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CoachTatiana
Chess Game Collections
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  1. 4-2 vs 3-3 Pawn Structure
    8 games, 1909-2007

  2. Checkmate: Checkmate Patterns
    Based on the book "The Big Book of Chess" by Eric Schiller, here are the checkmates that I found on pages 88-98.

    Back Rank Mate: A rook moves to the back rank, while the king is trapped by the pawns.


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    Anastasia's Mate: A rook moves to check the king, while the knight covers escape squares.


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    Anderssen's Mate: A rook moves to the back rank corner, protected by a pawn, which is in turn defended by the king.


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    Arabian Mate: A rook, protected by the knight, moves to check a king in the corner.


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    Blackburne's Mate: One bishop gives check, protected by a knight that covers one flight square, while the other bishop covers the other escape squares.


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    Boden's Mate: One bishop moves to check the black king, which is hemmed in by its own pieces and cannot flee because of white's other bishop.


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    Damiano's Mate: The queen gives checkmate, protected by the pawn.


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    Knight Corner Mate: Use the knight to give check, while the rook stands guard on the file, and the pawn prevents the king from moving forward.


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    Cozio's Mate: The queen delivers the checkmate, attacking the enemy king while the queen is guarded by its own king.


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    Damiano Bishop Mate: The queen goes directly in front of the king, guarded by the bishop.


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    David and Goliath Mate: A mere pawn checkmates the king, protected by the other pawn. Black's own pieces prevent its escape.


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    Double Bishop Mate: The bishop moves to atttack the king along the long diagonal.


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    Dovetail Mate: The queen checks the king, protected by the pawn.


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    Epaulette Mate: Move the queen two squares in front of the enemy king, whose flanking rooks prevent any escape.


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    Greco's Mate: The queen goes to the right edge of the board. The king's escape is cut off by the other bishop.


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    Hook Mate: The rook slides over to the e-file so that it attacks the king. The knight protects it, and the pawn cuts off the remaning flight square.


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    Corner Mate: The rook moves to the corner, protected by the bishop.


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    Legal's Mate: The knight moves into a position to check the king. The bishop is guarded by the other knight, and the enemy pieces block the king's escape.


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    Lolli's Mate: The pawn can guard the queen on the checkmating square.


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    Max Lange's Mate: The queen moves to checking position next to the king, defended by its bishop.


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    Minor Piece Mate: White gives check with the bishop, and the knight covers the king's escape squares.


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    Morphy's Mate: The bishop gives check on the long diagonal. The rook and pawn insure that the king cannot escape.


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    Reti's Mate: THe bishop goes to the edge of the board, giving check while guarded by the rook.


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    Opera Mate: The rook checkmates on the back rank; it has the bishop as a protector.


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    Pillsbury's Mate: The rook moves over to the g-file to give check to the king, who can't get to the the corner because of the bishop.


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    Queen and Pawn Mate: The pawn acts as a guardian to protect the queen as it checkmates the king.


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    Smothered Mate: The king is surrounded by its own forces, but cannot escape from the knight check.


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    Note: I have disallowed smothered mates in this collection because I already have a collection: Game Collection: Checkmate: Smothered.

    Suffocation Mate: The knight checks at e7, and the bishop covers the escape squares.


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    Swallow-Tail Mate: The queen takes up a position directly in front of the king, defended by the bishop.


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    Corridor's Mate: The queen delivers the checkmate on the edge of the board. A rook would do the job just as well.


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    Mighty Queen Mate: The queen moves to the back rank, and checkmates all by itself, since the pawn blocks the king's escape.


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    In order by mate listed, original mate, then date.

    52 games, 1475-2013

  3. King and Pawn Endgames
    Includes:

    King and Pawn vs. King

    King and Two Pawns vs. King

    King and Two Pawns vs. King and Pawn

    King and Three Pawns vs. King and Two Pawns

    32 games, 1783-2002

  4. Positional Chess Handbook I
    Games from "Positional Chess Handbook (Israel Gelfer)" This inexpensive book contains many more examples and is worth getting.
    141 games, 1896-1986

  5. Vukovic Mate Examples
    Vladimir Vukovic showed an essential and particular kind of Knight and Rook checkmate pattern in his book, THE ART OF ATTACK IN CHESS, Chapter 4: Mating Patterns, under "Typical Mates without Enemy Pieces," pages 66-67. It was not labelled with a name there, but several chess writers honor IM Vukovic by naming this pattern after him. This position would result from the moves given in the text by IM Vukovic:


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    (The White King is placed at a random position; IM Vukovic didn't include it in his initial diagram, which was the starting point for the Arabian Mate and this mate.)

    This kind of Rook and Knight mate is not an Arabian Mate. Further, the name Arabian Mate should not be applied to the Hook Mate. I have compiled a game collection on the Hook Mate as well: Game Collection: Hook Mate Examples.

    There should be a formal, technical name for this mating position, but "Vukovic Mate" is more colorful and easier to remember for the Royal Guards Chess Club members, so I prefer to use this moniker.

    Similarly, I prefer Pandolfini's use of "Rook Roll" rather than the more mundane and yet proper Double Rook Mate. (My younger club members irrepressibly smile when I use a giant chess set with a tablecloth "board" and then watch me literally roll it up as the mating net proceeds!)

    This kind of checkmate intrigues me, so I chose to start a collection of games for studying it. Of course, the games are most likely to need continuations to see the Vukovic Mate, since modern players resign when the game is nearly lost.

    The games are listed in chronological order, oldest first. However, the Saravanan vs Sasikiran game (which IS included in this collection) is the archetype for most Internet citations (without being identified). Continuation in that game gives us this diagram:


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    The Vukovic Mate may be expressed in several forms, although in every case, the "victimized" King, friendly Rook and friendly Knight are contiguous and in a straight line, with the Rook directly against the opposing King. Someone needs to protect the Rook, then. A Pawn, Bishop, Queen or King could be its protector, as well as a distant Rook or a second Knight in certain cases. Further, there may be two or more protectors for the Rook (i.e., the Spassky - Larsen 1968 continuation has both the friendly King and a Pawn aiding him). Here is its diagram:


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    For brevity, the header for each game will indicate the color and type of the protector for the Rook ("multi" for two or more of them) to eliminate the need to say Knight and Rook and their colors. Further, the game actually ended with the Vukovic Mate, unless "Continuation" is given.

    At one point, I thought that the earliest Vukovic Mate was Moeller - Jonsson, Gothenburg 1901, 38 moves, 1-0, which is not in this website's database. However, the Staunton - Williams game of 1851 far precedes it. Of course, there could still be a predecessor out there.

    This is a work in progress, so I'd appreciate your suggestions for additional games and other information about this checkmate pattern.

    All the best to all, always.

    31 games, 1851-2013

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