chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
Chessgames.com User Profile Chessforum
sevenseaman
Member since May-16-10 · Last seen Dec-18-14
Of late I have been relatively inactive except solving chess puzzles. This now is largely my only source of keeping in touch with the game and endeavor to hone whatever little skill I have.

Chess remains my most mesmerizing interest.

http://www.caissa.com/chess-tools/p...

PGN Viewer: http://chesstempo.com/pgn-viewer.html

http://www.k4it.de/index.php?topic=...
Nalimov Tables

>> Click here to see sevenseaman's game collections.

Chessgames.com Full Member

   sevenseaman has kibitzed 5839 times to chessgames   [more...]
   Dec-17-14 Kramnik vs Nakamura, 2014 (replies)
 
sevenseaman: A Fri/ Thu puzzle setup at White move 39. First move will be found but not all the latter ones played by <KramniK>.
 
   Dec-11-14 McShane vs S Agdestein, 2014 (replies)
 
sevenseaman: Hi <Sally Simpson>. I salute you on the style of your comment and assure you that you have not 'let the cat out'. Yes it has to be a chess teacher's staple and I prefer to collude with you in not ruining the pleasure for future puzzle solvers. The problem came to me too ...
 
   Dec-10-14 Kramnik vs Caruana, 2014
 
sevenseaman: Sumo wrestling, eh!
 
   Dec-09-14 A Giri vs Nakamura, 2014
 
sevenseaman: Fascinating moves! Towards the end (26. on)
 
   Dec-09-14 Adams vs Nakamura, 2014
 
sevenseaman: Good comment <patzer2>! 42...Rb2+
 
   Dec-09-14 Anand vs Adams, 2014
 
sevenseaman: 56. Kc5! Big decision to mobilise the K to stop the 'a' pawn.
 
   Dec-09-14 sevenseaman chessforum
 
sevenseaman: 140162 Stopping the Pawns! [DIAGRAM] Black. White 1. Rxh1 How do you win with K and R against K and 2 Ps? Just one wrong move can be fatal. You can be sure you'll mess it up. So go to Nalimov!
 
   Dec-01-14 Morozevich vs B Grachev, 2014 (replies)
 
sevenseaman: This is quintessential <Moro>! What an attack oriented game! I might wish to model my game on this kind of game but I'd struggle to find moves like; 19. e5, 24. Bf6 27. f6 29 Rh4(timing) 31. Bxg6! 36. Be3 (timing, again) I know he out-elos <Grachev> but it is ...
 
   Nov-26-14 M A Tabatabaei vs R van Kampen, 2014
 
sevenseaman: Tug-of-war, you defend every inch.
 
   Nov-26-14 M Perunovic vs G Vazquez, 2014 (replies)
 
sevenseaman: Perunovic keeps mounting pressure to make d7 untenable.
 
(replies) indicates a reply to the comment.

A Close Call

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 82 OF 82 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-08-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 137647 Do not let your own momentum carry you too far.


click for larger view

White.
2. Qc6 is not an easy move to find! Sadly my move (very enthusiastic, I daresay) <2. Qb7> was only a draw(perpetual). Try.

Nov-10-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 78215 Poignancy of Thought translates into Beauty!

This is a small illustration of what interpretation 'beauty' takes in chess.


click for larger view

Black.

'd' and 'c' pawns are so juicily placed that average chess players will keep concentrating on a P promotion (I did). But it is much more complex.

1...Nd8 (I think now you will see what miracle has been wrought on the board by this move - Black threatens mate in 1) 2. Rf6 (White had no choice) Rc6 (normal attempt at deflection) 3. Kg5 (understandable)Kxg7 4.h6+ Kg8

Did you notice that 2...Nf7+? leads to only a draw. For 3.Rxf7 Kxf7 4.Bxd4! blocks both Black pawns for good.

What do you say about beauty in chess? Now I know why grandmasters have seemingly endless long thinks when not a fly stirs.

Nov-11-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: Hi <morf>! The score being a draw, a loss and a win, I get the feeling that Vishy is playing (every game) more aggressive than usual.

I of course like this welcome change, but the way I read it, it could be a planned style-change/strategy. It has rewards/pitfalls.

What do you say?

Nov-13-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <sevenseaman> Good evening! In the tournament pages leading up to the start, I took the position that deep and thorough preparation, a known Anand strength, would serve the ex-champ well. This appears to be the case. Take for example, after the disaster in game 3, Anand appeared well composed and hardly ruffled. This is evidence of excellent preparation. Despite the loss, Anand knew its just one game. I think going forward, the games will be bitterly fought with the title hanging in the balance. Lets see what else Anand has prepared
Nov-13-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Sorry, I meant game 2
Nov-15-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 102014 Its a tough cookie!


click for larger view

White.
I was quite excited about 'my solution'. I had it all sewn up;

1. Re6 fxe6 (or Black forfeits his Q) 2. exg6+ K~ 3. Q mates. But 1...Bd3+ ruins it all as it forces the White Q away.

It simply had to be;

1. g6+ fxg6 2. Re6 Nc3+ 3. Ka1 Qh1+ 4. Re1 Qc6 5. fxg6+ Qxg6 6. Qxc3 ...

Nov-19-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 101927 The Mind game!


click for larger view

White.
The point is not to allow Black to queen.

1. Rxh7+ Kg6 (coming up is understandable) 2. Kf3! (now proposing mate via 3. Rh5 and 4 Rh4#) Rxc3+ (queening was a luxury) 3. Nxc3

Nov-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 78406 Perfection can be quite simple!


click for larger view

Black.

1...g4 2. Re1 Qf3+ 3. Kg1 Rf5 and White has only Hobson's choice? 4. Rxe5 Qxc6

Nov-20-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 90086 A pricey technique worth remembering.


click for larger view

White

1. f6+ Kg6 2. Rxf8 b2 3. Be3 Rc1 4. Rg1+ Rxg1 5. Rg8+ K~ 6. Rxg1

Nov-24-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 106429 Castle!


click for larger view

White.

That Black can still castle is a big factor in the solution.

Nov-25-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: <sevenseaman> From a preparation standpoint, it was what I expected: Anand was super prepared, perhaps too much to the point that he was so focused with his own plans, he overlooked simple strong forcing continuations. For example, in Game 2, 34...Qd2 just had to be played. 34...h5 was just awful

And in game 6, Anand overlooked 26...Nxe5 failing to take advantage of the one clear blunder made by Carlsen during the match, namely 26.Kd2

Condensed down, we can say Anand came within two moves of completely changing the character of the match. Thats not to bad, all things considered

*****

Nov-27-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 127313 Miracles can be wrought!


click for larger view

White.

I was so close to the idea but I lost via 1. Bf5+!

See if you can better my effort.

Nov-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 79376 The Logical Indian - 1


click for larger view

White.
1. Nf6 (to prepare Re8#)2...Rxd6 (averts mate) 2. Re2 (attacks the N but more importantly prepares the fork Ne8+) Rd1 or ~, N is doomed 4. Rxb2

93361 The Logical Indian - 2


click for larger view

Black.
1...Rd1+ 2. Kh2 d3 3. Nf5 d2 4. Ne3 Re1 5. Rxd2 Bxe3 (Till now the B was pinned on a/c of Rxh6#)

Nov-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 43468 In chess to go on giving checks is not the aim.


click for larger view

Black.

1...Rxd3 2. Qxb4 Rd1+ 3. Kh2 Rh1+ 4. Kg3 Rg1+ 5. Kf2 (Now not Rg2+ for the heck of it, but Nxd3+ to take the Q while losing the R).

Nov-28-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 77793 <<<Powerful Analysis!>>>


click for larger view

Black.
The human mind can analyze like an engine too; because an engine is only an extension of the human mind. Perhaps the difference is that in making of an engine many human minds may have optimized it. I illustrate;
Black Q is hanging but1...Bg4+ is White's death knell. How? 2. Kxg4 Qe2+ 3. Kh3 ( 3. Kg3 Bxf2+ 4. Kh3 Qh5# ) ( 3. f3 Qxg2+ 4. Kh4 Bf2# ) Qh5+ 4. Kg3 Qg5+ 5. Kf3 ( 5. Kh3 Qf5+ 6. Kh4 ( 6. Kg3 Bxf2# ) ( 6. g4 Qf3+ 7. Kh4 Bxf2# ) Bxf2+ 7. g3 Qh5# ) Qf4+ 6. Ke2 Qxf2+ 7. Kd3 e4#

So White plays 1.Kg3. And now Qxb7 is good because of White's priority of having to retake. And the follow-up is 2. Rxb7 Bxd1 <<<(cheers)>>>.

Nov-29-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 79942. Once the Juggernaut starts!


click for larger view

Black. To set it in motion is all the problem!

!...Kg8 (no other +)2. Nf4 (threatens the B) but now 2...axb3 (threatens Ra2+) 3. axb3 Bb1 (Masterly, threatens Qc2#) 4. Rxb1 Qxe3 (else no way to get to c3) 5. Kc2 (what else?) Ra2+ 6. Rb2 Qc3+ 7. Kd1 Ra1+ 8. Ke2 Re1 (the Juggernaut stars, no escape)

Dec-02-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 71926 Was Anand ever brilliant?
(Versus Karjakin, Corus 2006)


click for larger view

Black <Anand>

1... Qa5+ 2. Kd4( Kd3 2...Qb5+ 3. Kd4) Ra4+ 3. Kd3 Qb5+ 4. Kc3 Qc4+ 5. Kd2 Ra2+ 6. Ke1 Qe2#

Dec-04-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 102517 The Unsolvable!


click for larger view

Black.
There is no normal way of solving this problem. I tried every clever trick and it failed. Then I went to an engine. It gave me 1...Nxf5. It looked a good move that stopped my Q from hanging and attacked the opposing Q.

Toga II (Chesstempo analyzer)said, 'a good move but not my first choice; keep looking'!

And I kept looking...

Tried Nb3... no good. Its a great problem (and it grates).

Can you find the first move? Its a very difficult ask but if you do that, 90% of the solution comes within reach!

Dec-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  OhioChessFan: 127313 is an unusual case where a King is skewered. At first, I thought White just wanted a draw with 1. Qg8+
Dec-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: 102517

-Qxc1.QxQ
-Rc8 is the key, with the deadly threat Nb3
hence Bd1,but then cxd1+,Qxd1 and Rc1,followed by Ne2+ winnning the game.

A good exercise.

Dec-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: <Moronovic> In 102517 my first idea was same as yours. Its quite good but it does not work quite so well as the solution. What happens is;

1... Qxc1+ 2. Qxc1 Rc8 3. Kg2 Nb3 4. Qb2 c1=Q 5. isn't enough (-1.00 eval after 4...Qxb3 )

The sol is simpler and decisive;

1... Qxe3 2. fxe3 Rb8 3. Kf2 Rb1 4. Rxc2 Nxc2

or

1...Qxe3 2. fxe3 Rb8 3. Kf2 Rb1 4. Rxc2 Nxc2 5. Bf3 Rb2 6. Be2 Ra2 7. h3 Rxa4 8. Bd3 Nb4 9. Bc4

I think you'll see the point.

Dec-05-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: <OhioChessFan> You have a reasonable view.The sol to 127313 is;

1. Bh5+ Kg5 2. Qxe5 Kh4 3. Nxf3+ Qxf3 4. Bxf3 winning.

Also;
1. Bh5+ Qxh5 2. Qg8+ Kf6 3. Qxg1 Qh3+ 4. Kc2 Qa3 5. Nb3 Qa2+ 6. Kc3 Qa7 7. d6 Qd7 8. Qxc5

Dec-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  moronovich: <I think you'll see the point.>

Yes,I see now.Thanks.Guess I was seduced by the "insolvable";)Quite often a dry and technical solution is the answer.

Dec-06-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 88362 Deep tactics.


click for larger view

Black.

I did not get the first move. So didn't a famous World champion. Will you?

Even the 2nd and 3rd are tough but if you get the first, you surely will have the picture for those to come.

Dec-09-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  sevenseaman: 140162 Stopping the Pawns!


click for larger view

Black. White 1. Rxh1
How do you win with K and R against K and 2 Ps?

Just one wrong move can be fatal. You can be sure you'll mess it up.

So go to Nalimov!

Jump to page #   (enter # from 1 to 82)
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 82 OF 82 ·  Later Kibitzing>

Take the Premium Membership Tour
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, totally anonymous, and 100% free--plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, or profane language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, or duplicating posts.
  3. No personal attacks against other users.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform an administrator.


NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific user and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, you might try the Kibitzer's Café.
Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors.

You are not logged in to chessgames.com.
If you need an account, register now;
it's quick, anonymous, and free!
If you already have an account, click here to sign-in.

View another user profile:
  


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | advertising | contact us
Copyright 2001-2014, Chessgames Services LLC
Web design & database development by 20/20 Technologies