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Member since Oct-06-10
<The World>> vs. <<GM Arkadij Naiditsch>

Chessgames Challenge: The World vs Naiditsch, 2014

[Event "Chessgames Challenge"]
[Site "chessgames.com"]
[Date "2014.06.16"]
[EventDate "2013.06.16"]
[Round "-"]
[Result "*"]
[White "The World"]
[Black "Arkadij Naiditsch"]
[ECO "A01"]
[WhiteElo "2705"]
[BlackElo "?"]
[PlyCount "0"]

1.e4 *

Voting for the opening move began on June 16, 2014, at 17:00 EDT.

FINAL VOTE TALLY: (First Move)

1.e4 211 votes (46.7%)
1.d4 204 votes (45.1%)
1.c4 12 votes (2.7%)
1.Nf3 11 votes (2.4%)
1.Nc3 3 votes (0.7%)
1.f4 3 votes (0.7%)
1.b4 3 votes (0.7%)
1.g3 2 votes (0.4%)
1.b3 2 votes (0.4%)

total # of votes: 452
draw requests: 6 (1.3%)

If you would like information posted in the header please contact User: hms123

Chessgames.com Full Member

   Analysis Forum has kibitzed 100 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Sep-18-13 S Williams vs The World, 2013 (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: <DcGentle> I have just posted the link to <GM Smirnov's> video in my header while you are waiting to hear from the admins on posting it in the sticky.
 
   Sep-11-13 Analysis Forum chessforum (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: <Start for Chessgames Challenge: S Williams vs The World, 2013 >
 
   Aug-01-12 The World vs Akobian, 2012 (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: I will be updating the position and the game in my header: Analysis Forum chessforum (or click on the <yellow sticky> for access.)
 
   Jul-20-12 hms123 chessforum (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: <cro777> I just checked and it is hidden from Akobian, but not from anyone on the team.
 
   Oct-10-11 Akobian vs The World, 2011 (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: <<<<FORUM LINE CHANGE>>>> At <WinKing's> request, we have changed the <Analysis Forum> so that it hosts the <Analysis of 17.Qd2 Ba6> [DIAGRAM] <including, but not limited to, 18.Bd3 and 18.Bxd7>
 
   Nov-23-10 The World vs N Pogonina, 2010 (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: <WinKing> and anyone else: We are currently hosting analysis of this position: 32.Rxa8 Rxa8 <33.Bf1 Bxf1 34.Kxf1> [DIAGRAM] Feel free to use the <Analysis Forum> for those lines.
 
   Oct-06-10 crawfb5 chessforum (replies)
 
Analysis Forum: LOL I'm so dumb. Hello. Fear me.
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 19 OF 95 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-14-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kutztown46: After 26. f4 Nc6:


click for larger view

Analysis by Stockfish 2.0.1 JA 64bit (34-ply):

1. = (0.04): 27.Qd3 b5 28.b3 Qd6 29.b4 Rc4 30.Ne3 Qxd3 31.Rxd3 Rd4 32.Rxd4 Nxd4 33.Kf2 f5 34.Rd1 Re4 35.g3 Kf7 36.Rd2 g6 37.Nd1 Nc6 38.Nc3 Rd4 39.Ke3 Rxd2 40.Kxd2 a6 41.Nd5 Nb8 42.Kd3 Ke6

2. = (0.00): 27.Qd2 Rc4 28.Qf2 Ree4 29.g3 Rcd4 30.Nc3 Qd7 31.Nxe4 Rxd1 32.Rxd1 Qxd1+ 33.Kg2 Nd4 34.Nc3 Qd3 35.Qf1 Qc2+ 36.Qf2 Qd3

3. (-5.09): 27.Nf6+ Qxf6 28.Qxf6 gxf6 29.Rf2 Rc4 30.g3 Nd4 31.Kg2 Kg7 32.Rd3 Kg6 33.Rd1

Nov-15-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Analysis Forum: <<<<MARKER>>>>

*** <Analysis of <26. Nc4>>


click for larger view

Nov-19-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Analysis Forum: <<<<MARKER>>>>

*** <Analysis of <26. Ng6>>


click for larger view

Nov-19-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  hms123: Varuzhan Akobian - The World, Chessgames Challenge 2011


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 1.5a w32: 25 ply

1. = (0.02): 28.Rfe1 Rxe1+ 29.Qxe1 Rc6 30.Qd2 Kh7 31.Qd3 Qd6 32.Kf2 Qe5 33.Nc3 Qc5+ 34.Kf1 Re6 35.f4 Kg8 36.b4 Qc6 37.Nd5 Ne7

2. = (0.02): 28.f4 Qc8 29.Nc3 Nh4 30.Qd7 Nf5 31.Qxc8 Rcxc8 32.Rd7 Ne3 33.Re1 Nc4 34.Rxe8+ Rxe8 35.Rxa7 Nxb2 36.Nd5 Nc4 37.a4 Rd8

3. = (0.02): 28.Nc3 Qc8 29.f4 Nh4 30.Qd7 Nf5 31.Qxc8 Rcxc8 32.Rd7 Ne3 33.Re1 Nc4 34.Rxe8+ Rxe8 35.Rxa7 Nxb2 36.Nd5 Nc4 37.a4 Rd8

4. = (0.00): 28.Rf2 Qc8 29.Kh2 Nh4 30.b3 Rc5 31.b4 Rc4 32.Re2 Rxe2 33.Qxe2 Rc2 34.Rd2 Rxd2 35.Qxd2 Qc4 36.Ne7+ Kh7 37.Qd8 f6 38.Kg3 Nxg2 39.Kxg2 Qe2+ 40.Kg3 Qe1+ 41.Kg2 Qe2+ 42.Kg3

5. = (0.00): 28.Kh1 Qc8 29.Rf2 Ne7 30.Nxe7+ Rxe7 31.Qd8+ Qxd8 32.Rxd8+ Kh7 33.g4 g5 34.Kg2 Kg7 35.Rfd2 Rc1 36.Kf2 Ree1 37.R8d7 a6 38.Rb7 Rf1+ 39.Ke3

(hms123, 19.11.2011)

Nov-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  Analysis Forum: <<<<MARKER>>>>

*** <Analysis of <28. Qe3>>


click for larger view

Nov-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  hms123: Varuzhan Akobian - The World, Chessgames Challenge 2011


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 1.5a w32: 26 ply

1. = (-0.09): 28...Ng6 29.Qd3 Rc2 30.Rf2 Rc1 31.Qf1 Rxd1 32.Qxd1 Qc5 33.b4 Qd6 34.Rd2 Qe5 35.Rd3 Rc8 36.Rd2 Qg5 37.Kh2 Nf4 38.Nxf4 Qxf4+ 39.g3 Qc4 40.Kg2 Qc3

2. = (0.00): 28...Rc2 29.Rf2 Rxf2 30.Qxf2 Ng6 31.Qd2 Qc5+ 32.Kh1 Nh4 33.Nc3 Nf5 34.Ne4 Qe5 35.Qd7 Re7 36.Qd8+ Re8 37.Qd7 Re7

3. = (0.00): 28...Rc6 29.Qd4 Rce6 30.Nf4 R6e7 31.Nd5 Re6 32.Nf4

4. = (0.00): 28...Rc5 29.b4 Rc6 30.Qd4 Rc4 31.Qe3 Ng6 32.Qd3 Kh8 33.Rfe1 Rxe1+ 34.Rxe1 Rc2 35.Ne7 Nf4 36.Nxc8 Nxd3 37.Re8+ Kh7 38.Nxa7 Nf4 39.Kf1 g5 40.Nc8 Rc1+ 41.Kf2 Rc2+ 42.Kf1 Rc1+

5. = (0.00): 28...Nc6 29.Qf2 Ne7 30.Nc3 Rc7 31.Rfe1 Rd8 32.Rxd8+ Qxd8 33.Rd1 Rd7 34.Rxd7 Qxd7 35.Qe3 Ng6 36.Kf2 f6 37.Qe4 Qd2+ 38.Qe2 Qd4+ 39.Qe3 Qd7 40.Qe4

(hms123, 21.11.2011)

Nov-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  hms123: After <28.Qe3 Ng6 29.Qd3 Rc2 30.Rf2 Rc1>

Varuzhan Akobian - The World, Chessgames Challenge 2011


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 1.5a w32: 25 ply

1. = (-0.06): 31.Rfd2 Qc5+ 32.Kh2 Qd6+ 33.Kg1 Rxd1+ 34.Rxd1 Kh8 35.Qd2 Rd8 36.Qe3 Qc6 37.Nc3 Rxd1+ 38.Nxd1 Qc2 39.Qd4 Qc1 40.Kh2 Kh7 41.Ne3 Qc7+ 42.Kg1 Qe5 43.Qxe5 Nxe5 44.b4 Kg6 45.Kf1 Nd3 46.Ke2 Nf4+

2. = (-0.09): 31.f4 Rxd1+ 32.Qxd1 Qc5 33.g3 Ne7 34.Nxe7+ Rxe7 35.Kg2 Re3 36.Rd2 g6 37.Rd3 Re4 38.Rc3 Qb5 39.Rc2 Re7 40.Rd2 Qc6+ 41.Qf3 Qc5 42.Qd1 Re3 43.Rd3

3. = (-0.10): 31.Rxc1 Qxc1+ 32.Kh2 Qc5 33.Rd2 Qd6+ 34.Kg1 Qe5 35.Nc3 Nf4 36.Qd6 Qxd6 37.Rxd6 Ne2+ 38.Nxe2 Rxe2 39.Rd8+ Kh7 40.Rd7 a5 41.b4 Ra2 42.Rd6 Rxa3 43.Rxb6 axb4 44.Rxb4 g5 45.Rb2 h5

4. = (-0.11): 31.Qf1 Rxd1 32.Qxd1 Qc5 33.b4 Qd6 34.Rd2 b5 35.Kh1 Qe5 36.Rc2 Nf4 37.Nxf4 Qxf4 38.Re2 Rc8 39.Re1 a6 40.Qd7 Rc3 41.a4 bxa4

5. = (-0.11): 31.Kh2 Rxd1 32.Qxd1 Qc5 33.Rd2 Qd6+ 34.Kh1 Qe5 35.Qf1 Qg3 36.Rd1 Nf4 37.Nxf4 Qxf4 38.Kg1 g6 39.Qd3 Re3 40.Qd4 Qxd4 41.Rxd4 Re2 42.Ra4 Rxb2 43.Rxa7 Kg7 44.Kh2 h5

(hms123, 21.11.2011)

Nov-21-11
Premium Chessgames Member
  kutztown46: After 28. Qe3:


click for larger view

Analysis by Stockfish 2.0.1 JA 64bit (32-ply):

1. = (-0.16): 28...Ng6 29.Qd3 Rc2 30.Rf2 Rc1 31.Kh2 Rxd1 32.Qxd1 Qc5 33.Rd2 Qd6+ 34.Kg1 Qg3 35.Re2 Rxe2 36.Qxe2 Qg5 37.Qb5 Qe5 38.Nc3 Qe3+ 39.Kh2 Qf4+ 40.Kh1 Kh7 41.Qe2 Qe5 42.Kg1 Qd4+ 43.Kh2 Nf4 44.Qe4+

2. = (0.00): 28...Rc5 29.b4 Rc6 30.Qd4 Ng6 31.f4 Re2 32.Rf2 Rxf2 33.Qxf2 Rc1 34.Qf3 Rxd1+ 35.Qxd1 Qc4 36.g3 Nf8 37.Ne7+ Kh7 38.Qd8 Qc1+ 39.Kf2 Qb2+ 40.Ke1 Qa1+ 41.Ke2 Qb2+ 42.Kd1 Qb1+ 43.Kd2

3. = (0.00): 28...Qe6 29.Rfe1 Rc5 30.Nf4 Qc6 31.b4 Rc2 32.Qe4 Qxe4 33.Rxe4 Rc4 34.Rxc4 Nxc4 35.Rd7 a5 36.Rd4 Re1+ 37.Kh2 Nxa3 38.bxa5 bxa5 39.Ra4 Nc2 40.Rxa5 g5 41.Nd5 Nd4 42.Ra4 Nf5 43.f4 Kg7

4. = (0.00): 28...Rc2 29.Rf2 Rc5 30.Re2 Rc2 31.Rf2

5. = (0.00): 28...Re6 29.f4 Ng6 30.Qg3 Qc5+ 31.Kh2 Rd6 32.f5 Rxd5 33.Rxd5 Qxd5 34.fxg6 fxg6 35.Qxg6 Qe5+ 36.Qg3 Qxb2 37.Qd6 Qd4 38.Qe6+ Kh7 39.Qf5+ Kh8 40.Qf8+ Kh7 41.Qf5+

6. = (0.00): 28...Ng4 29.Ne7+ Kf8 30.Qxb6 axb6 31.Nxc8 Rcxc8 32.fxg4 Re2 33.Rf2 Rxf2 34.Kxf2 Rc2+ 35.Kf3 Rxb2 36.Re1 f6 37.Re3 Kf7 38.Rc3 Ke6 39.Rc7 g5 40.Rb7 Kd5 41.Rd7+ Ke5 42.Re7+ Kd5 43.Rd7+

7. = (0.00): 28...Kh8 29.Rfe1 Re6 30.Nf4 Re7 31.Nd5 Re6

8. = (0.00): 28...Rc6 29.Qd4 Rc2 30.Rfe1 Qxh3 31.Ne7+ Kf8 32.gxh3 Nxf3+ 33.Kf1 Nh2+ 34.Kg1 Nf3+

9. = (0.00): 28...Kf8 29.Rfe1 Rc2 30.b3 Ng6 31.Qxe8+ Qxe8 32.Rxe8+ Kxe8 33.Rd4 Kf8 34.Ne3 Rb2 35.Nf5 Kg8 36.Ra4 a5 37.b4 axb4 38.Rxb4 Rxb4 39.axb4 Nf4 40.b5 Nd5 41.Kf2 Kf8 42.g4 Nc3 43.Nd4 Nd5 44.Nf5

10. = (0.00): 28...Nc6 29.Qf2 Ne7 30.Nc3 Nf5 31.Rd3 h5 32.Rfd1 h4 33.Kh2 Qe6 34.Kg1 Qc8

Jan-03-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <Tabanus: 1.a3 and if 1...e5 then 2.e3, French with a6>

<Domdaniel: The response to watch out for is the dastardly 1...g6 and 2...Bg7, when White, sadly, has to *do* something. 3.h4 might be interesting.>

VA would probably play 1...d5. <Dom> is quite right about 1...g6.

Jan-04-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  Tabanus: FWIW, I spent a few hours more :) Ending up with something like

1.a3 d5 2.Nf3 g6

(2...c5 3.e3 Nc6 4.d4)

(2...Nf6 3.e3 c5 4.d4 e6 5.c4, reversed Tarrasch?)

3.e3 (rather than 3.c4 d4) Bg7 4.c4

Jan-04-12  blue wave: This is my pet line against the french as white.

Opening Explorer

Not well known but avoids the trench warfare and closed positions of french.

Just my 2 cents worth.

Jan-04-12  blue wave: Actually white is a bit better with Nc3 then perhaps Bb5+. Anyway have to dash.
Jan-04-12  karpkasp: If we want to investigate new territories in the French defence, why not the "Nordic" gambit?

1. e4 e6 2. Nf3 d5 3. e5 c5 4. b4!?

According to Houdini 1.5a the best moves are 4... cxb4 ( 0.04/26) 5. a3 ( 0.06/27) 5... Qa5 (0.00/27)

Here, 5... Nc6 is more common: 6. axb4 Bxb4 7. c3 Be7 8. d4 h5!? 0.02/26 More often played are 8... f6, 8... Bd7 or 8... Nh6

If 5... d4, Houdini plays 6. axb4 ( 0.11/25) 6... Bxb4 7. Ba3 Be7 ( 0.16/25)

Please note that at move 4. Houdini's choice is 4. c3 0.05/26 with a possible transposition in the Advance variation (4... Nc6 5. d4 Qb6). If 4... d4, 5. Bd3!? ( 0.10/25).

I'm not a gambit player, consider this as a suggestion, not a recommandation :)

Jan-04-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Anderssen's Opening - Tarrasch Defense Reversed

1.a3 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.e3 c5 4.d4 e6 5.c4 Nc6 6.Nc3 a6


click for larger view

An illustrative correspondence chess game from the Russian Team Championship 2009 (the diagram position has been reached by transposition 1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. e3 e6 5. d4 d5 6. a3 a6).

[Event "5.Russian Team Championship (Final)"]
[Site "ICCF"]
[Date "2009.09.15"]
[White "Zolochevsky, Valery Alekseevich"]
[Black "Rudyak, Ivan Dmitrievich"]
[WhiteElo "2308"]
[BlackElo "2399"]

1. c4 c5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. e3 e6 5. d4 d5 6. a3 a6 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. b4 Ba7 9. Bb2 O-O 10. Qc2 Qe7 11. Rd1 Rd8 12. Be2 dxc4 13. Rxd8+ Nxd8 14. Ne4 Nxe4 15. Qxe4 f5 16. Qxc4 b5 17. Qc3 Bb7 18. O-O Rc8 19. Qd3 Be4 20. Qd1 Bb8 21. Qa1 Bd5 22. Rc1
1/2-1/2

Up to move 18 the players followed the game Petronic-Lekic from the Yougoslav Team Championship 1994.

BTW, GMVA is an expert in the Tarrasch Defense.

Jan-05-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Anderssen's Opening - Croatian Connection

The main proponent of the move <1.a3> is Croatian correspondence chess Senior International Master Dr Zvonko Krečak. He is president of Correspondence Chess Association of Croatia (CCAC) and editor of national CC magazine "Glasnik / Herald".

Krecak has doctorate in physics. His searches for hadronic axions from solar core are adopted by worldwide famous Particle Data Group in its reports.

Here is his game against Nikolai Papenin from the 17th Olympiad Final board 5.

Event "ICCF Olympiad 17 Final"]
[Site "ICCF"]
[Date "2009.09.10"]
[White "Krecak, Dr. Zvonko"]
[Black "Papenin, Nikolai"]
[WhiteElo "2374"]
[BlackElo "2469"]

1. a3 g6 2. e4 c5 3. Nf3 Bg7 4. Nc3 Nc6 5. Bc4 e6 6. O-O Nge7 7. d3 d5 8. Ba2 O-O 9. h3 b6 10. Rb1 Bb7 11. Bf4 Nd4 12. Re1 Nxf3+ 13. Qxf3 Nc6 14. Nb5 dxe4 15. dxe4 Nd4 16. Nxd4 cxd4 17. Qg3 Qc8 18. Be5 Bxe5 19. Qxe5 Qxc2 20. Qxd4 Rad8 21. Qb4 Qc7 22. Bb3 a5 23. Qb5 Rd2 24. Rbc1 Qd6 25. Rcd1 Qd4 26. Rxd2 Qxd2 27. Re2 Qc1+ 28. Kh2 Qf4+ 29. g3 Qf3 30. Bc2 Rc8 31. Qd3 Qf6 32. Bb1 Rc1 33. Kg2 Kg7 34. Ba2 Qe5 35. f3 Qc5 36. Rf2 Bc6 37. Bb3 Bb5 38. Qd2 Rb1 39. Ba2 Ra1 40. Bb3 h5 41. h4 a4 42. Bd1 e5 43. Be2 Bxe2 44. Qxe2 Rc1 45. g4 hxg4 46. fxg4 Qe7 47. Qf3
1/2-1/2

At present, the Ukrainean CC Grandmaster Nikolai Papenin, with the current rating 2729, is on the 1st position in ICCF World rankig.

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: ===== GM Akobian in Gibraltar =====

GM Varuzhan Akobian is taking part at the major event of the Tradewise Chess Festival - the Masters, which is beeing held in Gibraltar over 10 days from 24th January to 2nd February, 2012. Celebrating its tenth anniversary, the Gibraltar Chess Festival has established itself as the most prestigious open tournament in the world.

In the first round he won with black against IM Marcel Peek (2354) of Netherlands.

[Event "Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2012 "]
[Date "2012.01.24"]
[White "Peek, Marcel"]
[Black "Akobian, Varuzhan"]
[WhiteElo "2354"]
[BlackElo "2617"]
[ECO "A00"]

1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 Bg4 3. c4 Nd7 4. Qb3 Rb8 5. h3 Bxf3 6. Qxf3 g6 7. e3 Bg7 8. Nc3 c5 9. d5 Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 Qa5 11. Qd1 b5 12. cxb5 Qxc3+ 13. Bd2 Qe5 14. Be2 Qxd5 15. O-O Ngf6 16. Bf3 Qe6 17. Qa4 O-O 18. Rab1 Ne5 19. Be2 Rb7 20. Rfc1 Rfb8 21. Qc2 Qf5 22. a4 a6 23. f4 Qxc2 24. Rxc2 Ned7 25. Ra1 axb5 26. Bxb5 Ra7 27. Be2 Ne4 28. Be1 d5 29. Bf3 f5 30. a5 c4 31. Bxe4 fxe4 32. Bc3 Nc5 33. Bd4 Rb5 34. a6 Rxa6 35. Rxa6 Nxa6 36. Ra2 Nc5 37. Ra8+ Kf7 38. Rh8 h5 39. Rh7+ Ke8 40. g4 hxg4 41. hxg4 Ne6 42. Be5 d4 43. Rh8+ Kd7 44. exd4 c3 45. d5 c2 46. dxe6+ Kxe6 47. Rc8 Rb1+ 48. Kf2 c1=Q 49. Rxc1 Rxc1 0-1

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777:

Marcel Peek (2354) - Varuzhan Akobian (2617)
Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2012

The Dutch IM is a 1.d4 player. Recently, GM Akobian often uses the flexible move 1...d6 leading to the Pribil (Czech System)/Wade Defense/English Rat complex.

1. d4 d6 2. Nf3 Bg4


click for larger view

The Wade Defense (Hodgson Variation) - the system championed by IM Robert Graham Wade, a British chess player, writer, arbiter,coach, and promoter (born 10 April 1921 Dunedin, New Zealand – died on 29 November 2008, London).

The idea is to develop the queenside first so that the queen's bishop doesn't remain blocked behind the pawn chain.

3. c4 Nd7 4. Qb3

According to Yrjolla and Tella (An Explosive Chess Opening for Black), this line is probably the biggest challenge for Black (the main alternative is 4.Nc3).

4... Rb8 5. h3 (the alternative is 5.g3) Bxf3 6. Qxf3 g6 7. e3 Bg7 8. Nc3 c5


click for larger view

The standard position in this line (8...c5 is the key move for Black).

9. d5 Bxc3+ 10. bxc3 Qa5


click for larger view

11. Qd1 (If 11.Bd2 then 11...Ngf6 12.Qd1 Ne4 played by Michael Adams) 11... b5 12. cxb5 Qxc3+ 13. Bd2 Qe5 14. Be2 Qxd5 15. O-O Ngf6


click for larger view

Black is slightly better. The game Mchedlishvili - Gagunashvili (Georgia Olympiad Selection, 2001) proceeded <16.Qc2> 0-0 17.Bc3 Qe6 18.Rfd1 d5

Peek opted for <16.Bf3> (better is 16.Bc3)

16. Bf3 Qe6 17. Qa4?! O-O 18. Rab1?! Ne5 19. Be2 Rb7 20. Rfc1 Rfb8 21. Qc2?! Qf5 ?! 22. a4 a6?!


click for larger view

The position is equal.

23. f4? That was White's key mistake in the game. Simply exchanging the queens (23.Qxf5) retains equality.

23... Qxc2 24. Rxc2 Ned7 25. Ra1 axb5 26. Bxb5 Ra7 27. Be2 Ne4 28. Be1 d5 29. Bf3 f5 30. a5 c4 31. Bxe4 fxe4 32. Bc3 Nc5 33. Bd4 Rb5 34. a6 Rxa6 35. Rxa6 Nxa6 36. Ra2 Nc5 37. Ra8+ Kf7 38. Rh8 h5 39. Rh7+ Ke8 40. g4 hxg4 41. hxg4 Ne6 42. Be5 d4 43. Rh8+ Kd7 44. exd4 c3 45. d5 c2 46. dxe6+ Kxe6 47. Rc8 Rb1+ 48. Kf2 c1=Q 49. Rxc1 Rxc1 0-1

Jan-25-12  karpkasp: <cro777> Do you know this book? A black repertoire based on Pribyl/czech/Wade defences.

http://www.amazon.com/1-d6-Move-Eve...

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: <karpkasp> I have ordered the book. It's on the way.
Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: In Round 2 GM Akobian split the point with IM Marc Tyler Arnold of United States (Saint Louis Chess Club).

At just 18-years-old Marc Arnold has earned a collection of chess titles, including the Cadet Championship (2006), the US Junior Championship (2007) the National Junior High School Championship (2007) and the International Master title (2009).

[Event "2012 Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival"]
[Site "Gibraltar"]
[Date "2012.01.25"]
[Round "2"]
[White "Akobian, Varuzhan"]
[Black "Arnold, Marc"]
[WhiteELO "2617"]
[BlackELO "2482"]

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 b5 5.Bf4 d6 6.dxe6 Bxe6 7.cxb5 a6 8.e4 Nxe4 9.Bd3 Nf6 10.O-O Be7 11.Ng5 Bg4 12.Qa4 Nbd7 13.bxa6 O-O 14.Nc3 d5 15.h3 Bh5 16.Qc2 Bg6 17.Bxg6 hxg6 18.Nf3 Rxa6 19.Nb5 Qb6 20.a4 Rc8 21.Rfe1 Bf8 22.Ne5 Nxe5 23.Bxe5 Nd7 24.Rad1 Qb7 25.b3 c4 26.Bd4 cxb3 27.Qxb3 Rc4 28.Ra1 Qa8 29.Red1 Raxa4 30.Nc7 Qc6 31.Rxa4 Rxa4 32.Nxd5 Ra3 33.Nb4 Qa4 1/2-1/2

Jan-25-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Varuzhan Akobian (2617) - Marc Arnold (2482)

Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2012

Against Akobian's 1.d4 Arnold chose (for surprise value) the Blumenfeld Counter Gambit . "The Blumenfeld is a state of mind. If you are in the right mood, it is a dangerous weapon". (Glenn Flear)

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 c5 4.d5 b5


click for larger view

Here, <5.dxe6> fxe6 6.cxb5 is Blumenfeld Gambit Accepted and <5.Bg5> is Blumenfeld Gambit Declined.

Akobian opted for <4.f4> (only the third most popular move).


click for larger view

After 4.f4 the main continuation is

5...exd5 6.cxd5 d6 (alternatives are 6...Bb7 and 6...Qa5+).

Arnold selected the road not taken (5...d6 and 6...Bxe6) and the game early went out of book.

5...d6 6.dxe6 Bxe6 7.cxb5 a6 8.e4 Nxe4 9.Bd3 Nf6 10.O-O Be7 11.Ng5 Bg4 12.Qa4 Nbd7 13.bxa6 O-O 14.Nc3 d5 15.h3 Bh5


click for larger view

Here Akobian missed a tactical possibility to gain advantage by playing <16.Nxh7> (instead he played 16.Qc2?!)

16.Nxh7 Nxh7 17.Nxd5 Ndf6 18.Nxe7 Qxe7 19.Rfe1


click for larger view

Jan-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: In Round 3 GM Akobian split the point with IM Irina Krush (2467), three times winner of the U.S. Women's Chess Championship (1998, 2007, and 2010).

Recently they had two encounters: at the U.S. Championship 2010 and the last year edition of the Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival.

Their game at the U.S. championship 2010 was a marathon, running to 113, and Akobian was fortunate to win. The opening was the Pribil (Czech) System (1. d4 d6 2. e4 Nf6 3. Nc3 c6). Krush had an advantage for much of the game and achieved a breakthrough in the endgame, which was enough for her to win. But she misplayed the position, first allowing Akobian to obtain a defensible position, and then a winning one.

At the Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2011 Akobian played wth the white pieces. The opening was the Ragozin Defense and the game ended in a draw. They fought to bare kings.

[Event "2012 Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival"]
[Date "2012.01.26"]
[Round "3"]
[White "Krush, Irina"]
[Black "Akobian, Varuzhan"]
[Result "1/2-1/2"]
[WhiteELO "2467"]
[BlackELO "2617"]

1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Bg4 3.e4 Nf6 4.h3 Bh5 5.Nc3 c6 6.Bd3 e6 7.d5 cxd5 8.exd5 e5 9.g4 Bg6 10.Nh4 Nbd7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Bd2 a6 13.Qe2 Nc5 14.O-O-O Be7 15.f4 Nfd7 16.Kb1 Qc7 17.g5 Nxd3 18.cxd3 b5 19.Ne4 Qb7 20.fxe5 Nxe5 21.Nxd6 Bxd6 22.d4 Qxd5 23.dxe5 Be7 24.Bb4 Qe6 25.Bxe7 Qxe7 26.h4 Rc8 27.Ka1 Rc4 28.Qf3 Qe6 29.a3 Qc6 30.Qd3 O-O 31.h5 gxh5 32.Rxh5 Rc1 33.Rxc1 Qxc1 34.Ka2 Qc4 35.Qxc4 bxc4 36.Rh4 Rc8 37.Kb1 c3 38.b4 Re8 39.Re4 Kh7 40.Kc2 Kg6 41.e6 f5 42.gxf6 Kxf6 43.Kxc3 Rxe6 44.Rxe6 Kxe6 45.Kd4 g5 46.Ke4 g4 47.a4 g3 48.Kf3 Kd5 49.Kxg3 Kc4 50.b5 axb5 51.axb5 Kxb5 1/2-1/2

Jan-26-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Irina Krush (2467) - Varuzhan Akobian (2617)

Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2012

In the Wade Defense Krush opted for the <3.e4> system. It leads to rather different types of position from the <3.c4> system which was played by Peek against Akobian in Round 1.

1.d4 d6 2.Nf3 Bg4 3.e4


click for larger view

"It is more like a semi-open system because generally White leaves the c-pawn on c2 and plays Nc3 early on". (Irjola and Tella, An Explosive Chess Opening Repertoire for Black).

3...Nf6 4.h3 Bh5 5.Nc3 c6 6.Bd3 e6


click for larger view

In the diagram position Giri played against Akobian <7.Bg5> , at the Corus Chess Tournament 2010 (Group B). The game was a marathon, running to 120. Akobian succeded in drawing a rook endgame.

Alternatives are <7.g4>, <7.Be3> and <7.Qe2>.

Krush chose a rare move <7.d5>.

7.d5 cxd5 8.exd5 e5 9.g4 Bg6


click for larger view

This position occurred before in only one game. At the XV Festival Internazionale 2008 (Campobasso, Italy), Urs Egli against FM Michelangelo Scalcione played <1o.Bb5+?!> and lost the game.

It seems that Krush was well prepared for this line. She quickly played <10.Nh4> (the alternative is 10.g5) but after <10...Nbd7> she took 22 minutes over her next move <11.Nxg6>.

10.Nh4 Nbd7 11.Nxg6 hxg6 12.Bd2 a6 13.Qe2 Nc5 14.O-O-O Be7 15.f4 Nfd7 16.Kb1 Qc7 17.g5 Nxd3 18.cxd3 b5 19.Ne4 Qb7


click for larger view

The critical position.

In a better position Krush was attracted by the combination (leading to an even endgame):

<20.fxe5?!> Nxe5 21.Nxd6 Bxd6 22.d4 Qxd5 23.dxe5 Be7 24.Bb4

Instead, <20.d4!> would have enhanced her winning chances.

20.d4 Qxd5 21.dxe5 dxe5 22.Bb4

Jan-27-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: In Round 4 GM Akobian won with white against Roberto Junio Brito Molina (2415) of Brazil (Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil).

Molina holds the title of International Master in chess and the Black Belt 1st Dan in Tae Kwon Do.

[Event "2012 Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival"]
[Date "2012.01.27"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Akobian, Varuzhan"]
[Black "Molina, Roberto"]
[WhiteELO "2617"]
[BlackELO "2415"]

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Bf4 Nf6 5.e3 O-O 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Qc2 c5 8.Rd1 cxd4 9.Rxd4 Qa5 10.Bg3 Nb6 11.Nd2 dxc4 12.Bxc4 Nxc4 13.Nxc4 Qa6 14.O-O Bd7 15.Rfd1 Bc6 16.Bd6 Bxd6 17.Nxd6 Bd5 18.Ndb5 Rac8 19.Qd2 Qb6 20.Na3 Qc5 21.e4 Bc6 22.b4 Qe7 23.e5 Nd5 24.Ne4 Nb6 25.Nd6 Rb8 26.Nac4 Nxc4 27.Rxc4 Bd5 28.Rd4 f6 29.f4 h6 30.Rxd5 exd5 31.Qxd5 Kh7 32.e6 f5 33.Nxf5 Qf6 34.Nd6 Rbd8 35.Qe4 Kg8 36.f5 Qe7 37.Qe5 g6 38.Rd3 Rf6 39.g4 Rff8 40.Nf7 Rxf7 41.exf7 1-0

Jan-28-12
Premium Chessgames Member
  cro777: Varuzhan Akobian (2617) - Roberto Molina (2415)

Tradewise Gibraltar Chess Festival 2012

In the Blackburn Variation of the Queen's Gambit Declined (White plays Bf4), the players followed the game Aronian - Radjabov from the 8th World Team Champioship 2011 in Ningbo, China. Akobian plays this variation with both colors. It is sometimes referred to as "boring but very solid".

1.d4 d5 2.c4 e6 3.Nc3 Be7 4.Bf4 Nf6 5.e3 O-O 6.Nf3 Nbd7 7.Qc2 c5 8.Rd1 cxd4 9.Rxd4 Qa5 10.Bg3 Nb6 11.Nd2 dxc4 12.Bxc4 Nxc4 13.Nxc4 Qa6 14.O-O Bd7 15.Rfd1 Bc6 16.Bd6 Bxd6 17.Nxd6 Bd5 18.Ndb5


click for larger view

In the game Aronian - Radjabov Black played <18...Qb6> and after

<18...Qb6> 19.e4 Bc6 20.Nd6 e5 21.R4d3 Rad8

the players soon agreed to a draw.

Molina chose <18...Rac8?!> and the game continued by

<18...Rac8> 19.Qd2 Qb6 20.Na3 Qc5 21.e4 Bc6 22.b4 Qe7 23.e5 Nd5 24.Ne4 Nb6 25.Nd6 Rb8 26.Nac4 Nxc4 27.Rxc4 Bd5 28.Rd4 f6 29.f4 h6


click for larger view

Akobian decided to sacrifice an exchange

30.Rxd5 exd5 31.Qxd5+ Kh7 32.e6


click for larger view

Here, Molina missed a chance to fully equalize the game by playing <32...Rfd8>. Instead, he played <32...f5?> which happened to be the decisive mistake.

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