend against Levon's pawn rush.

Perhaps he even thought he was safe, because Black can't cover the check with the rook, because the White King is in the square of the pawn... in move 50. But after Levon plays 50... b3, the whole situation changes. Now the White King is outside of the square of the pawn.

Anyway. Congratulations to Levon. He's a great player, played a very entertaining and sharp game and he managed to punish Magnus for his inaccuracies.

Oct-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Messiah: Admins R mad, they deleted my insightful analysis. Sad!
Oct-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Hi Messiah,

I saw your post, I think it was pulled because it contained a sweary word.

Hi asiduodiego,

All I can offer regarding what Magnus missed is 'where would I have slipped on' (perm any move from the 50 played)

But here, Black to play.


click for larger view

Although I would not have taken on f6, That is an honest claim, the passed pawns must be pushed R.O.T. is deeply ingrained.

I can see me in the heat of the battle not foreseeing a few moves previously that Black can and indeed did play 52....Ra7 (OOPS!).

Maybe that is what Carlsen missed when he took on f6.

***

Oct-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  perfidious: Poor, poor <messiah> finally gets schooled in the home truth that he cannot relentlessly slag his favourite player of all time.

Oh, well: the dear boy had to grow up a little one day.

Oct-22-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  AylerKupp: <<perfidious> Oh, well: the dear boy had to grow up a little one day.>

Given his subsequent post, calling the admins mad, I think that you presume too much. Apparently he thinks that the <chessgames.com> posting guidelines apply to everyone else, but not to him. So he's just as childish as ever, maybe even more so. But, if he doesn't mind everyone laughing at him, why should we care?

Oct-22-20  Ulhumbrus: 11 h4 starts an attack. Is it justified? Suppose we try an evaluation.

White is ahead in development, as his queen is developed while Black's isn't. Black has disturbed his king side pawns. If other things are equal and White can make both of these things count, White has an advantage that is more than slight.

This suggests that White is advised to try to attack but that his aim should be proportionate to his advantage.

One alternative is 11 Bh6 Bf8 12 Bxf8 Kxf8 13 0-0 Kg7 14 Rae1 with the idea of e4 although Black may try ...c5 to upset the plan eg 14...Nb6 15 Nd2 c5

11...a5 looks like a brilliant strategical idea on the part of Aronian, which is perhaps typical for Aronian. White has gained time towards a king side attack so Aronians gains time towards a counter-attack on the queen side. Very likely both players understand what black has done and why.

So with 12 Kf1 Carlsen responds to Aronian's counter attack by trying to avoid placing his king on the queen side but trying still to play for a king side attack. Perhaps this is too optimistic, but if so it is up to Aronian to find a good choice in reply.

With 13 a3 White disturbs his queen side pawns but stops the further pawn advance ...a3. For his part with 14...h5 does the same thing on the king side. He disturbs his king side pawns but stops the further pawn advance h5. Once again we can assume that both players understand the duel that they are fighting.

After 15...0-0 Black's rooks are connected but White's rooks are not and his king's rook is out of play. This suggests that by now Black has a considerable advantage and Aronian goes on to win.

This suggests that Aronian's answer to Carlsen's relinquishment of his right to castle was to make strategical choices that were analogous to Carlsen's but with the favourable difference that Aronian's rooks were connected while Carlsen's king's rook was out of play and would cost time to bring into play.

Oct-23-20  Ulhumbrus: 11 h4 starts an attack. Is it justified? Suppose we try an evaluation.

White is ahead in development, as his queen is developed while Black's isn't. Black has disturbed his king side pawns. If other things are equal and White can make both of these things count, White has an advantage that is more than slight.

This suggests that White is advised to try to attack but that his aim should be proportionate to his advantage.

One alternative is 11 Bh6 Bf8 12 Bxf8 Kxf8 13 0-0 Kg7 14 Rae1 with the idea of e4 although Black may try ...c5 to upset the plan eg 14...Nb6 15 Nd2 c5

11...a5 looks like a brilliant strategical idea on the part of Aronian, which is perhaps typical for Aronian. White has gained time towards a king side attack so Aronians gains time towards a counter-attack on the queen side. Very likely both players understand what black has done and why.

So with 12 Kf1 Carlsen responds to Aronian's counter attack by trying to avoid placing his king on the queen side but trying still to play for a king side attack. Perhaps this is too optimistic, but if so it is up to Aronian to find a good choice in reply.

With 13 a3 White disturbs his queen side pawns but stops the further pawn advance ...a3. For his part with 14...h5 Aronian does the same thing on the king side. He disturbs his king side pawns but stops the further pawn advance h5. Once again we can assume that both players understand the duel that they are fighting.

After 15...0-0 Black's rooks are connected but White's rooks are not and his king's rook is out of play. This suggests that by now Black has a considerable advantage and Aronian goes on to win.

This suggests that Aronian's answer to Carlsen's relinquishment of his right to castle was to make strategical choices that were analogous to Carlsen's but with the favourable difference that Aronian's rooks were connected while Carlsen's king's rook was out of play and would cost time to bring into play.

Oct-23-20  SChesshevsky: < Ulhumbrus: 11 h4 starts an attack. Is it justified? Suppose we try an evaluation. White is ahead in development, as his queen is developed while Black's isn't....>

Good question. Turns out not to be much of an attack. Seems mainly due to the weakness on b2. A weakness probably not helped by the Bd3...Bxd3, Qxd3 sequence. That manuever is usually at minimum OK for black, and maybe even better, as the white queen on d3 isn't that well placed. Think maybe more justified for white in a line like the classical Caro-Kann but worse in a QGD. At least in my experience

<... So with 12 Kf1 Carlsen responds to Aronian's counter attack by trying to avoid placing his king on the queen side but trying still to play for a king side attack. Perhaps this is too optimistic, but if so it is up to Aronian to find a good choice in reply...>

Think "too optimistic" is exactly the right description. If the idea was to go with Kf1, g3, Kg2 then start action, that has got to take way too much time. Believing a player of Aronian's caliber won't take advantage would seem overly hopeful.

But maybe Carlsen's plan all along was the King's rook lift. A really nice idea but seems to require an active queen to keep the rook from looking just ugly. All the tempi needed by the queen and that check on f1 had to help black. Carlsen put up a great defense though. Shame he didn't save it in the end.

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