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Annotations v.07: Misc. II
Compiled by chessmoron
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<Gausdal Classics GM-group A (2007) >

#1: <1 d4 d5 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 Nf6 4 g3 dxc4 5 Bg2 Nbd7 6 0-0!?> The 16-year old phenom dares the 70-year old legend to keep the pawn. White could recover it with 6 Qa4. <6Rb8 7 Qc2 b5 8 b3 cxb3> Worth a thought is 8Bb7!? 9 bxc4 Be4. <9 axb3 a6 10 Ne5 Nxe5 11 dxe5 Nd5> Not 11Nd7? 12 Bc6 Bb7 because 13 Be3! Bxc6 14 Qxc6 keeps Black pinned. <12 Rd1 Qe7> Plausible, as is 12Bd7 13 Bd2 Qc8. <13 Nc3 Qc5 14 Rxd5!?> Enterprising speculation. White could get an edge from 14 Bxd5 exd5 15 Be3 Qc6 16 Rac1 Be6 17 Nxd5. <14exd5 15 b4 Qxb4> To meet 16 Nxd5 with 16Qc4. Riskier is 15Qd4 16 Be3 Qxe5 because 17 Bf4 Qf5 18 e4 gives White an ominous lead in development. <16 Ba3 Qg4?> Now Black will suffer, despite his extra material. It's doubtful if White has enough compensation after 16Qd4! 17 Rd1 Qxe5 18 Bxf8 Kxf8 19 Nxd5 Bg4, as 20 Qc5+ Qd6 is harmless. <17 Bxf8 Kxf8 18 Nxd5> Threatening 19 Qc5+. <18Qc4> Also 18Qd4 19 Rd1 Qxe5 20 Qc5+ Qd6 21 Qa7 favors White. <19 Qd2 Be6 20 Rc1 Qb3> There is no salvation in 20Bxd5, as 21 Bxd5! Qg4 22 Rxc7 continues the attack. <21 Nxc7 Kg8 22 Qd6> Still pursuing the King. White could wipe out the Queenside by 22 Nxa6 Rf8 23 Bc6. <22Rc8 23 Bb7 h6!> Toughest. After 23Rf8 24 Bd5!, White imagines 24Bxd5 25 Nxd5 h5 26 Qxf8+! Kxf8 27 Rc8 mate or 24Qb2 25 Nxe6! Qxc1+ 26 Kg2 Qc8 27 Nxf8 Qxf8 28 Qd7, followed by e5-e6-e7. <24 Bxc8 Bxc8 25 Nxb5 axb5 26 Rxc8+ Kh7 27 Rc1> The b-pawn would provide plenty of counterplay if Rooks were exchanged. <27Re8 28 Kg2 Kg8 29 Rc5 Qa2?!> Dropping a second pawn. Probably White can make progress anyway after 29b4 30 e4, but it's not easy. <30 Qc6, 1-0.> White parries 30Rd8 31 Qxb5 Rd2 by 32 Rc8+ Kh7 33 Rf8 Rxe2 34 Qd3+ g6 35 Qf3, when 35Kg7 36 Re8! Qa6 permits 37 Qf6+! Qxf6 38 exf6+ Kxf6 39 Rxe2.

<Kramnik - Aronian Rapid Match (2007) >

#2: <1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6 5 0-0 Be7 6 Re1 b5 7 Bb3 0-0 8 c3 d5!? 9 exd5 Nxd5 10 Nxe5 Nxe5 11 Rxe5 c6 12 d4 Bd6 13 Re1 Qh4 14 g3 Qh3 15 Be3 Bg4 16 Qd3 Rae8 17 Nd2 Re6 18 Qf1>. The old Usually White prefers a2-a4 here or on the next move. <18Qh5 19 f3!?> New. <19Nxe3> Not bad. If Aronian had more than 25 minutes for the entire game, though, he might find the route to equality with 19 ... Rxe3 20 Rxe3 Nxe3 21 Qf2 Bxf3! 22 Qxf3 Qxf3 23 Nxf3 c5. <20 Qf2 Nd5> Now 20 ... Bxf3 21 Bxe6! Nc2 22 Qxf3 favors White, slightly. <21 fxg4 Qxg4 22 Qf3> Kramnik's goal is an endgame where Black has vulnerable pawns. For example, 22 ... Qxf3 23 Nxf3 Rfe8 24 Rxe6 Rxe6 25 c4! bxc4 26 Bxc4 a5 27 Rc1 sets up Bc4-b3-a4. <22Qg5 23 Rxe6 fxe6 24 Ne4 Qg6> Black drops material by 24 ... Rxf3? 25 Nxg5, as 25 ... Rf6 26 Ne4 and 25 ... Re3 26 Kf2 embarrass the Rook. <25 Qe2 Nf4?!> Black gets adequate counterplay from 25 ... Bf4! 26 Kh1 Be3 27 Bc2 Qf5. <26 Qc2 Nh3+?> Necessary is the uncomfortable 26 ... Be7 27 Re1 Nd5. <27 Kg2> Avoiding 27 Kh1?? Qxe4+! 28 Qxe4 Nf2+. <Qg4 28 Bxe6+!> Neatly simplifying. <28Qxe6 29 Qb3 Nf4+ 30 gxf4 Qxb3 31 axb3 Bxf4 32 Rxa6> White emerges with an extra b-pawn. His active Rook and mobile Knight will team up to attack c6, clinching victory. <32Rc8 33 Nc5 Kf7> Even the sturdier 33 ... Bg5 34 Nd3 Bf6 won't hold out long after 35 Kf3. <34 Nd3 g5 35 Nxf4 gxf4 36 Kf3 Ke6 37 Kxf4 Kd6> If 37 ... Kd5 38 Ke3 Rf8, White pushes him back by 39 c4+ bxc4 40 Ra5+. <38 c4 Rf8+ 39 Ke3 Kc7 40 Ra7+ Kb6 41 Rxh7 Rf1 42 Rh6 Kb7> Or 42 ... Rb1 43 d5. <43 Rh5 Rb1 44 Kd3! bxc4+ 45 Kc2, 1-0.>

<Russian Team Championship (2007) >

#3: <1 d4 Nf6 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Bg7 4 g3 0-0 5 Bg2 d6 6 0-0 Nbd7 7 Nc3 e5 8 e4 a6> The modern treatment, aiming for b7-b5. <9 Re1 c6> Less common than 9Rb8 or 9exd4. <10 b3 b5 11 cxb5 axb5 12 Bb2 Bb7 13 dxe5 Nxe5 14 Nxe5 dxe5 15 Qc2 Qb6 16 a4> White has the edge. He hopes to occupy c4 (after 16b4 17 Nd1 Nd7 18 Ne3) or c5 (after 16bxa4?! 17 Nxa4). <16Rfd8 17 Bf1 Bh6! 18 Rad1 Qc5! 19 Qe2 b4> Excessive optimism? Black could equalize with 19Qb4 20 axb5 Qxb3. <20 Nb1 Nd7 21 Qf3 Qe7 22 Nd2 Nc5 23 Nc4> Success! The a-pawn is obviously much more valuable than the c-pawn. <23f6 24 Nb6 Rxd1 25 Rxd1 Rd8 26 a5 Kg7 27 h4 Rd6 28 Ra1 Na6 29 Bc4 Qc7 30 h5> To make further progress, White needs a second front. <30Nc5 31 Na4!?> Setting the trap 31Qxa5? 32 Bxe5. <31Nd7 32 Nb6 Nc5> Black would land in an unbreakable pin by 32Nxb6 33 axb6 Qd7 (not 33Qxb6? 34 Bxe5) 34 Ra7 c5 35 Bd5 Rxb6 36 Qd1. <33 hxg6 hxg6 34 Kg2 Bg5 35 Rh1> Threatening Qf3-g4-h3. <35Rd8 36 Qg4 Qb8> White refutes 36Bc8 beautifully by 37 Nxc8 Qxc8 38 Qxg5! fxg5 39 Bxe5+ Kf8 40 Bf6 Ne6 41 Rh8+ Kf7 42 Rxd8 Qc7 43 e5, intending 44 Rd6. <37 Bc1?!> Unconvincing. Nor does 37 f4?! Rd2+ 38 Kf3 clinch a win, as the computer reveals the defense 38Qd6! 39 fxg5 fxg5 40 Qxg5 Qf8+ 41 Qf4 Qxf4+ 42 gxf4 Rxb2. But 37 Qh3 Rh8 38 Qxh8+ Qxh8 39 Rxh8 Kxh8 40 f4! exf4 41 gxf4 Bxf4 42 Bxf6+ Kh7 43 e5 should win, as Black will have to give up a piece for one of the passers. <37Bxc1 38 Rxc1 Rd4?> The right way is 38Qd6! 39 Rh1 Qd4, when 40 Qh3 Qxe4+ 41 Kg1 Qe1+ 42 Bf1 Rd2 gives Black sufficient counterplay. <39 Rh1!> This time, White's attack is decisive. <39Rd8> Hoping for 40 Qh3 Rh8. <40 Na4!> As 40Nxa4 41 Qh3! Rh8 42 Qd7+ mates. The more spectacular 40 Nd7! wins Black's Queen, because 40Nxd7 41 Qe6 and 40Rxd7 41 Qh4 f5 42 exf5 lead to mate. <40Nxe4 41 Qh3 f5 42 Qh7+ Kf6> Now 43 Qf7+ Kg5 44 Rh5+! is quickest, but White chooses a routine win. <43 Rh6, 1-0.>

<US Championship (2007) >

#4: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 e6 6 g4. h6 7 h3 a6 8 Bg2 Qc7 9 f4 b5> Not fearing 10 e5 Bb7. <10 0-0 Bb7 11 g5!? hxg5> The alternative 11 ... b4 12 gxf6 bxc3 13 f5 e5 14 fxg7 Bxg7 15 f6 Bf8 16 Nf5 Rg8 17 Qf3 should favor White. <12 fxg5 b4!> Sharpest, although 12 ... Nfd7 13 g6 Nf6 is playable. <13 Nd5! Nxd5?> Only 13 ... exd5 14 gxf6 dxe4 resists. Then 15 Qg4 gxf6 16 Bxe4 Nd7 leaves both Kings vulnerable. <14 exd5 e5> Probably expecting 15 Nf5 g6. <15 g6!> The second Knight offer wins. <15Qc5> No better is 15 ... exd4 16 Rxf7 Be7 17 Bg5, while 15 ... f6 and 15 ... fxg6 lead to agony after 16 Ne6. <16 Be3 exd4 17 Bxd4 Qb5 18 a4!> Foreseeing 18 ... bxa3 19 Qe1+ Kd8 20 c4! Qd7 21 Bb6+ Kc8 22 Rxf7. Nor will 19 ... Be7 20 Rxf7 Qd7 save Black, as 21 Rxa3 heads for e3 or f3. <18Qa5 19 Qe2+ Kd8 20 Rxf7 Nd7 21 Qe3> Preparing Ra1-e1 while preventing 21 ... Ne5 because of 22 Bb6+. <21b3 22 c3 Rc8 23 Re1 Kc7 24 Bb6+! Qxb6 25 Rxd7+, 1-0.>

#5: <1 e4 c6 2 d4 d5 3 Nd2 dxe4 4 Nxe4 Bf5 5 Ng3 Bg6 6 h4 h6 7 Nf3 e6> Tempting 8 Ne5, but White proceeds as usual. <8 h5 Bh7 9 Bd3 Bxd3 10 Qxd3 Nf6 11 Bf4> Less explored than 11 Bd2 Nbd7. <11Bb4+ 12 c3 Bd6 13 Ne5 0-0 14 0-0-0 Nbd7 15 Ne4 Nxe4> Natural, but 15Nxe5!? 16 dxe5 Bxe5 17 Bxe5 Qxd3 is an interesting pawn grab. White gets fair compensation from either 18 Nxf6+ gxf6 19 Rxd3 fxe5 20 Rd7 or 18 Rxd3 Nxe4 19 Re1! (inviting 19Nxf2? 20 Rg3). <16 Qxe4 Qc7 17 Kb1> Preventing 17c5 because 18 Nxd7 Bxf4 (no longer check!) 19 Nxf8 gains material. <17Rad8 18 g4!> Thematic and very powerful. Black has no answer to g4-g5, opening a file for attack. <18Nf6> After 18Nxe5 19 dxe5 Be7 20 Rdg1, White still enforces g4-g5. <19 Qe2 Nd5 20 Bd2 c5 21 g5! cxd4> If 21hxg5, most accurate appears 22 h6! g6 23 Bxg5, seeing 23f6 24 h7+ Kh8 25 Nxg6+ and 23Rc8 24 h7+ Kh8 25 Qf3. <22 cxd4 hxg5 23 Bxg5 Be7> Now White refutes 23f6 by 24 Rc1! Qb8 25 Ng6 fxg5 26 Qxe6+ Rf7 27 h6! or 24Qa5 25 h6! (not convincing is 25 Nc4? Nf4! 26 Bxf4 Qf5+) fxe5 26 fxg7 Rfe8 27 Qh5. <24 Rdg1 Qb6 25 Qd2> Stopping 25Nc3+ while setting up 26 Bh6. <25f6> Other finishes include 25Bf6 26 Bxf6 Nxf6 27 Qh6 Ne8 28 Rxg7+ Nxg7 29 Rg1; 25Kh8 26 Bh6 Bf6 27 Bxg7+! Bxg7 28 Qg5; and 25Kh7 26 Qd3+ f5 27 Bxe7 Nxe7 28 Qg3 Rg8 29 Qg6+! Nxg6 30 hxg6 mate. <26 h6!> Imagining 26fxg5 27 h7+ Kh8 28 Ng6 mate. <26fxe5 27 Bxe7 Nxe7 28 Rxg7+ Kh8 29 Qg5!, Black Resigns.> An impressive rout of a former U.S. champion.

#6: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Nc6 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 Be7 8 0-0-0 0-0 9 f4 h6 10 Bh4 Nxd4 11 Qxd4 a6> Less common than 11 ... Qa5. One point is that 12 Be2 Nxe4! 13 Bxe7?! Nxc3 favors Black. <12 Bd3> Reasonable. Theory concentrates on 12 g4!? Nxg4 13 Bxe7 Qxe7 14 Qxd6. <12Qc7 13 e5 dxe5 14 fxe5 Rd8 15 Qf4 Nd5 16 Nxd5 Rxd5!?> Trying to prove that e5 is weak. The safer 16 ... exd5 clears e6 for the Bishop, equalizing. <17 Bxe7 Qxe7 18 h4 Bd7 19 Qe4> White would welcome 19 c4!? Qc5! 20 Rhf1 Be8 21 Qe4 g6?! 22 h5 Rxe5 23 Qxb7, but Black escapes with the cold-blooded 21 ... Kf8! 22 Qh7 b5 23 Qh8+ Ke7 24 Qxg7 Qe3+ 25 Kc2 Qxe5. <19g6 20 h5 Qg5+ 21 Rd2?!> Allowing an unexpectedly swift counterattack. The drawish 21 Kb1 Bc6 22 hxg6 fxg6 23 Qxg6+ Qxg6 24 Bxg6 Rxe5 is the logical outcome. <21Bb5! 22 hxg6> Very dangerous. White should brave the complications of 22 c4 Rxe5 23 Qxb7 Rd8, as 24 hxg6 fxg6 25 cxb5 Rxd3 26 Qb8+ Kg7 27 Qxe5+ (not 27 Qc7+? Kf6 28 Rf1+ Rf5) Qxe5 28 Rxd3 reaches a defensible endgame. <22Bxd3 23 gxf7+ Kf8 24 cxd3 Rc8+ 25 Kd1 Rdc5!> White would not mind 25 ... Rxe5?! 26 Qh4. <26 Rh4?> Losing. White hangs on with 26 g4! Rc1+ 27 Ke2 Rxh1 28 Qxh1 Qxg4+ 29 Qf3. <26Rc1+ 27 Ke2 Qg3! 28 Qb4+ R8c5> Avoiding 28 ... Kxf7?? 29 Rf4+ Kg8 30 Rg4+. <29 Rd1 Qxg2+ 30 Ke3 Qg3+ 31 Ke2 a5! 32 Qg4> Or 32 Qa3 R1c2+ 33 Rd2 Qg2+. <R5c2+, 1-0.>

<National Open (2007) >

#7: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 e5 6 Ndb5 d6 7 Bg5 a6 8 Na3 b5 The 9 Bxf6 gxf6> Black must avoid 9Qxf6? 10 Nd5 Qd8 11 c4 b4 12 Qa4. <10 Nd5 f5 11 c3> Welcoming 11fxe4? 12 Bxb5! axb5 13 Nxb5, with too many threats. <11Bg7 12 g3> New. Usual is 12 exf5 or 12 Bd3. <12h5?> The U.S. champion overreacts. He should settle for 12fxe4 13 Bg2 0-0 14 Bxe4 f5, equalizing. Note that 13f5 14 Qh5+ Kf8 15 f3! exf3 16 Bxf3 Be6 17 Rf1 gives White a dangerous initiative. <13 Bg2> Intending simply 14 exf5 Bxf5 15 Ne3. <13f4> Aiming for confusion. The natural 13fxe4 14 Bxe4 Bg4 15 Bf3 Bxf3 16 Qxf3 Rc8 17 Nc2 leaves White in command of the light squares. <14 Nc2 Kf8> Maybe 14h4 15 gxf4 exf4 16 Nxf4 Be5 gives Black a bit of compensation. <15 Qe2> An intuitive decision. Khachiyan prefers development to the pawn grab. <15Qg5 16 Bf3 Rb8> If Black eliminates his vulnerable Kingside pawns by 16fxg3 17 hxg3 h4 18 gxh4 Rxh4 19 Rxh4 Qxh4, White targets the Queenside by 20 Nb6 Rb8 21 Nxc8 Rxc8 22 a4. <17 h4 Qh6 18 0-0-0!?> This bold choice will be rewarded. Of course, 18 gxf4 is also promising. <18fxg3+ 19 Kb1 gxf2 20 Qxf2 a5 21 a3> White's King is much safer than Black's. The extra pawn means little. <21Be6 22 Rhg1 Rb7?> Correct is 22Bf6 23 Nce3 (not 23 Bxh5? Bd8, as the Bishop emerges at b6) Bd8. <23 Rg5! Bxd5 24 exd5 Ne7 25 Bxh5?!> White's only slip. After 25 Rdg1 Rg8 26 Bxh5, Black cannot hold out long. <25Qf6?!> Reasonable, but 25Bf6! 26 Rf1 Nxd5 survives, precariously. Because 27 Rf5 Nf4 and 27 Bf3 Bxg5 28 hxg5 Qe6 don't worry Black, the critical variation is 27 Qf3 Bxg5 28 Qxd5 Qxh5 29 Qxb7 Bf4 30 Qxb5 Qxh4 unclear. <26 Qg2 Bh6 27 Rf1 Bxg5! 28 hxg5! Qxf1+> Worse is 28Qg7 29 Rxf7+. <29 Qxf1 Rxh5 30 Qf6> Black has enough material, but the agile Queen will outplay the Rooks. <30Rd7> Not 30Nxd5? 31 Qf3 or 30Rb6? 31 g6! Nxg6 32 Qd8+. <31 Ne3 Rh7 32 Ka2 Ke8> Perhaps 32Rg7 improves. <33 Qf1 Rb7 34 Nf5!> As 34Nxf5? 35 Qxf5 threatens 36 Qc8+. <34Rd7> If 34Nc8, White invades with 35 a4! bxa4 36 Qa6. <35 Ng3 b4> Trickier is 35Nxd5 36 Qxb5 Nc7, but 37 Qxa5 d5 (or 37Rg7 38 Ne4) 38 Qb6 should win. <36 Ne4 Ng8 37 Qb5 Ke7 38 Nf6!> Efficiently simplifying. <38Nxf6 39 gxf6+ Ke8 40 Qb8+ Rd8 41 Qc7 Rd7 42 Qc8+ Rd8 43 Qc6+ Rd7> White refutes 43Kf8 44 Qc7 Re8 45 Qxd6+ Kg8 46 cxb4 e4 neatly by 47 Qe7!. <44 cxb4 axb4 45 axb4 Rh4> After 45e4 46 b5, White will promote with mate. <46 b5 Ra4+ 47 Kb3 Ra5> No better is 47Raa7 48 b6 Rab7 49 Qc8+ Rd8 50 Qxb7. <48 b6, 1-0.> He does not want to see 48Rc5 49 b7 Rxc6 50 dxc6 Rd8 51 c7.

<Deep Fritz - Deep Junior (2007) >

#8: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 g6 3 Nc3 d5 4 cxd5 Nxd5 5 e4 Nxc3 6 bxc3 Bg7 7 Nf3 c5 8 Rb1 0-0 9 Be2 Nc6 10 d5 Ne5> Very dangerous is 10Bxc3+ 11 Bd2, as White will follow with h2-h4-h5. <11 Nxe5 Bxe5 12 Qd2 e6 13 f4> Thematic. White wants to control the center with pawns, while Black tries to confuse the issue with odd tactics. <13Bc7> Preventing c3-c4. <14 0-0 exd5 15 exd5 Ba5 16 f5!? Bxf5 17 Rxb7 Qd6 18 Bc4 Qe5 19 Rf3 Rab8!?> Strange. Why not 19Rfb8? <20 Rxa7 Bb6 21 Ra4 Bc7 22 g3 Rb1> A murky position, very difficult for computers or humans! White may have the edge, but his exposed King means that he cannot afford a single misjudgment. <23 Re3 Qf6 24 Ra6 Bd6 25 Re1 Rfb8 26 Bf1 h5 27 a4 c4!? 28 Rc6 Ra1 29 Bxc4?!> It's uncertain if Black has enough compensation after 29 Rxc4. <29Bd7 30 Rf1!> White cannot recover after 30 Ra6? Bc5+ 31 Kg2 Qf5: 32 a5 h4! 33 gxh4 Rxc1! 34 Rxc1 Qe4+, or 32 Qf4 Rb2+! 33 Bxb2 Qh3+ 34 Kf3 Bg4+. <30Qe7 31 Rxd6!?> Not bad, although repeating moves by 31 Re1 Qf6 32 Rf1 was more prudent. <31Qxd6 32 Qf2> White cannot lose after 32 Qf4 Qxf4 33 Bxf4 Rbb1 34 Rxb1 Rxb1+ 35 Kf2 Bxa4 36 Ke3. <32Qb6 33 Bf4?> At last, the advantage tips to Black. With 33 Be3 Rxf1+ 34 Bxf1 Qb1 35 Qf6, White forces 35Bh3 36 Bd4 Qxf1+ 37 Qxf1 Bxf1 38 Kxf1. Black can pick off one passer by 38f5 39 a5 Rb5, but 40 a6 Rxd5 41 a7 Ra5 42 Ke2 should draw easily. <33Qxf2+ 34 Kxf2 Rb2+ 35 Ke3 Rxa4> Inviting 36 Be2?? Rxe2+ or 36 Kd3?? Rxc4. <36 Bd3 Rxh2 37 c4> White retains hopes of drawing because of his powerful passers. <37Ra3 38 Kd4 h4! 39 g4!> Not 39 gxh4?? Rxh4 (threatening 40g5) 40 Be4 because 40f5 41 Bc2 g5 wins a piece. Also 39 c5?? Rxd3+ is fatal. <39Rh3 40 Be2 Rhb3 41 Ke5?> Machines lack the sense of desperation. The "human" move 41 c5 could lead to a drawn ending by 41Ra4+ 42 Ke5 Rbb4 43 c6 Re4+ 44 Kd6 Bxc6 45 dxc6 Rxe2 46 c7 Rc2 47 Kd7 Rd4+ 48 Bd6 Rxg4 49 c8Q+ Rxc8 50 Kxc8, while the tempting 41Ra2 42 Bd1 Rb1 43 c6 Bxg4 might even lose to 44 d6 Raa1 45 Bxg4 Rxf1 46 c7. <41Rb2 42 Re1 Raa2 43 Bd1 Ra6!> Restraining the pawns, as 44 c5? loses to 44f6+ 45 Ke4 Rb4+ 46 Kf3 Ra3+ 47 Re3 Bxg4+! 48 Kxg4 Rxe3. <44 Bc1?! Rb8 45 Rg1 h3 46 Rh1 f6+ 47 Kd4 Ra1 48 Bc2> Also hopeless is 48 Bf4 Rbb1. <48g5 49 c5 Bxg4 50 c6 Kf7 51 Rf1> Now 51 d6 Ra6! defangs the pawns: 52 c7 Rbb6, or 52 Be4 Ra4+! 53 Kd3 Rd8 54 d7 Bxd7 55 cxd7 Rxd7+ 56 Ke3 Re8. <51Rh8 52 d6 h2 53 d7> White loses too much material after 53 Rh1 Bf3 54 c7 Bxh1 55 d7 Raa8 or 53 Be4 Ra4+ 54 Kd3 Rh3+ 55 Be3 Ra3+. <53Ke7 54 Rh1, and 0-1.>

<Gorenje 2007 Tournament (2007) >

#9: <1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 dxe4 4 Nxe4 Bd7 5 Nf3 Bc6 6 Bd3 Nd7 7 0-0 Ngf6 8 Ng3 Be7 9 Re1 0-0 10 Qe2 b6> White will thwart Black's plan of 11 ... Bb7 and 12 ... c5. Instead, Black should seek counterplay with 10 ... Bxf3 11 Qxf3 c5, as suggested by Psakhis. <11 Ba6> Now 11 ... Bxf3 12 Qxf3 c5 drops the exchange to 13 Bb7 Rb8 14 Bf4. Maybe Black should rearrange his pieces by 11 ... Nb8!? 12 Ne5 Bd5 13 Bd3 Bb7, as 14 c3 c5 looks "normal." <11Rb8 12 c4 Bb7?> Also uncomfortable is 12 ... Ba8?! 13 Bf4. Black must resort to 12 ... Re8. <13 Bxb7 Rxb7 14 Ne5?!> Did Karpov realize that 14 d5! Bb4 15 dxe6 wins a pawn, as 15 ... Bxe1? 16 e7 is lethal? <14Qc8?> Justifying Karpov's choice. Nor does 14 ... c5? 15 Nc6 Qe8 help, because 16 Nf5! wins. But 14 ... Nxe5 15 dxe5 Nd7 16 Qg4 Kh8 would minimize White's edge. <15 Nc6> Burying the Rook at b7. <15Re8 16 Bg5> Preventing 16 ... Nb8, as 17 Nxe7+ Rxe7 18 Bxf6 gxf6 19 Nf5! gains the exchange. <16Bf8 17 Bxf6 Nxf6> Eliminating the Knight by 17 ... gxf6 18 Rad1 Nb8 19 Nxb8 Rxb8 won't save Black. White replies 20 Nh5 Qd8 21 d5!, anticipating 21 ... Qe7 22 Qf3 f5 23 dxe6 fxe6 24 Rd7! Qg5 25 Qg3! Qxg3 26 Nf6+ Kh8 27 Rxh7 mate. <18 Nh5 Nd7> Black needs his Knight to challenge the monster at c6. He lasts longer with 18 ... Nxh5 19 Qxh5 Qd7 20 Qf3, but he can never free his Rook. <19 Qg4 Kh8 20 Re3! Nb8> Aiding White's attack. But 20 ... g6 21 Nf4 Nb8 also fails, to 22 Ne5 c6 23 Rh3 (threatening 24 Nxf7+ Rxf7 25 Nxg6+) Kg8 24 Qh4 h6 25 Ng4. <21 Rg3!> Welcoming 21 ... Nxc6 22 Nxg7 Ne7 23 Nxe8 Qxe8, as 24 Qf3! hits b7 and f6. <21f5> After 21 ... g6 22 Nf6, best is ceding the exchange by 22 ... Bg7 23 Nxe8. If 22 ... Nxc6, White forces mate with 23 Rh3 h6 24 Qg5! Kg7 25 Rxh6 Bd6 26 Nh5+ Kg8 27 Rh8+! Kxh8 28 Qh6+. <22 Qh4 Nxc6> Or 22 ... g6 23 Qf6+ Kg8 24 Rxg6+ hxg6 25 Qxg6+ Kh8 26 Nf6, mating. <23 Nf6! h6 24 Qxh6+ gxh6 25 Rg8+, Black Mated.> Pretty good for a retiree!

<15th World Computer Chess Championship (2007) >

#10: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 e6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 a6 5 Nc3 b5 6 Bd3 d6 7 0-0 Nf6 8 Be3 Bb7 9 f4> Inviting 9b4 10 e5! bxc3 11 exf6 cxb2?, when 12 Rb1 Qxf6 13 Rxb2 leaves Black in trouble. Tougher, but still undesirable for Black, is 11Qxf6 12 bxc3 Nd7 13 Rb1. <9Nbd7 10 a3 Qc7> The counterattack 10Rc8 11 Qf3 Rxc3!? 12 bxc3 Nc5 favors White after 13 c4. <11 Qf3 Be7 12 Rae1> A standard attacking formation. White can meet 120-0 by 13 g4. <12Nc5 13 Bf2 d5!?> Another critical line begins 130-0 14 Qh3 Rfe8, when 15 e5 Nxd3 is satisfactory for Black. <14 e5 Nfe4 15 f5!?> A fantastically complicated new idea. <15Nd2> Inserting 15Nxd3 doesn't help, as White can refute 16 cxd3 Nd2 17 Qg4 g6 by the surprising 18 f6! Bc5 19 Nxe6 fxe6 20 Qxe6+ Kd8 21 Bxc5 Qxc5+ 22 Rf2 Nb3 23 f7. But 15Qxe5 16 b4 Qf6! 17 bxc5 Nxc3 18 Qg3 Ne4 may survive. <16 Qg4 g6?> Black had to risk 16Nxf1 17 Qxg7 0-0-0, although 18 Rxf1 will give White plenty for the exchange. Note that 17Rf8? would lose beautifully to 18 Ncxb5! axb5 19 Bxb5+ Kd8 (or 19Nd7 20 fxe6 fxe6 21 Nxe6 Qc8 22 Nxf8 Bxf8 23 Qxh7 Kd8 24 e6) 20 Bh4! Kc8 21 f6. <17 fxe6 fxe6> The plausible 170-0 18 exf7+ Rxf7 will cost Black material after 19 Nf5! Bf8 20 e6 Rf6 21 Qg5. <18 Ncxb5!> Foreseeing 18axb5 19 Bxb5+ Nd7 20 Nxe6 Qc8 21 Bb6! Nxf1 22 Rxf1, threatening 23 Ng7 mate. Or, if 19Kd8, then 20 b4! Nxf1 21 bxc5 strikes at e6. <18Qd7 19 Nd6+ Bxd6 20 exd6 0-0> After 200-0-0 21 Nf3!, Black has no time for 21Nxd3 22 cxd3 Nxf1 because 23 Rc1+ Kb8 24 Qd4 Ba8 25 Ne5 attacks. He can reduce the danger to his King by 21Nxf3+ 22 Qxf3 Qxd6, but 23 Qh3 will soon win at least a pawn. <21 Bxg6! hxg6> Not 21Nxf1 because 22 Nxe6 (threatening 23 Bf7+) Nxe6 23 Bf5+ Qg7 24 Bxe6+ Kh8 25 Bd4 pins and wins. <22 Nf3!> Dazzling. Black could linger a while in the endgame after 22 Qxg6+ Qg7 23 Qxg7+ Kxg7 24 b4 Nxf1. <22Nxf1> There is no good way to save the Knight at c5. If 22Nxf3+ 23 gxf3 Rac8 24 Bxc5 Rxc5, then 25 Rxe6 is deadly. Toughest is 22Nde4 23 Bd4 e5 24 Qxg6+ Qg7, but 25 Nxe5 will overwhelm Black with pawns. <23 Bxc5 Bc8 24 Ne5 Qg7 25 d7> Elegant simplification. <Bxd7 26 Nxd7 Qxd7 27 Bd4!> The last difficult calculation. White anticipates 27Qh7 28 Qxe6+ Rf7 29 Rxf1 Raf8 30 Rf6! and 28Qf7 29 Qe5 Kh7 30 Qg5! Kg8 31 Re7. <27Rf7 28 Qxg6+ Rg7 29 Bxg7 Qxg7, and 1-0.> White would gain a third pawn by 30 Qxe6+ Kh8 31 Rxf1.

#1
Carlsen vs Portisch, 2007 
(E04) Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3, 30 moves, 1-0

#2
Kramnik vs Aronian, 2007 
(C89) Ruy Lopez, Marshall, 45 moves, 1-0

#3
Potkin vs B Sambuev, 2007
(E67) King's Indian, Fianchetto, 43 moves, 1-0

#4
Kudrin vs Robson, 2007 
(B81) Sicilian, Scheveningen, Keres Attack, 25 moves, 1-0

#5
Kaidanov vs Alexander V Ivanov, 2007 
(B18) Caro-Kann, Classical, 29 moves, 1-0

#6
Mulyar vs D Gurevich, 2007
(B64) Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 32 moves, 0-1

#7
Khachiyan vs Shabalov, 2007 
(B33) Sicilian, 48 moves, 1-0

#8
Deep Fritz vs Deep Junior, 2007 
(D85) Grunfeld, 54 moves, 0-1

#9
Karpov vs Mihajlo Stojanovic, 2007 
(C10) French, 25 moves, 1-0

#10
Rybka vs Diep, 2007 
(B43) Sicilian, Kan, 5.Nc3, 29 moves, 1-0

10 games

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