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Harry Nelson Pillsbury
Pillsbury 
 
Number of games in database: 566
Years covered: 1890 to 1905

Overall record: +213 -91 =103 (65.0%)*
   * Overall winning percentage = (wins+draws/2) / total games in the database. 159 exhibition games, blitz/rapid, odds games, etc. are excluded from this statistic.

MOST PLAYED OPENINGS
With the White pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (61) 
    C67 C80 C78 C62 C71
 Orthodox Defense (50) 
    D60 D50 D63 D55 D51
 French Defense (38) 
    C14 C13 C11 C12 C10
 Queen's Gambit Declined (24) 
    D31 D37 D06 D30
 Queen's Pawn Game (23) 
    D00 D02 D05 A40 D04
 French (23) 
    C13 C11 C10 C12 C00
With the Black pieces:
 Ruy Lopez (56) 
    C67 C65 C60 C79 C78
 Petrov (22) 
    C42 C43
 Queen's Pawn Game (14) 
    D00 D02 D04 A41
 Sicilian (13) 
    B73 B32 B30 B24 B56
 Giuoco Piano (11) 
    C50 C53
 Four Knights (11) 
    C49 C48
Repertoire Explorer

NOTABLE GAMES: [what is this?]
   Pillsbury vs Lasker, 1896 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Gunsberg, 1895 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Tarrasch, 1895 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Lasker, 1904 1-0
   Pillsbury vs G Marco, 1900 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Fernandez, 1900 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Maroczy, 1900 1-0
   Pillsbury vs Winawer, 1896 1-0
   Pillsbury vs NN, 1899 1-0
   Lasker vs Pillsbury, 1895 0-1

NOTABLE TOURNAMENTS: [what is this?]
   1st City Chess Club Tournament (1893)
   Pillsbury - Showalter US Championship (1897)
   Pillsbury - Showalter US Championship (1898)
   Hastings (1895)
   Buffalo (1901)
   Munich (1900)
   Vienna (1898)
   Monte Carlo (1902)
   Paris (1900)
   13th DSB Kongress (Hanover) (1902)
   Nuremberg (1896)
   Budapest (1896)
   London (1899)
   Monte Carlo (1903)
   Vienna (1903)

GAME COLLECTIONS: [what is this?]
   pillsbury's best games of chess by bengalcat47
   Pillsbury vs World Champions Decisive Games by visayanbraindoctor
   Ideas by LaBourdonnaisdeux
   N O P Players by fredthebear
   HNP: "A Genuis Ahead of His Time" by chocobonbon
   Vienna 1898 by suenteus po 147
   Vienna 1898 by JoseTigranTalFischer
   Pillsbury, the Extraordinary by StuporMundi
   Noteworthy Games by Southernrun
   Noteworthy Games by BAJones
   London 1899 by suenteus po 147
   Pillsbury winning on f5. by nikolaas
   London 1899 by JoseTigranTalFischer
   Monte Carlo 1903 by suenteus po 147

GAMES ANNOTATED BY PILLSBURY: [what is this?]
   Schlechter vs Lasker, 1895
   Janowski vs Steinitz, 1895
   Tarrasch vs Chigorin, 1895
   Burn vs Lasker, 1895
   Schiffers vs Chigorin, 1895
   >> 18 GAMES ANNOTATED BY PILLSBURY


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HARRY NELSON PILLSBURY
(born Dec-05-1872, died Jun-17-1906, 33 years old) United States of America

[what is this?]
Harry Nelson Pillsbury was born in Somerville, Massachusetts, the Boston Chess Club being not far to the south of town. He learned to play chess at the age of sixteen, when he was encouraged by family to study chess as a distraction after his mother died. Within four years Pillsbury had improved to the point of winning a three-game match from Wilhelm Steinitz in 1892 by the score of 2-1 at the odds of pawn and move. He also scored one of two wins against Steinitz in the World Champion's 20-board simultaneous exhibition. In 1893, he won a close match against John Finan Barry (+5 -4 =1) that earned him entry into his first international tournament in New York as Boston's representative. Although the congress fell through, most likely due to problems in the financial world, the so-called “Impromptu” 1893 tournament was organized in its place. Playing in his first tournament with European masters, Pillsbury barely managed a plus score and finished seventh. Pillsbury returned to New York a few months later and finished clear first in the 1893 New York Masters (sometimes called the “Manhattan Cafe”) tournament ahead of a number of American masters. Pillsbury then moved to New York and began working for the Eden Musee as the operator of Ajeeb (Automaton), a chess- and checkers-playing automaton. He held this job with periodic leaves of absence until 1898 when he moved to Philadelphia and married. In 1894, Pillsbury finished second to Jackson Whipps Showalter in a small tournament in Buffalo (Staats-Zeitung Cup) and had a poor result of =5th in a master's tournament in New York. Nevertheless, he still made a sufficiently good impression for the Brooklyn Chess Club to sponsor his trip to the 1895 chess congress in Hastings.

At Hastings, Pillsbury stunned the chess world by taking clear first in perhaps the greatest tournament of the 19th Century, ahead of a field that included Mikhail Chigorin, Emanuel Lasker, Siegbert Tarrasch, Wilhelm Steinitz, Joseph Henry Blackburne, Amos Burn, Richard Teichmann and others. On the basis of this result, Pillsbury was invited to an elite four-player tournament in St. Petersburg, with Lasker, Steinitz, and Chigorin. Pillsbury was leading by a full game halfway through the tournament (+5 -1 =3), but fell ill during the second half, with catastrophic results (+0 -6 =3). Had Pillsbury managed to win or finish a close second he might well have secured the world championship match that eluded him. Nevertheless, this was the start of a successful tournament career that included 1st at Buffalo 1901, =1st at Vienna 1898 and Munich 1900, 2nd at Paris 1900, Monte Carlo 1902, and Hanover 1902, =2nd at London 1899, 3rd at St. Petersburg 1895-6, Budapest 1896, and Monte Carlo 1903, =3rd at Nuremberg 1896, and 4th at the Vienna Gambit tournament 1903. Pillsbury only seriously faltered at the very end, finishing =8th with a minus score at Cambridge Springs 1904, in his last tournament.

Pillsbury negotiated the final terms of the first Anglo-American cable match with Sir George Newnes, president of the London Chess Club. Sir George donated the Newnes Cup, held by the winning team each year until the next match. Pillsbury played on the first board for the US team in the first eight cable matches (+1 -2 =5). Pillsbury also helped prepare the US House of Representatives team for their 1897 cable match against the House of Commons.

Pillsbury was considered the strongest player in the US. He played two matches for the US championship against Showalter, winning both of the Pillsbury - Showalter (1897) (+10-8=3) and Pillsbury - Showalter (1898) (+7-3=2) matches. However Pillsbury was not especially eager to be named US champion: “I was not seeking the match, and even if I should win I shall leave Showalter in possession of the title; I am not in search of any title but one.” The “one” title was, of course, World Champion. Pillsbury wrote to New York following his success at Hastings that there had been some talk of arranging a title match with Lasker, but, as with so many proposed world championship matches over the years, nothing came of it. Pillsbury's inability to obtain a title match against Lasker was most likely due to Pillsbury's failure to secure enough financial backing to induce Lakser to agree to a match.

Pillsbury was accomplished at blindfold chess and often playing mutiple games blindfolded in his exhibitions. He set an early world record for number of simultaneous blindfold games, playing 20 games at Philadelphia in 1900. He was also a skilled checkers player, and would sometimes include checkers and whist games in his exhibitions. Pillsbury's exhibitions were quite impressive for the day. Jose Raul Capablanca wrote: “The effect of Pillsbury's displays was immediate. They electrified me, and with the consent of my parents I began to visit the Havana Chess Club.”

Pillsbury played a number of consultation games over the years. Such games were sometimes played on off days of tournaments between players with no adjourned games. Pillsbury played with or against masters such as Henry Edward Bird, Blackburne, Chigorin, David Janowski, Lasker, William Ewart Napier, Georg Marco, Frank James Marshall, Carl Schlechter, Showalter, Tarrasch, Teichmann, and others.

While there is general agreement that Pillsbury died of syphilis, it is unknown when he contracted the disease. Syphilis shows great variability in its time course across patients and can easily mimic symptoms of other diseases, so a definitive answer is unlikely. Pillsbury was ill during the second half of the St. Petersburg tournament, which was attributed to influenza at the time. He was also quite ill during the Nuremberg tournament, and, of course, during Cambridge Springs. He suffered two strokes during the last year and a half of his life.

Pillsbury wrote no chess books. He wrote occasional newspaper reports on tournaments and matches and wrote a column for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Although there are few known correspondence games played by Pillsbury, one of the early correspondence chess organizations in the US was named in his honor (Pillsbury National Correspondence Chess Association).

Wikipedia article: Harry Nelson Pillsbury


 page 1 of 23; games 1-25 of 567  PGN Download
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. Pillsbury vs F Young 1-0201890Offhand gameA02 Bird's Opening
2. Pillsbury vs Burille  ½-½701891Odds Match vs. Burille, -92000 Chess variants
3. Pillsbury vs Burille 1-0351891Odds Match vs. Burille, -92000 Chess variants
4. Pillsbury vs Burille 0-1451891Odds Match vs. Burille, -92000 Chess variants
5. Pillsbury vs Burille  1-0291891Odds Match vs. Burille, -92000 Chess variants
6. Pillsbury vs Burille 1-0531891Odds Match vs. Burille, -92000 Chess variants
7. Steinitz vs Pillsbury 1-0371892BostonC51 Evans Gambit
8. Pillsbury vs Steinitz 1-0661892Odds match (pawn and move)000 Chess variants
9. Pillsbury vs Steinitz 0-1361892Odds match (pawn and move)000 Chess variants
10. Pillsbury vs Steinitz 1-0311892Odds match (pawn and move)000 Chess variants
11. Steinitz vs Pillsbury 0-1301892Simul, 20bC30 King's Gambit Declined
12. Pillsbury vs W P Shipley 0-1101893PhiladelphiaA07 King's Indian Attack
13. Pillsbury vs J W Young 0-1491893SimulC14 French, Classical
14. F Young vs Pillsbury 1-0161893BostonC62 Ruy Lopez, Old Steinitz Defense
15. Pillsbury vs K A Walbrodt ½-½641893Pillsbury -- Walbrodt Informal MatchA07 King's Indian Attack
16. Pillsbury vs K A Walbrodt 1-0271893Pillsbury -- Walbrodt Informal MatchC25 Vienna
17. K A Walbrodt vs Pillsbury 0-1371893Pillsbury -- Walbrodt Informal MatchC30 King's Gambit Declined
18. Pillsbury vs Gossip 1-0471893New YorkA07 King's Indian Attack
19. J M Hanham vs Pillsbury  1-0521893New YorkC55 Two Knights Defense
20. Pillsbury vs J S Ryan 1-0541893New YorkA40 Queen's Pawn Game
21. E Delmar vs Pillsbury 1-0251893New YorkC46 Three Knights
22. Pillsbury vs Louis Schmidt 1-0411893New YorkD04 Queen's Pawn Game
23. E N Olly vs Pillsbury 0-1451893New YorkA01 Nimzovich-Larsen Attack
24. Pillsbury vs F J Lee 0-1601893New YorkB01 Scandinavian
25. Lasker vs Pillsbury 1-0551893New YorkC60 Ruy Lopez
 page 1 of 23; games 1-25 of 567  PGN Download
  REFINE SEARCH:   White wins (1-0) | Black wins (0-1) | Draws (1/2-1/2) | Pillsbury wins | Pillsbury loses  
 

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 39 OF 39 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jan-12-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  TheFocus: Looking forward to the new Pillsbury volumes!!
Jan-13-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: It shouldn't take longer to write a book about a chess career than the career itself.
Mar-16-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jean Defuse: ...

<Pillsbury in January 1894>

A engraving of the young Pillsbury clipped from 'The Kansas City Gazette, 7 Jan 1894' by our member <paderamo> with the header:

Chess Player Harry Pillsbury - The Boston Boy Seems to Have Championship Material In Him.

The recent chessmasters' tournament in New York City demonstrated that Harry N. Pillsbury, Boston's boy chess player, is a very formidable aspirant for the championship of the land of the free and the home of the brave...

https://www.newspapers.com/clip/453...

...

<H. N. Pillsbury's fine play>

Eight Chess Games Played Blindfold and at Once.

H. N. Pillsbury the Boston chess player gave a very successful exhibition of simultaneous blindfold play at the Brooklyn Chess Club against, eight strong members of the club. The single player won five, drew two and lost one game.

The appended game was considered the best of the series by Pillsbury. The score:

[Event "8-board blindfold display"]
[Site "New York, Brooklyn CC"]
[Date "1894.01.??"]
[White "Pillsbury, Harry Nelson"]
[Black "Frere, Walter"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C26"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nc6 3. g3 Bc5 4. Bg2 d6 5. d3 Nf6 6. h3 Nd4 7. Bd2 c6 8. Na4 Bb6 9. Nxb6 axb6 10. c3 Ne6 11. Ne2 h6 12. O-O Ng5 13. Kh2 g6 14. f4 Ne6 15. Ng1 exf4 16. Bxf4 Nxf4 17. Rxf4 Be6 18. d4 d5 19. e5 Nh5 20. Rf2 O-O 21. Qd2 Kh7 22. g4 Ng7 23. Rf6 Ne8 24. Rf2 Ng7 25. Raf1 Rxa2 26. Bf3 Qg5 27. Qc2 Rfa8 28. Be2 Qe7 29. Bd3 b5 30. Rf6 Qe8 31. Nf3 Ra1 32. Rxa1 Rxa1 33. Nh4 Kg8 34. Nxg6 fxg6 35. Bxg6 Qe7 36. Bh7+ Kh8 37. Qg6 Bg8 38. Bxg8 Kxg8 39. e6 Re1 40. Rf7 Qd6+ 41. Kg2 Rg1+ 42. Kxg1 Qg3+ 43. Kf1 Qxh3+ 44. Ke2 1-0

Source: New York Times 8. Jan. 1894. (see - Walter Frere)

...

Dec-05-19  Nosnibor: <jnpope> His your long awaited volume 2 of Pillsbury`s games now available for purchase ? It would be amazing if you could announce that today on Pillsbury`s birthday.
Dec-05-19  jnpope: It would be amazing if it were true... but alas I'm not finished with the final stage (I'm posting progress reports daily under my profile here). Hopefully by the 12th I will have digital preview copies circulating to my Chess Archaeology Press partners...

Also this isn't a second volume of the 1996 book... this is a new two vol set... vol 1 covers 1872-1899 and vol 2 will be 1900-1906. Tons of new material covering Pillsbury's life that basically obsoletes everything that has ever come before (including my own 1996 effort).

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: Hi all! Pillsbury, what a wonderful player he was. Truly one of the most magnificents chess talents ever. Here is the translation of an interview I have not seen published anywhere but in this Spanish blog: http://quienesjugaronajedrez.blogsp...

1st PART

I: "Tell me about your parents."

HP: "My father was Luther Batchelder Pillsbury a high school teacher who became a successful real estate merchant. My mother was a good woman, from whom I keep good memories, the sweetest. She was María A. Leathe teacher and writer. My mother died on November 20, 1888, and it was then that I left the school, my world had collapsed. After I started playing chess, it was a way to alleviate my great loss.

I: "Who was your first instructor?"

HP: "In 1889 I became a member of the Somerville Checker and Chess Club. My first chess instructor was Addison Smith, a member of the Boston Chess Club who lived in Somerville."

I: "That of chess talents been born... A fallacy?"

HP: "Yes, silly arguments."

I: "What other instructors did you have?"

HP: "Jonathan Hall, a well-known Boston Problemist, and Henry Nathan Stone, a veteran Baltimore expert. Baseball was for a while my passion, but after I quit for chess I lost my relationship with many of my Baseball friends.

I: "Blindfold exhibitions."

HP: "I would be 19 years old when I started. I used to sit in a separate room, away from my opponents, and a person would come and tell me the movement of each opponent, then I would respond to that movement and he would go away."

I: "Boston Wonder."

HP: "My nickname in those days that I played in Boston."

I: "The Hero of Hastings."

HP: "In 1895, I was elected to represent the Brooklyn Chess Club in the Hastings Chess Congress. I embarked for England in July 1895. I did not stay at the same hotel where the other chess players were accommodated, I registered at another. He wanted to be calm, without distractions to win this tournament. So I did it. After my triumph, they called me that.

I: "How old were you?"

HP: "22 years old."

I: "How many games did you win?"

HP: "I was successful in 15, draw 3 and lost 3."

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: 2nd PART

I: "You lost to Chigorin?"

HP: "Yes, it happened in my first game. I don't forget that first round. It was a bad start, but then I won nine straight games. I finished ahead of current World Champion Emanuel Lasker, and former World Champion William Steinitz. Those thousand dollars of the prize came in handy."

I: "Isidor Arthur Gunsberg."

HP: "I played against him in Hastings the last game. Isidor faced Steinitz in the World Championship and the result was 10½-8½. A strong player who once beat Blackburne in a match. Mikhail Chigorin was winning his game and I was forced to beat Isidor, a draw was not enough for me."

I: "After your return from England as the Champion, what were your activities?"

HP: "After my return from London, I started a tour throughout North America. From October 1899 to April 1900, I also went to Canada and Cuba. I have given more than 150 exhibitions, many of them blindfolded, and I have traveled a little over 40,000 kilometers."

I: "What did it mean to you to be the United States Champion?"

HP: "It felt like a minor achievement. I've always wanted to be the World Champion. My wife has tried to arrange a meeting with Lasker, but he has refused. And it seems to me that now it will be impossible, there is no time; I'm done."

I: "Antiphlogistine, Periostio, Takadiastasa, Plasmon, Ambrosia, Threlkeld, Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, micrococcus, Plasmodium, Freiheit, Etchenberg, Rost de Piet Potgelter, Salamagundi, Oomisillecootsi, Bangmanvate, Zimbabwe, Nek de Schlechter, Manzinyama, Teosofía, Madjesoomalops."

(His face seems for a moment to rejuvenate; Radiant and happy he says:) HP: "You have reminded me of good times. It is part of the list of words that they gave me before starting a simultaneous exhibition. I had only a minute to memorize them. I read the list and returned it to the referee. At the end, hours after the games, I repeated from memory all the words and continued reciting them in the reverse order. I have always had an excellent memory. It happened in London in 1896. The word list was given to me by H. Threlkeld-Edwards, a surgeon, and Mansfield Merriman, a professor of civil engineering. London newspapers reported the story."

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: 3rd PART

I: "What do these words mean?"

HP: "Antiphlogistine was a medication for the relief of inflammation. Periosteum is the membrane of a bone. Takadiastase is an artificial food. Plasmon is a genetic type of cytoplasm. Ambrosia is the food of the Greek gods. Threlkeld is the name of the surgeon who made the list for me to memorize. Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus are strains of bacteria. Plasmodium is a fungus. Freiheit is a German word for "freedom". Etchenberg is surely a made-up word, to make the list more difficult. Rost de Piet Potgelter is a city. Salamagundi is a minced chicken dish. Oomisillecootsi was a Zulu general. Bangmanvate was a settlement in Zimbabwe. Nek de Schlechter was a settlement in Africa, where the British put down a Boer rebellion. Manzinyama is a lake in southern Africa. Theosophy was a spiritual movement in the 1890s. Madjesoomalops is a dish consisting of herrings and pickles.

(His admirers have stood in long lines to see him, they have considered him a magician.)

HP: "I got to play 16 blindfolded chess games simultaneously, 10 checkers games also blindfolded and a whist hand, and at the end I repeated from memory a list of 30 words. I appreciated those people who witnessed my demonstration as much as they loved me. They always showed me their affection.

I: "Can you describe those moments for me?"

HP: "When starting the games, the nerves disappeared. My concentration was total, because if I transmitted a wrong move to the referee, such as not realizing that my king was in check, if I moved another piece on the board I automatically lost the game. My rivals played watching the board. I used to have my back to them and I transmitted the moves to the referee, who in turn transmitted them to my opponents."

I: "Do you remember the Hastings prizes?

(He smiles and says:)

HP: "Are you testing me? First place 150 pounds, second place 115 pounds, third place 85 pounds, fourth place 60 pounds, fifth place 40 pounds, sixth place 30 pounds, seventh place 20 pounds. Total prize £ 500, with consolation prizes included. There were also special awards. For those who won most of their games with the accepted Evans Gambit, playing with any color, they were awarded with a beautiful ring plus a copy of "Theorie and Practice of chess" in four volumes worth £ 40. The winner of the first 7 games was awarded an enlarged photo worth £ 4. Each participant who did not win a top seven prize received a consolation prize of 1 pound for each game they had won and doubled the prize if they defeated any of the first three prize winners."

I: "Maria E. Bush."

HP: "My wife. She is the daughter of Albert J. Bush and the beautiful Charlotte Victoria. Mary's father was a lawyer and a judge. I was engaged to her for about three years. I married her on January 17, 1901 and we were joined by the Rev. Frank de Witt Talmage, at the house of my wife's brother; William Bush. I met Maria in Philadelphia. We had mutual friends, and one day they introduced her to me. She and I were friends for a long time."

I: "Albert Hodges."

HP: "Former US Chess Champion."

Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <HP: "You have reminded me of good times. It is part of the list of words that they gave me before starting a simultaneous exhibition. I had only a minute to memorize them. I read the list and returned it to the referee. At the end, hours after the games, I repeated from memory all the words and continued reciting them in the reverse order. I have always had an excellent memory. It happened in London in 1896. The word list was given to me by H. Threlkeld-Edwards, a surgeon, and Mansfield Merriman, a professor of civil engineering. London newspapers reported the story.">

But that happened in Philadelphia in 1900. This whole interview smells fishy.

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: 4th PART

I: "Ajeeb 'The Egyptian'."

HP: "Albert Hodges encouraged me to be the one who handled this automaton. He charged $ 70 a week, as you know Ajeeb was inspired by the creation of Von Kempelen, the famous "Turk". At that time, I drank whiskey, frequented women and smoked excessively. Ajeeb "The Egyptian" was built by Charles Hooper, craftsman from Bristol, and was exhibited for the first time at the Royal Polytechnic Institute in London. He then spent eight years in the Crystal Palace in the same city, and in 1877 he was transferred to the Royal Aquarium in Westminster. He played checkers for ten cents and chess for twenty-five. Later 100,000 people came to witness his exploits in Berlin. He visited Brussels, Paris and, in 1885, already in the United States: New York, Minneapolis, Chicago and Kansas City."

I: "April 28, 1900."

HP: "I set another blindfolded World Record against 20 opponents at the Franklin Chess Club in Philadelphia. I took 6 hours and 30 minutes, won fourteen games, lost one and drew five. After the exhibition, I was asked to remember all the movements in all the games, so to help some of my opponents correcting their score sheets. I have beaten my own records one by one."

I: "What have been your results in the various tournaments in which you have participated?

- I will tell you some: third place, after Lasker and Steinitz in Saint Petersburg at the end of 1895, Third place in Nuremberg in 1896, first in Vienna in 1898, second in London 1899; second in Paris 1900, and first in Munich 1900."

I: "That Saint Petersburg's cuadrangular."

(Harry falls silent. After putting himself together, he says:)

HP: "You already know the saying: one night with Venus and all life with Mercury (on his face the beginning of a smile is drawn, which does not end and fades away. He then explains:) I did not get the disease from a Russian lady. When the doctor checked me in this country, I had already presented symptoms before, open and moist sores on various parts of the body and swollen nodes. I suspected the origin of my disease, I was afraid, but finding out the diagnosis was devastating."

I: "The news of having contracted syphilis surely affected his performance."

HP: "Yes, to the symptoms of this terrible disease, a neurosis was added that immediately overwhelmed me after receiving the news, it was something that struck me. I have never felt so much uneasiness. I was then leader, with 6 ½ of 9, in front of the World Champion, Lasker, I had a point; Steinitz was 4 ½ and Chigorin only 1 ½, a victory against Lasker would have put me at a great distance from the others, but I lost 5 more games."

I: "Have you been treated?"

HP: "I will tell you that the treatments I have received based on mercury and other substances have been tremendous, painful and useless."

I: "You have always had women around you. Tell me about your support for women's chess."

HP: "On numerous occasions I have met several ladies who like chess. I simultaneously played with fourteen members of the Ladies Chess Club. In the Metropolitan Club of New York I played against five ladies. I have also played with women from Brooklyn and New York. From the association Art de Damas I remember her president Mrs. Gray, but also Mrs. Tuly, Mrs. D'Aghroors, Mrs. Morford, Mrs. Doritzer, Mrs. Cohorer, Mrs. Titcomb, Mrs. Thomas, Mrs. Basset, Mrs. Morrell, Mrs. Forbes, Mrs. Hanley, Mrs. Thomas, and Mrs. Ford."

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: Well, MissScarlett, I'm just translating it for the good of us all Pillsbury admirers. It is true that some facts do not seem to match with what other sources have offered.
Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: I think you've wasted your time. Part IV is just too much.
Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: LAST PART

I: "Lasker."

HP: "I could have beaten him had he agreed to give me the opportunity to be his rival in a World Championship match. But life is difficult, and all our aspirations are not always conquered. Lasker and I have played five times, each winning 5 wins and 4 draws. The last time I beat him was at the Cambridge Springs Tournament in 1904, the disease had undermined me, it really was exhausting to play. You don't know how sorry I was to lose to Lasker that tragic day in St. Petersburg! Lasker would have found no way to refuse to give me a chance to challenge him to a title match. Had that day beaten him! How many times have I relived in my mind that opportunity that I let go!"

I: "Has Emanuel Lasker been an obsession in your life?"

HP: "I confess that I always dreamed and fought for an opportunity to achieve the title. I always aimed to be the World Champion. Maybe it became a fixed idea. When you accept that you would never play against Lasker, I thought of going to the United States and studying law."

I say goodbye to Harry, I look at his eyes, flooded with tears, his face reflects an infinite and serene sadness. Outside the room I speak to a doctor who tells me that in past days Harry was delirious, chatting about the moves of a game and that several times he called Lasker's name and that only the voice and love of his wife could appease him. The doctor confirmed that Harry was in the third phase of the disease and that his hallucinations and delusions were due to this, as well as his episodes of fury. The last thing I knew was that on November 8, 1905, he and his wife went to Bermuda in an attempt to improve their health. In Bermuda, he became ill again. He returned to his home in Philadelphia in January 1906 and in March suffered partial paralysis. He died of general paralysis from neurosyphilis at 4AM on June 17, 1906 at the age of 33. Pillsbury was buried at Laurel Hill Cemetery in Reading, Massachusetts. On his grave, only his name is written. It is unfair and sad that no reference to the game of chess is mentioned, an activity that was the reason for its existence.

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: Yeah well MissScarlet I don't mind spending 20 minutes of my life translating and posting something that might be useful, you know? Definitely not wasted time in my view.
Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: 20 minutes!? Did you use Google Translate?
Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: I'm Spanish and I speak English. I did not have any problems. I used Google Translate just for the definition of the weird words given at that exhibition. I didn't feel like putting effort into that.
Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: They went to Bermuda in an attempt to improve HIS health, I don't know why I wrote "their". Of course my english is far from perfect, but I hope you all understand the text without any major problem. Cheers.
Jun-16-20  jnpope: Three things give that interview away as being a fabrication. Otherwise a nice hoax piece.

Bonus points to anyone else who identifies the three gross inaccuracies.

Miss Scarlet leads the field. ;-)

Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <I: "What do these words mean?"

HP: "Antiphlogistine was a medication for the relief of inflammation. Periosteum is the membrane of a bone. Takadiastase is an artificial food. Plasmon is a genetic type of cytoplasm. Ambrosia is the food of the Greek gods. Threlkeld is the name of the surgeon who made the list for me to memorize. Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus are strains of bacteria. Plasmodium is a fungus. Freiheit is a German word for "freedom". Etchenberg is surely a made-up word, to make the list more difficult. Rost de Piet Potgelter is a city. Salamagundi is a minced chicken dish. Oomisillecootsi was a Zulu general. Bangmanvate was a settlement in Zimbabwe. Nek de Schlechter was a settlement in Africa, where the British put down a Boer rebellion. Manzinyama is a lake in southern Africa. Theosophy was a spiritual movement in the 1890s. Madjesoomalops is a dish consisting of herrings and pickles.>

Plagiarism: https://reader.exacteditions.com/is...

Zimbabwe is an obvious anachronism.

<On his grave, only his name is written. It is unfair and sad that no reference to the game of chess is mentioned, an activity that was the reason for its existence.>

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial...

Assuming this is the original marker.

Jun-16-20  bostonwonder: Yeah I figured it was made up since the blog's author does not give any source he has taken the interview from. Probably he imagined himself being the one interviewing Harry. Glad to know its clarified. Cheers.
Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: Yeah, cheers.
Jun-16-20  Nosnibor: <jnpope> 1.How can he be called the Hastings hero in Boston before he set foot in England? 2 "Ajeeb" was operated by C F Burrille not Albert Hodges. 3 When asked about his tournament successes Pillsbury did not allude to the greatest Hastings 1895.4 He came second in Vienna 1898 losing the playoff to Tarrasch No mention of him being treated by Dr Tarrasch for his illness.
Jun-16-20
Premium Chessgames Member
  MissScarlett: <1.How can he be called the Hastings hero in Boston before he set foot in England?>

He's referring to the moniker <The Boston Wonder>.

<Ajeeb" was operated by C F Burrille not Albert Hodges.>

Hodges operated it, too, so this can't be a glaring error.

Jun-16-20  jnpope: <Assuming this is the original marker.>

Nice guess, but no, his grave marker was originally just inscribed with his name. That marker you linked to was created for a re-dedication ceremony held back in June 2006 (the centennial of his death). The hoaxer gets points for knowing that.

The first clue for me was also nailed by <MissScarlett>.

The second clue for me was having Pillsbury reportedly saying "...I have traveled a little over 40,000 kilometers." Pillsbury would have never used "kilometers" in casual conversation (nor would any American then or now). We are a stubborn lot when it comes to using "miles."

The third clue for me was "...at the house of my wife's brother; William Bush." Now that's just shoddy research and bad fact checking. William Bush died before the age of 3.

The page at https://www.findagrave.com/memorial... would lead a hoaxer into believing William died in 1908, but the grave marker actually says "Died May 2, 1860" with "Æ. 2 years 3 mos" (possibly "8") on the line below. Someone obviously mistook the "os" on the second line as "08" and made a dating mistake and the hoaxer took it at face-value that William lived long enough to host his sister's wedding. Genealogical research sites indicate that Mary Ellen had a second brother, named Elvin, who lived and worked in Chicago from about 1890 until his death in 1915 (and it also confirms William died in 1860).

Those things tipped it off as a hoax to me. Not to mention that nobody openly talked about having syphilis, let alone to a reporter.
Jun-18-20  bostonwonder: In Spain we use kilometers, maybe when translating it from whatever source he may have take the interview from decided to use the kilometers term because of his spanish readers. Still, as you pointed out there are several factors that make one doubt about its validity.
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