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David Janowski vs Akiba Rubinstein
Ostend (1906), Ostend BEL, rd 24, Jul-04
Formation: Queen Pawn Game: London System (D02)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
Sep-09-04
Premium Chessgames Member
  Chessical: Polished positional play by Rubinstein from which we can learn a lot. Rubinstein makes Janowsky's plan of a K-side attack ineffective. Rubinstein was just as successful some twenty years later against another strong opponent:

Samisch vs Rubinstein, 1926.

By move 13 Rubinstein is fully developed and cranking up an attack on the Q-side. Janowsky has no weak points to attack, and is soon saddled with a weak pawn on c3. This weakness takes all of the energy from Janowsky's position.

Sep-12-07
Premium Chessgames Member
  Honza Cervenka: Both 42.Kh3 Rh2+ 43.Kg4 Rag2+ 44.Kf3 Rh3+ and 42.Kh1 Rgd2 43.Qb1 (43.Qf1 Rh2+ 44.Kg1 Rag2+ 45.Qxg2 Rxg2+ 46.Kxg2 exf5 ) 43...Rh2+ 44.Kg1 Rag2+ 45.Kf1 Rh1+ lead to loss of Queen.
Oct-13-10  Sularus: 13. ... Ke7 just ruins White's plans of storming black's king side. lol
Jul-07-20  MordimerChess: Ostende 1906 was a completely crazy tournament. 36 players played in the 5-stage competition (nowadays if we see 2 stages: group+ knockout stage - it's the fanciest way to do it). But in old times spectators could enjoy a lot more finesse by organizers. The players who were qualified to the 5th stage had to play 30 games altogether:D

Anyway, this is my video analysis - I think I like it: https://youtu.be/TwGsuc85miI

Enjoy!

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<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

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