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alexmagnus
Member since Dec-06-04 · Last seen Jun-11-21
Hobby player (rated 1634).

If you feel misunderstood, feel free to say it.

My favourite players are: Magnus Carlsen, Kateryna Lagno and Hanna-Marie Klek!

The domination list, based on the peak rating distance to the #10 player (official lists only, distance 50+ needed to "qualify"):

Kasparov 175 Jan 90
Fischer 160 Jul 72
Karpov 130 Jan 89
Carlsen 123 Mar 14
Kramnik 110 Jan 98
Tal 105 Jan 80
Ivanchuk 105 Jul 91
Anand 105 Jul 98
Korchnoi 95 Jan 80
Topalov 84 Jul 06
Caruana 80 Oct 14
Aronian 72 Mar 14
Spassky 70 Jan 71
Shirov 65 Jul 94
Gelfand 60 Jan 91
Kamsky 60 Jan 96 Jul 96
Morozevich 57 Jul 99
Portisch 55 Jan 80
Jussupow 55 Jul 86
Timman 55 Jan 90
So 53 Feb 17
Adams 52 Oct 00
Mamedyarov 52 Nov 18 Dec 18
Ding 51 Nov 18
Bareev 50 Jul 91
Vachier-Lagrave 50 Aug 16

#1 record distances to #2 (no qualification hurdle):

Fischer 125 (1972)
Kasparov 82 (January 2000)
Carlsen 74 (October 2013)
Karpov 65 (January 1982)
Topalov 34 (July 2006, October 2006)
Anand 23 (July 2007)

Women's "domination list" since July 2000:

J. Polgar 248 (April 2007)
Hou 160 (December 2015, February 2019)
Humpy 114 (October 2007)
S. Polgar 96 (January 2005)
Xie 92 (January 2005)
Ju 92 (August 2019)
Goryachkina 83 (April 2021, May 2021)
A. Muzychuk 82 (August 2012)
Stefanova 76 (January 2003)
Galliamova 65 (January 2001)
Zhao 64 (September 2013)
Kosteniuk 58 (July 2006)
Lagno 58 (February 2019)
Chiburdanidze 57 (October 2000)
Cramling 56 (April 2007)
T. Kosintseva 56 (November 2010)
Zhu 52 (April 2007)
M. Muzychuk 52 (June 2019)
N. Kosintseva 51 (November 2010)

Earliest Soviet championship with living players: USSR Championship (1948) (Averbakh)

Earliest Interzonal with living players: Stockholm Interzonal (1952) (Averbakh, Matanovic)

Earliest Candidates with living players: Zurich Candidates (1953) (Averbakh)

Earliest WC match with living players: Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1966) (Spassky)

Earliest WC match with living winner: Petrosian - Spassky World Championship Match (1969) (Spassky)

Earliest WC match with both players living: Karpov - Kasparov World Championship Match (1984/85)

>> Click here to see alexmagnus's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   alexmagnus has kibitzed 11248 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Jun-11-21 GCT Bucharest Classic (2021) (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <.Wesley is already a world champion. How quick people forget when he run over Magnus flat like pancake on 960 chess world championship...in his own turf. Haha!!> Reminder of how that event went: So got trounced by Naka Naka got trounced by Caruana Caruana got trounced
 
   Jun-03-21 World Championship Candidates (2020/21) (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <Not sure how you reach that conclusion.> Look whom Fischer, Karpov, and early Kasparov faced on their race to the world title. And at the Candidates in the Karpov era (1981, one of only two Candidates tournaments where all players are older than the reigning world ...
 
   Jun-03-21 alexmagnus chessforum (replies)
 
alexmagnus: I will still keep including all US players into my "former British Empire" lists :). The US was founded in a fight for independence from Britain, so if we just look at a country (and not the state or even city level), it makes perfect sense to include the US (unlike, for example,
 
   Jun-02-21 Hans-Joachim Federer (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <Imagine you are an obviously supertalented tennis player, one in a billion. But your public speaking skills are so low that no amount of psychological training can repair it.> Which is, by the way, quite close to Osaka's situation. Her public <speaking skills> are ...
 
   May-06-21 beatgiant chessforum (replies)
 
alexmagnus: The sequence completely repeating the Jewish calendar pattern would btw be w,w,b,w,w,b,w,b,w,w,b,w,w,b,w,w,b,w,b
 
   Apr-28-21 Sokrates chessforum (replies)
 
alexmagnus: <<alexmagnus>, please read the positives in what I say here.> I do, just, what should I respond to things I agree with other than that I agree with them? I might add some information if I know more, but that is it. Just saying "ditto" is of not much value to me. So ...
 
   Apr-27-21 Ian Nepomniachtchi (replies)
 
alexmagnus: < Is Nepomniachtchi the first challenger in history with a щ in his name?> I think so. You can skip non-Russian players when searching anyway, as I'm not aware of any loanword in Russian spelled with a щ.
 
   Apr-15-21 AylerKupp chessforum (replies)
 
...
 
   Mar-04-21 Yuri L Averbakh
 
alexmagnus: He is actually the oldest GM ever now (since February 12, when he surpassed Lilienthal's lifespan).
 
   Feb-22-21 Hanna-Marie Klek
 
alexmagnus: Magnus' team was far too weak. Along with the world champion himself, it consisted of a 2000 player, a 1500 player and a 1000 player. The last board only got 1/6. So that Carlsen's own 5.5/6 (draw against Korobov, the only GM he played) was by far not enough to pull the team. ...
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 49 OF 49 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Now for a bit of a shake-up. Instead of my usual "top 10 post-Communist" list, I am listing the top player from each and every "post-Communist" country.

Definitions: A "post-Communist" country is a country (other than former USSR or China) that had a government in power whose behavior in political and economic matters was inspired by the USSR over a period of years. Yes, a little vague, but now I'm showing my complete list.

In case of split countries that reunited (Germany, Vietnam, Yemen), we determine based on the reunification outcome (Germany and Yemen: not "post-Communist," Vietnam: "post-Communist"). In case of formerly unified countries that split apart (Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, Ethiopia), we list all of the resulting countries. Kosovo* is shown with asterisk as per FIDE's list.

The countries are listed in order of top rated player.

1. Hungary: Rapport 2763
2. Bulgaria: Topalov 2735
3. Poland: Duda 2729
4. Vietnam: Le, 2709
5. Czech Rep: Navara 2697
6. Romania: Lupulescu 2656
7. Croatia: Saric 2645
8. Slovenia: Lenic 2627
9. Serbia: Indjic 2607
10. N. Macedonia: Georgiev 2589
11. Bosnia: Predojevic 2586
12. Cuba: Albornoz Cabrera 2573
13. Slovakia: Markos 2565
14. Mongolia: Batchuluun 2536
15. Albania: Dervishi 2527
16. Montenegro: Djukic 2510
17. Kosovo*: Saraci 2424
18. Angola: Silva 2296
19. Nicaragua: Ampie 2290
20. Mozambique: Paiva 2230
21. Afghanistan: Kanz 1982
22. Eritrea: Kibrom Weldegebriel Beraki 1820
23. Somalia: Islam Sh. Nour 1812
24. Laos: Senglek 1253
25. Cambodia: no active player
26. Ethiopia: no rated player
27-29. Benin: non-FIDE member
27-29. N. Korea: non-FIDE member
27-29. Rep. Congo (Brazzaville): non-FIDE member

It turns out that I still don't need to decide whether Grenada is "post-Communist," because they have no rated player!

As usual, I welcome any corrections. In particular, did I miss any country?

May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: My purpose in making the list above is to shed some light on the question of how much it makes sense to track "post-Communist" countries as a chess phenomenon. What is the "post-Communist" effect and how important is it?

Several of the countries near the top of the list already had strong chess cultures before "Communism": parts of the former Austria-Hungary (e.g. Hungary, Czech Rep.), Poland, parts of the former Yugoslavia, and Cuba.

There are also some countries like Bulgaria and Romania for which their top players today look noticeably higher ranked than pre-"Communism." In particular, Vietnam and Mongolia have higher rankings than their non-"post-Communist" neighbors such as South Korea or Japan.

But in the rest of the developing countries, one hardly sees any effect. For example, Silva, the top post-Communist player of Africa, is only 48th ranked on a list of African players. And the last few countries on the list have hardly any official chess activity at all.

The case of Cuba is also noteworthy. The country could have been higher ranked if it weren't for a number of recent defections to the US, made possible by Cold War-era US rules to support such defections.

May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: My overall conclusion is that the "post-Communist" effect is not huge. Vietnam is surprisingly strong, but Cuba has lots of defectors, and most of the other countries seem largely unaffected.

For this month at least, I will not publish a top 10 for this group, and my "rest of world" list will include some countries that previously were on the post-Communist list and we'll see how that goes.

May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Rest of world.

Eligibility: player who is not from a country that is EU, former USSR, former British Empire, Asia, Latin America, Middle East, Nordic/Baltic, or a nuclear weapon state.

1. Firouzja 2759
2-3. Indjic 2607
2-3. Milov 2607
4. Ivanisevic 2606
5. Markus 2600
6. Georgiev 2589
7. Predojevic 2586
8-9. Kadric 2584
8-9. Studer 2584
10. Ivic 2581

Just as expected, the list filled up with players from parts of the former Yugoslavia that aren't yet in the EU, besides the usual Firouzja and a few Swiss players. It's a stronger list, but gives less feeling of representing "the rest of the world."

May-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Going forward, probably I should revive the idea of a Balkans list. Then rest of world will look same as before, unless the likes of Angola and Mozambique majorly raise their games.

So, here goes.

Balkans. Eligibility: player from any part of the former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Albania or Greece.

1. Topalov 2735
2. Cheparinov 2667
3. Saric 2645
4. Lenic 2627
5. Papaioannou 2623
6. Mastrovasilis 2609
7-8. Bosiocic 2607
7-8. Indjic 2607
9. Ivanisevic 2606
10. Banikas 2602

And another "rest of world" list reflecting also "not from Balkans":

1. Firouzja 2759
2. Milov 2607
3. Studer 2584
4. Pelletier 2581
5. Bogner 2577
6. Hamdouchi 2561
7. Georgiadis 2553
8-9. Fontaine 2550
8-9. Megaranto 2550
10. Bellahcene 2508
11. Priasmoro 2502
12. Arab 2487

May-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
FYI, I posted a question for you in my forum (can re-post it here if you prefer).
May-06-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: <beatgiant> answered there, thank you for paying attention to it, found my mistake.
May-07-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: For this month's novelty list, in honor of the resumed world title cycle, I present every Carlsen and every Nepomniachtchi-like. Eligibility: active player with surname 'Carlsen' or with surname close (as judged by me) to 'Nepomniachtchi.'

1. Carlsen, M. 2847
2. Nepomniachtchi 2792
3. Nepomniachi 2253
4. Carlsen, Christian H. 2088
5. Carlsen, H. 2063
6. Nepomiachti 1955
7. Carlsen, E. 1874
8. Nepomnyaschaya 1741
9. Carlsen, R. 1553
10. Carlsen, Christian 1377
11. Nepomniashchii 1270

There are enough of them to create 4-player teams (the Carlsens get 2 alternates and the Nepos get 1).

May-07-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Interesting, the two four-player teams would be quite evenly matched.

Magnus (2847) - Ian (2792)
Christian (2088) - Alexander (2253)
Henrik (2063) - Alexandre (1955)
Erik (1874) - Mariya (1741)

That's an advantage of 18 points for Team Carlsen on the average rating, and no-one of the four pairings looks like a total mismatch.

May-07-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  technical draw: Thank you <alexmagnus> and <beatgiant> for those interesting statistics. I love statistics but the math you guys use is above my pay grade. I might not comment but I am visiting.
May-31-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: June 2021

Latin America:
1. Cori 2652
2-3. Granda Zuniga 2630
2-3. Pichot 2630
4. Mareco 2629
5. Delgado Ramirez 2622
6. Martinez Alcantara 2620
7. Henriquez Villagra 2606
8-9. Bachmann 2599
8-9. Flores 2599
10. Leitao 2592

Middle East:
1. Amin 2703
2. Maghsoodloo 2698
3. Salem 2682
4. Gelfand 2675
5. Ipatov 2644
6. Sutovsky 2634
7. Yilmaz 2630
8. Adly 2625
9-10. Idani 2614
9-10. Rodshtein 2614

May-31-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Nordic/Baltic:
1. Carlsen 2847
2. Grandelius 2670
3. Kovalenko 2643
4. Tari 2639
5-6. Christiansen 2618
5-6. Nielsen 2618
7. Hammer 2608
8. Gretarsson 2603
9. Hansen 2596
10. Hellers 2592

Balkans:
1. Topalov 2735
2. Cheparinov 2667
3. Saric 2645
4. Lenic 2627
5. Papaioannou 2623
6. Bosiocic 2610
7. Mastrovasilis 2609
8. Indjic 2607
9. Ivanisevic 2606
10. Banikas 2602

May-31-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Rest of World:
1. Firouzja 2759
2. Milov 2607
3-5. Bogner 2581
3-5. Pelletier 2581
3-5. Studer 2581
6. Hamdouchi 2561
7. Georgiadis 2553
8-9. Fontaine 2550
8-9. Megaranto 2550
10. Priasmoro 2502
11. Bellahcene 2499
12. Arab 2487

Old Guard:
1. Anand 2753
2. Topalov 2735
3. Adams 2716
4. Svidler 2714
5. Sadler 2694
6. Almasi 2687
7. Ivanchuk 2678
8. Gelfand 2675
9. Malakhov 2666
10. Leko 2664

Jun-01-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: My usual ones too...

European Union:

1. Giri 2780
2. Rapport 2763
3. Vachier-Lagrave 2760
4. Topalov 2735
5. Duda 2729
6. Vallejo 2710
7. Van Foreest 2701
8. Navara 2697
9-10. Wojtaszek 2687
9-10. Almasi 2687

Former Soviet Union:

1. Nepomniachtchi 2792
2. Aronian 2781
3. Grischuk 2776
4. Mamedyarov 2770
5. Radjabov 2765
6. Karjakin 2757
7-8. Andreikin 2724
7-8. Vitiugov 2724
9. Esipenko 2716
10-11. Dubov 2714
10-11. Svidler 2714

Former British Empire:

1. Caruana 2820
2. So 2770
3. Dominguez 2758
4. Anand 2753
5. Nakamura 2736
6. Harikrishna 2730
7. Vidit 2726
8. Adams 2716
9. Xiong 2709
10. Amin 2703

Asia:

1. Ding 2799
2. Anand 2753
3. Wang 2744
4. Harikrishna 2730
5. Vidit 2726
6. Wei 2725
7. Le 2709
8-9. Yu 2705
8-9. Bu 2705
10. Maghsoodloo 2698

Born later than the world champion:

1. Caruana 2820
2. Ding 2799
3. Giri 2780
4. So 2770
5. Rapport 2763
6. Firouzja 2759
7. Duda 2729
8. Vidit 2726
9. Wei 2725
10. Esipenko 2716

Nuclear powers:

1. Caruana 2820
2. Ding 2799
3. Nepomniachtchi 2792
4. Grischuk 2776
5. So 2770
6. Vachier-Lagrave 2760
7. Dominguez 2758
8. Karjakin 2757
9. Anand 2753
10. Wang 2744

Jun-01-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: One of my recent game of the day puns based on Prokofiev was well received. Inspired by that, I decided to take classical composers as the theme for this month's novelty list.

Eligibility: I skimmed the index of a history of western classical music for the name list. I limited it to exact surname matches and active players on the FIDE list. With that methodology, here are all I found.

1. Wagner 2572
2. Berg 2532
3. Bellini 2437
4. Weber 2365
5. Schubert 2319
6. Puccini 2313
7. Bach 2277
8. Dvorak 2223
9. Strauss 2185
10. Prokofiev 2175
11. Rossini 2114
12. Schumann 1966
13. Paganini 1962
14. Khachaturian 1884
15. Bernstein 1874
16. Bartok 1807
17. Mahler 1798
18. Balakirev 1771
19. Smetana 1637
20. Ravel 1372
21. Stravinski 1133
22. Verdi 1057

I also found the following notable inactive players.

Debussy 1948
Chopin 1573

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Talking about namesakes, let's see some others...

Soviet/Russian leaders since 1917 (for Lenin and Stalin I searched both the pseudonyms and their true names):

1. Kruschiov 2382
2. Eltsin 2258
3. Chernenko 1870
4. Ulyanov 1432 (Lenin 1310)
5. Gorbachev 1355
6. Putin 1347

German chancellors (since 1871)

1. Bauer 2639
2. Schroeder 2568
3. Luther 2528
4. Schmidt 2400
5. Mueller 2387
6. von Buelow 2361
7. Brandt 2226 (Frahm 1654)
8. Merkel 2148
9. Ebert 2125
10. Michaelis 2117
11. Marx 2009
12. Wirth 1968
13. Bruening 1852
14. Hertling 1751
15. Kohl 1678
16. von Bismarck 1397

Of the candidates for the next election, their best rated namesakes are Scholz (2366) and Laschet (2141). No Baerbock.

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
I assume you didn't include Medvedev (2077) and Malenkov (2004) among the Soviet/Russian leaders due to interpretation of history and questions about their actual power? (I was about to call out Chernenko too, but then noticed you actually did include him.)

Of course, a similar question could apply to prime ministers if we extend back into pre-Soviet times, but there are:

Stuermer 2205
Witte 2049
Lvov 2007
Goremykin 1826
Golitsyn 1802

For the dynasties, I found:
Romanov 2599
Rurik 1952

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: Medvedev, I simply forgot. His rule was so unremarkable that in my (and I guess not only my) mind it feels like Russia has been ruled by Putin ever since Yeltsin's resignation.

Didn't find a Malenkov - but I did search (guess spelled him wrongly?)

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <alexmagnus>
Oh, I just noticed that I forgot to filter for active players, and Yuriy Malenkov has been inactive since 2012.
Jun-02-21  nok: <Former British Empire: ...9. Xiong>

Xiong is from Texas. That would be Spanish empire.

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: <nok>
The FIDE lists only give the countries. We can't really expect <alexmagnus> to research for each Indian chessplayer whether that player's place of residence was in pre-independence times ruled by the British, the Portuguese or the French, for example. Besides, players can move from one state to another at any time.

As to the merits, I'd argue that, while Texas has a mixture of post-British and post-Spanish attributes, the post-British ones (language, culture, system of laws and government, etc.) are still great enough to support Xiong's membership on that list.

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: To <nok>'s point, top US players whose place of residence was never ruled by the British, with the state and former empire (state based on US federation listing):

1. Caruana (NV, Spanish)
2. So 2770 (MN*, French)
3. Dominguez Perez 2758 (MO, French)
4. Xiong 2709 (TX, Spanish)
5. Shankland 2691 (CA, Spanish)
6. Robson 2673 (MO, French)
7-8. Onischuk 2649 (TX, Spanish)
7-8. Swiercz 2649 (MO, French)
9. Bruzon Batista 2639 (MO, French)
10. Zherebukh 2620 (MO, French)

*The state was split but I think So lives on the former French side.

Jun-02-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: Among the top Indian players, Anand and Harikrishna reside outside India (further showing the futility of a state-based criterion), but all of them as far as I can tell are from former British ruled parts of the country.
Jun-03-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  alexmagnus: I will still keep including all US players into my "former British Empire" lists :). The US was founded in a fight for independence from Britain, so if we just look at a country (and not the state or even city level), it makes perfect sense to include the US (unlike, for example, China: Hongkong is a separate federation anyway, and Weihai is too insignifcant to consider China a former British colony :D. And even in Hongkong federation ever gets integrated into the Chinese federation, it is still too little).

Next namesake list: US presidents

1. Adams 2716
2. Jackson 2386
3. Taylor 2347
4. Grant 2157
5. Johnson 2131
6. Harrison 2103
7. Wilson 2097
8. Carter 2096
9. Buchanan 2081
10. Kennedy 2041
11. Harding 2003
12. Jefferson 1989
13. Arthur 1928
14. Truman 1913
15. Ford 1795
16. Madison 1700
17. Clinton 1695
18. Reagan 1688
19. Bush 1687
20. Garfield 1654
21. Hoover 1537
22. Washington 1376

Jun-04-21
Premium Chessgames Member
  beatgiant: For completeness, here are the notable Indian players I found from places that were never British-ruled (states based on wikipedia's list of Indian chess players).

I can't guarantee the accuracy or completeness, but it's good enough to be able to conclude that it doesn't affect <alexmagnus>'s Former British Empire list. I can also confirm that state-level research is indeed as much work as expected ;-)

1. Mendonca 2549 (Goa, Portuguese)
2. Anurag 2499 (Goa, Portuguese)
3. Kulkarni Bhakti 2391 (Goa, Portuguese)
4. Audi Ameya 2378 (Goa, Portuguese)
5. Rohan 2355 (Goa, Portuguese)
5. Koshi 2217 (Puducherri, French)
6. Ivana Maria* 2139 (Goa, Portuguese)

*inactive

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