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Amanmurad Kakageldyev vs Vitaly Tseshkovsky
URS-ch FL46 (1978), Ashgabat TKM, rd 12, Oct-??
Benoni Defense: Fianchetto Variation. Hastings Defense Main Line (A64)  ·  1/2-1/2

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
Jan-12-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  Phony Benoni: Not your usual 30-move draw! Here's the position after 27.Kf5:


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Black may have a win here with <27...Rf8+ 28.Ke6> (28.Ke4 Qg2+) <29...Qh3+ 30.Kxd6 Qc8!> The main line runs <31.Kxe5 Qe8+ 32.Kd6 Rf6+ 32.Kxc5 Qxe3+ 33.Qd4 b6+ 34.Kc4 Rf4 35.Nf5 Qe2+ 36.Kb3 Rxd4 37.Nxd4 Qd3+>, but there's a lot of other stuff which you and/or your engine can find and/or refute. This analaysis comes from a tournament book edited by Keene, Nunn, Wade, Chandler, and Blackstock, but there is no indication whose fantasy this is. (Personally, I'm betting on Nunn.)

Had Tseshkovsky found this instead of settling for a perpetual check, we would have had GOTD material here. It's still an interesting game.

Feb-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli:


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Here it seems that 19...Bxg2 20.Kxg2 Qh2+ 21.Kf3 was much stronger than 19...Bd4, as played by Tseshkovsky. I was thinking of 21...Qh3 here, threatening Nh2 mate. White has to play 22.Rh1 and give the exchange. Black ends up with rook and pawn for two pieces but holds the initiative. The computer, however, says that 21...g5 is stronger. It gets complicated, and it leads to an evaluation of -3.

And then there is the line shown by <PB>. Quite an exciting game.

Feb-17-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Retireborn: <Fusili> Good point. My engine reckons that 20.e3 is a loser, and that 20.hxg6 fxg6 21.Qd3 is the only good way for White to play. In that case after 21...Bxg2 22.Kxg2 Qh2+ 23.Kf3 g5 does not work because of 24.Qg6+, and the alternative 23...Ne5+ only delivers perpetual after 24.Bxe5 Rf8+ 25.Bf4 Rxf4+ 26.Kxf4 Rf8+ 27.Kg4 h5+ 28.Kg5 Bf6+.

The white king dances on a precipice!

Regarding <PB>'s line, Houdini reckons that 28...Qh3+ is a mistake and 28...Qh4 (threatens ...Qf6#) is the winner.

According to Tseshkovsky in Informator, the final position is won for Black and he only repeated moves because of time trouble. I recall that in one of his books, Jan Timman described him as a "deep sea diver" ie somebody who spends a lot of time early in the game.

Feb-22-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Fusilli: <Retireborn> Exciting lines. It looks like in your first line, aside from 24.Qg6+ white would also have 24.Kxg4, no?

<The white king dances on a precipice!>

Indeed!

What a save for Kakageldyev and what a miss for Tseshkovsky.

Exciting game. One is almost guaranteed to have a good time going over those USSR championships of yore.

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