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Paul Keres vs Heinrich Israel
EST-ch (1943), Tallinn EST, rd 4, Jul-22
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Classical. Zurich Variation (E33)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Given 21 times; par: 26 [what's this?]

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sac: 19.e6 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-27-06  prinsallan: Yep, easy. Maybe too easy for a wednesday.
Sep-27-06  rotgut: <al wazir> ...it looks as if white has to lose a b...

OK, take two on this message....

I think white can play ♕e5 threatening mate instead of ♕xc6. If f6, ♕d4 protects both bishops.

Sep-27-06  Vanish Doom: 19.e6 should jump out at you immediately with the queen and bishop lined up on c3 and b2. Threatens both the knight on d7 (which happens to guard the queen on c5) and Qxg7 mate. Certainly easier than yesterday's puzzle.
Sep-27-06  Marco65: <al wazir> <Is the final position resignable?> A question I din't even ask myself (blame on me), anyway the answer is yes: 20...Qxd2 21.dxe8=Q+ Nf8 22.Ba3 Bb7 23.Qe7 and White is a full rook up
Sep-27-06  Hincho: Rather than revel in the reflected glory of solving todays rather simple puzzle I urge all those amongst us who are unfamilar with Paul Keres games to go on a little, but immensely enjoyable, journey. Play through a few of the man's games and discover for yourself what an enormous talent and major contribution he has made to our beloved game.A truly great chess player.
Sep-27-06  onesax: A little harder than yesterday's for mine - yesterday's was easy, jumped right out at me, whereas today I too had to stop looking at 20. exf7+ like dzechiel and al wazir to find the correct move 20. exd7 after about a minute or two.
Sep-27-06  eblunt: <marco65> but if 20 ...Qe5 21 BxQ BxP black is 'only' a bishop down
Sep-27-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  lilfoohk: 3 secs to get it
Sep-27-06  psmith: <TrueFiendish> Black can keep his losses to a piece with 20... Bxd7.
Sep-27-06  Marco65: <eblunt> Sure, and you get the same result more simply with the immediate 20...Bxd7. But I was'n giving the main line, I was just trying to refute 20...Qxd2. Another refutation is what <rotgut> gave and I din't notice when I wrote
Sep-27-06  psmith: <al wazir>, <rotgut>, <Marco65>

Checking with Fritz 5.32, actually after 20...Qxd2 21. dxe8=Q+ Nf8, 22. Qxc6 is the very best move, but after 22... Rb8, White continues with 23. Be5 rather than 23. Qxd5, winning even more material.

Sep-27-06  Halldor: Got this because of yesterdays preparation,
M Galyas vs J Boguszlavszkij, 2001
19.e6!! is a double threat, attacking the only defender of the black queen and threatening mate also. When I saw that the black queen couldn't retreat after 20.exd7 and guard the rook I knew this was the solution. - So the theme of the week is maybe the power of the advanced pawn.
Sep-27-06  xenophon: any one got any details on Harold Israel?This game would have been played when Tallin was controlled by the Nazis-I just wondered if he survived them.
Sep-27-06  YouRang: <dzechiel: Saw the push of the e-pawn immediately, but it took me a minute to stop considering exf7+ and look at exd7 instead. An easy combo for Keres.>

Same here. I kept looking for clever ways to use Bxh7+ or exf7+, but finally realized it was a fairly simple promotion tactic to scoff a piece. Nice puzzle, and I was determined to solve it after bungling yesterday's.

Sep-27-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For today's puzzle solution, the discovered attack 19.e5! wins a piece as the chain of pawn attacks creates a double attack, which forces the loss of the Queen and remaining a piece down in order to avoid mate.
Sep-27-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: I answered 100% on this one-rare for me-past Monday,that is.

White's nineteenth move is a form of double attack-mate on g7 and the knight. The 20th move is even better:threatens mate,as well as keeping the pressure on the black queen. The queen must be lost-to leave black a piece in arrears.

Sep-27-06  alphee: It looks like even if not in the end game "passed pawns must/should be pushed". In fact I found e6 just because my routine includes this ...
Sep-27-06  DeepThought: after 20. ...Bxd7 21. Bxc3, Black is a Bishop down for a connected passed pawn.
Sep-27-06  greensfield: Saw 19. e6 straight away, obvious move to get a mating attack on the long diagonal. But didn't consider exd7. As a result rejected it and selected 19. Nc4 first to block Queen exchange. Must have had my blinkers on.
Sep-27-06  bakuazer: <Hincho:Rather than revel in the reflected glory of solving todays rather simple puzzle I urge all those amongst us who are unfamilar with Paul Keres games to go on a little, but immensely enjoyable, journey. Play through a few of the man's games and discover for yourself what an enormous talent and major contribution he has made to our beloved game.A truly great chess player.> I have read Kasparov saying that Keres was one of the very few great chess players who deserved to be a champion but did not become one. nice puzzle but easy.
Sep-27-06  silenthinker: got this again :D
Sep-27-06  vibes43: I choose 19. e6 for lack of anything better but wasn't thinking 20.eXd7. Maybe would have though with more time on move 20.

Great puzzle - thanks

Oct-01-06  Uzi: <any one got any details on Harold Israel?This game would have been played when Tallin was controlled by the Nazis-I just wondered if he survived them.>

According to Chess Personalia, Harold Israel was the 1949 British Correspondence Champion. Initially, this led me to suspect this was actually a correspondence game, but now I think the game data is correct and that Israel emigrated to Britain after the war. Perhaps someone with a complete collection of Keres' games could confirm this was played in the 1943 Estonian championship.

Oct-02-06  xenophon: <According to Chess Personalia, Harold Israel was the 1949 British Correspondence Champion. Initially, this led me to suspect this was actually a correspondence game, but now I think the game data is correct and that Israel emigrated to Britain after the war. Perhaps someone with a complete collection of Keres' games could confirm this was played in the 1943 Estonian championship>

Thanks for that.

Oct-02-06
Premium Chessgames Member
  Legend: <According to Chess Personalia, Harold Israel was the 1949 British Correspondence Champion. Initially, this led me to suspect this was actually a correspondence game, but now I think the game data is correct and that Israel emigrated to Britain after the war. Perhaps someone with a complete collection of Keres' games could confirm this was played in the 1943 Estonian championship>

I checked it out ... Yep, the game was indeed played in the 1943 Estonian championship.

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