chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing
 
 
Premium Chessgames Member
0ZeR0
Chess Game Collections
[what is this?] --*-- [what is this?]

  1. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 1
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    212 games, 1749-2021

  2. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 2
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    212 games, 1575-2021

  3. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 3
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    212 games, 1620-2020

  4. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 4
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    207 games, 1839-2021

  5. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 5
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    207 games, 1851-2021

  6. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 6
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    207 games, 1853-2021

  7. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 7
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    207 games, 1857-2021

  8. 0ZeR0's Favorite Games Volume 8
    I have always a slight feeling of pity for the man who has no knowledge of chess, just as I would pity the man who has remained ignorant of love. Chess, like love, like music, has the power to make men happy.

    - Siegbert Tarrasch

    207 games, 1882-2021

  9. Capablanca's Best Chess Endings
    From the book Capablanca's Best Chess Endings by Irving Chernev (1978):

    The opening of a game is important - and hundreds of books are written on the opening. The opening leads to the midgame. The midgame is important - and hundreds of books are written on the midgame. The midgame leads to the endgame. The endgame is important - and no books are written on the endgame!

    Yes, there are books, but they concern themselves with composed endings, or with theoretical (and for the most part artificial) positions. The composed endings are admittedly beautiful, but they are of limited value, as they have no relationship to practical play. Of the theoretical positions, many have their uses, but one must sift the wheat from the chaff. To what use can we put such knowledge as the procedure for mating with a Knight and Bishop, or with the two Bishops, when an opportunity to do so may not occur in a lifetime? And why burden our minds with the manner of forcing mate with three knights (believe-it-or-not) or winning with four minor pieces against a Queen (sans Pawns) when such positions as these have never yet been seen on land or sea? Capablanca himself says: "In order to improve your game, you must study the endgame before anything else; for whereas the endings can be studied and mastered by themselves, the middlegame and the opening must be studied in relation to the endgame." There are no books on endings from real life, no books from the practices of masters in actual play, let alone from the practice of a single master. This fact alone is enough to justify this book of endings, selected from the tournament and match play of the greatest endgame virtuoso the world has ever seen - the immortal Capablanca. Here are wondrous endings to enchant the reader, endings of breathtaking artistry. Here are endings of astonishing accuracy, whose relentless logic will inspire the earnest student to emulate a similar technique - the technique of seeking a clear-cut, efficient win, instead of a display of fireworks. The games are given in full, in order to show how a slight advantage acquired in the early stages, is carried forward and exploited in the endgame. I have annotated the endings in detail (a consideration they have rarely received before) for the better appreciation of the fine points of Capablanca's play, and have given credit to those who have anticipated my findings.

    - Irving Chernev

    60 games, 1901-1936

  10. The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played
    From the book The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played by Irving Chernev (1965):

    "Chess, like love, is infectious at any age."

    - Salo Flohr

    Introduction
    Chess masters play to win. In doing so they would like to create masterpieces. They would like to conjure up brilliant combinations that leave everybody gasping with wonder and admiration - but first and foremost, they play to win, and win quickly and easily. The chess master knows which positions are favorable, and tries to bring these positions about. He knows that his pieces must be placed where they exert the utmost influence, and where they prevent the opponent's pieces from moving about freely. He knows that Rooks must seize the open files, with a view to gaining control of the seventh rank. He knows that Bishops must either command long diagonals, or else pin down and paralyze the opponent's Knights. He knows the squares on which his Knights must be posted to get a powerful grip on the position. He realizes the essential truth in Tartakover's epigram, "Seize the outpost K5 with your Knight, and you can go to sleep. Checkmate will come by itself." The chess master knows how to obtain a slight advantage, and then exploit it to the fullest. In short, he knows the strategy of winning. The games in this book are to my mind the most instructive examples in the whole literature of the game, of position play - the strategy of winning chess. Who, for example, will doubt the tremendous power exerted by a Rook posted on the seventh rank, after seeing Capablanca's delightfully clear-cut demonstration in game No. 1 against Tartakover? And who will not learn a great deal about the art of handling Rook and Pawn endings (the most important endings in chess), after playing through Tarrasch's game against Thorold? And can there be a more convincing illustration of the paralyzing effect on the opponent's position that comes from control of the black squares, than in the Bernstein-Mieses game? Or are there more enlightening and entertaining Bishop and Pawn endings than feature the two games between Blackburne and Weiss? These games, as well as all the others, are masterly demonstrations of the basic strategy of winning. So much so that I thought an appropriate title for a book of these games should be The Most Instructive Games of Chess Ever Played. But I might just as well have called this collection The Most Beautiful Games of Chess Ever Played.

    - Irving Chernev

    62 games, 1873-1961

SEARCH ENTIRE GAME COLLECTION DATABASE
use these two forms to locate other game collections in the database

Search by Keyword:

EXAMPLE: Search for "OPENING TRAPS" or "TAL".
Search by Username:


NOTE: You must type their screen-name exactly.
Home | About | Login | Logout | F.A.Q. | Profile | Preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | New Kibitzing | Chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | Privacy Notice | Contact Us

Copyright 2001-2021, Chessgames Services LLC