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Simon Knight vs Vladimir Georgiev
Mexican Open (2008), Mexico City MEX
Queen Pawn Game: Colle System (D04)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  areknames: Definitely not Friday standard.
Dec-21-18  latebishop: Mayankk-Yes seeing 22.d5 is the challenging part in visualising the mate I think.
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  areknames: Unusual to see a GM murdered like this by an untitled player.
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Took me a little while but I think this works:

20. Qc4+ Kf6 21. Re6+ Kxf5 22. Rxe8 Rxe8 23. Qf7+ Ke4 24. Qxe8+ Kf3 (Kxd4 is kamikaze-ville) 25. Qe3#

Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  ChessHigherCat: Whoops, missed the defense 23...Nf6. <Mayankk> I looked at d5 but didn't see the follow-up.
Dec-21-18  Eduardo Leon: Not that difficult.

<20.♕c4+ ♔f6 21.♖e6+ ♔xf5>

21...♖xe6 22.♕xe6#

<22.d5!>

Black cannot simultaneously stop both threats 23.♕f4# and 23.♕e4#.

Dec-21-18  stacase: <<Mayankk: I got the first two moves in a jiffy but struggled to spot 22 d5.> latebishop: Mayankk-Yes seeing 22.d5 is the challenging part in visualising the mate I think.>

Same here I spent the most time on 22.d5 But then you had to make that first move, 20.Qc4+, in the puzzle correctly as 20.Pxg6+ was quicker to spot. But as one of those little tips you see when you post says, <"When you see a good move look for a better one">, definitely applied in this case.

Too easy for a Friday? Yeah, I thought so but then at my level Chess is sometimes just plain dumb luck and you stumble on coming up with the best move (-:

Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Richard Taylor: I found the moves. I forgot though that Qf4 was mate and calculated Qg4 which also wins. But I saw Qf4 mate in all other lines or Qg4 mate.

Reasonably straightforward. Quite a beautiful attack by White.

Dec-21-18  Walter Glattke: Prolongue mate possible with e.g. 22.-Qxf2+ 23.Kxf2 Bc5+ 24.Kg2 Bd4 25.Qd3#
Dec-21-18  Walter Glattke: 22.d5 threatens 4 mates: Qe4/f4/g4/d3
Dec-21-18  siggemannen: 17...Kf8 seems better
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  malt: Have 20.Qc4+ Kf6 21.Re6+ K:f5 22.d5 cd5
23.Q:d5+ Ne5 24.Q:e5#

Noticed 23.Qg4# later.

Dec-21-18  gofer: 20 Qc4+ Kf6 (Re6 Qxe6#) 21 Re6+ Kxf5 (Rxe6 Qxe6#)

At this point, there are probably lots of solutions. But one grabbing lots of bits seems to be...

22 Rxe8 (threatening Qf7#) Rxe8
23 Qf7+ Ke4
24 Qxe8+ Kf4/Kd4 (Kxd4 Be3+!)
25 Qxd7+ +-

Black escapes for a few more moves, but is a whole rook down and its probably time to resign...

~~~

<Doh!> 22 d5 is much cleaner!!!

Dec-21-18  Walter Glattke: gofer: 23.-Nf6
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  thegoodanarchist: Simon says "checkmate!"
Dec-21-18  eyalbd: Qc4+ and Re6 are obvious. The key move is d5! with deadly threats on the 4th rank. Not too difficult to find.
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Breunor: Also missed d5! I think I would have made the first two moves instinctively, maybe I would then have found d5 but I didn't see it from the beginning.
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: If you missed 22 d5 like me, what else wins for white? How about 22 Qe2, below,threatening 23 Qe4#?


click for larger view

But if black counters with 22...Qxd4, below, how can white still win?


click for larger view

Dec-21-18  bubuli55: 23.c3 would be my move
Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: <Jimfromprovidence> Now trying variation <21...Kxf5 22.Qe2 Qxd4>


click for larger view

1) +9.08 (31 ply) 23.c3 Rxe6 24.Qf3+ Ke5 25.cxd4+ Kd6 26.d5 Rf6 27.Bf4+ Ke7 28.Bg5 Kf7 29.Bxf6 Nxf6 30.dxc6 bxc6 31.Qxc6 Rd8 32.Qc4+ Rd5 33.Qxb4 a5 34.Qb7+ Rd7 35.Qb6 a4 36.Qb5 Rd4 37.Rc1 Nd7 38.Rc7 Ke8 39.Qc6 a3 40.Qe6+ Kd8 41.Ra7 axb2

6.0 minute analysis by Stockfish 9 v010218

Dec-21-18  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 20 dpa done only

<1. + / = (0.27): 12...Qc8> 13.c3 Nf6 14.Qb3 Nd5 15.Nf4 Bxf3 16.gxf3 Qd7 17.c4 Nxf4 18.Bxf4 0-0 19.fxe4 Qxd4 20.Rad1 Qb6 21.exf5 Qxb3 22.axb3 Bf6 23.Rd7 Rf7 24.Rd2 Be7 25.Re5 Raf8 26.Be3 Bb4 27.Rd1 a6 28.Kg2 a5 29.Re4 Rxf5 30.Rd7 R5f7

2. + / - (1.12): 12...Qb6 13.h3 Bxf3 14.gxf3 Kf7 15.fxe4 Kxe6 16.Qh5 Nf6 17.d5+ cxd5 18.exd5+ Kd7 19.Qxf5+ Kd8 20.Re6 Qc5 21.Be3 Qxd5 22.Rxf6 Qxf5 23.Rxf5 Bf6 24.c3 Re8 25.Rd1+ Ke7 26.Rfd5 Ke6 27.Rd7 Re7 28.R7d6+ Kf5 29.R6d5+ Re5 30.Rd7 b6 31.Kg2 Ra5 32.a3 Re8 33.Rc7 Re7 34.Rc6 Re8

Dec-21-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <bubuli55> <whiteshark> Yes, 23 c3, below, works because the threat 24 Qg4# either makes black move the queen along the 4th rank or give up the queen (as in the line provided by <whiteshark>)


click for larger view

But keeping the queen on the 4th rank with say 23...Qh4 does not work because 24 Re1 is a forced mate.


click for larger view

Dec-21-18  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 24 dpa done

<1. = (0.00): 8...exd4> 9.Re1 Be7 10.Nb3 Nxe4 11.Rxe4 Nf6 12.Rxd4 Qc8 13.Qe2 c5 14.Rd1 h6 15.Bf4 Be6 16.Qb5+ Bd7 17.Qe2 Be6 18.Qb5+

<2. = (0.06): 8...Be7> 9.dxe5 Nxe5 10.Qe2 Nxf3+ 11.Bxf3 Bxf3 12.Nxf3 0-0 13.Rd1 Qc7 14.Bf4 Qxf4 15.Qxe7 b6 16.Rd2 Rfe8 17.Qb7 c5 18.Rad1 h6 19.h3 Qf5 20.a3 Qe4 21.Qxe4 Nxe4 22.Re2 Nf6 23.Ree1 Rxe1+ 24.Rxe1 Re8 25.Rxe8+ Nxe8 26.Ne5 Nd6

Dec-22-18  Knightcarver: According to the Chesslab.com database, this game was played in Aguascalientes, a casino city northwest of Mexico City, not even a suburb.
Jan-01-19  bubuli55: “A Knight to Remember”
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