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Levon Aronian vs Alexander Grischuk
FIDE Grand Prix (2008), Sochi RUS, rd 13, Aug-14
Semi-Slav Defense: Meran. Wade Variation (D47)  ·  1-0

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Kibitzer's Corner
Aug-14-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: First to congratulate! A phantastic game by Aronian, who deserved the win of the tournament.
Aug-14-08  notyetagm: Aronian is back!

I still cannot understand how someone as talented as Aronian, who played some outstanding chess in this tournament and has beaten Nakamura six blitz games in a row(!) on ICC, could go winless -4 at M-Tel.

Aronian is so freakin' talented. It's just awesome to watch him when he is in good form.

Aug-14-08  Davolni: <notyetagm> is it confirmed that it was Aronian that won those 6 games? THere were rumors that it has been Carlsen.

what's the final word on that one???

Aug-14-08  notyetagm: <Davolni: <notyetagm> is it confirmed that it was Aronian that won those 6 games? THere were rumors that it has been Carlsen.

what's the final word on that one???>

Don't know. I am just going by that ICC-related page that said that <AndrinoGiardino> was "most likely" Aronian.

But <AndrinoGiardino> played a long blitz match with Nakamura on ICC during the last rest day of the Sochi Grand Prix. And it seemed very strange to everyone watching (including me) that if <AG> were really Aronian, that he would spend his rest day during a critically important tournament playing hours of skittles games against Nakamura.

To me that was evidence that <AG> is not Aronian. But it very well could be that Aronian loves chess so much that that is exactly how he spends his rest day!

We will have to wait for Aronian to give a definitive statement on the issue.

Aug-14-08  notyetagm: Yet another masterpiece by Aronian. Another incredibly impressive win by Aronian. Simply beautiful, elegant play, like watching Capablanca in this game.

Position after 38 ♖a8-c8


click for larger view

Look how active, coordinated, and dominating Aronian's (White's) pieces are in this position. How Aronian can so completely outplay a player as strong as Grischuk (2738!) like this is simply amazing. This game looks like Aronian vs NN in a simul!

Aug-14-08  Davolni: I'm gonna try to find out, and I'll let you know if I am able to find out the answer for it!!!

Thanks;)

Aug-14-08  Bobsterman3000: wow, black's ls bishop gets stranded offside on b5 and is virtually useless after that.

Great thematic play by Aronian.

Aug-14-08  notyetagm: Beautiful win by Aronian.
Aug-14-08  messachess: I do not know who gets the brilliancy prize (I haven't studied most of the games), but if it were between Aronian and Rodjabov in the last round, I wouldn't know how to judge. Aronian's win looks so effortless that it's hard to see the positional mastery that went into it. Rodjabov's was positionally masterful. You (that means you patzers) be the judge.
Aug-15-08  arsen387: Simply a masterpiece. Subtle moves like 15.Bf3, 19.Bc5!, 20.b4!, 22.Re1!(to avoid the pin of Ba6), 34.Kg1! are very deep moves. And in combination it all looks so simple. The move 28.Qa5! deserves an exclamation mark. It threatens 29.Nxd5 (d8 R is undefended) and the variation 28..Nxb6 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7 leaves black with inferior endgame. Another Capa style win by Levon!
Aug-15-08  adair10: <is it confirmed that it was Aronian that won those 6 games> against Nakamura? <THere were rumors that it has been Carlsen>

I heard someone saying that Aronian's second GM Potkin allegedly admited that <AndrinoGiardino> was in fact Aronian

Aug-15-08  euripides: <the variation 28..Nxb6 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7 leaves black with inferior endgame.> Nice. One line is <28..Nxb6 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7> Nd5 (hoping to blockade the c pawn and protect the b pawn from c7. Na8 probably leads to something similar) 31.Bxd5 exd5 32.Rb1 Rb8 33.c6 b4 (if Rc3 34.Rxb5 Rxc6 then 35.Rxd5, so BLack gets the c pawn off the fifth rank) 34.c7 Rc8 35.Rxb5 and the back rank decides.

I wonder if <28...Nxb6 29.Rb1> also works.

A very smooth performance, making the pawn sacrifice look very good indeed.

Aug-15-08  arsen387: <euripides: I wonder if <28...Nxb6 29.Rb1> also works.> I think not as good as Qxb5 variation, as seems like whites don't have that advantage after 29..Qa8 30.Qxb6 Rb8 31.Qc7 Rb7
Aug-15-08  Ulhumbrus: After 9...b4 Black's entire Q side is weak.

12 a3? gives Black the chance to remove the greater part of his Q side weaknesses.

An alternative to of 13...Nf6 is 13..Qc7 getting ready for ..c5 eg 14 Bxa3 Bxa3 15 Rxa3 c5 16 Qc2 Bxe4 17 Qxe4 0-0 18 Rfc1 Qb6

Instead of 19...Rfd8, 19..Bxc5 20 dxc5 a5 prepares ..Ba6 eg 21 Nd6 Ba6 22 Rfe1 Rfe8 with..Ne8 to follow or even 22..Ne8 at once.

Instead of 28...Qe7 28...Nxb6 29 cxb6 Rb8 wins the b6 pawn.

After 35 Bd7 Aronian has not only a King side attack but a Queen side attack as well, as he threatens to attack the c6 pawn. He will win the c6 pawn four moves later, and the game three move after that.

Aug-15-08  arsen387: <Ulhumbrus: Instead of 28...Qe7 28...Nxb6 29 cxb6 Rb8 wins the b6 pawn.> no, 28..Nxb6 then 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7. See previous posts
Aug-15-08  notyetagm: In this game Aronian plays like Capablanca, every move simple and strong.
Aug-15-08  notyetagm: White to play: 39 ?


click for larger view

Here White (Aronian) played 39 ♗d7xc6!, exploiting the fact that the <OVERWORKED> Black f6-queen cannot <DEFEND> both the <LOOSE> Black c6-pawn and the <LOOSE> Black e7-rook.

But http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/fil... shows that White missed a crushing continuation, 39 ♗d7-h3 ♗b5-d3 40 ♖c8-c7, <REINFORCING THE PIN> on the Black e7-rook against the <UNDEFENDED> Black f6-queen, shown below.

(VAR) 39 ♗d7-h3 ♗b5-d3 40 ♖c8-c7


click for larger view

<39.Bxc6 Good enough, but [39.Bh3 Bd3 40.Rc7 was much simpler, winning the rook.]>

So with 26 ♕b2-e5! Aronian exploited the <PIN> against the <UNDEFENDED> Black a5-queen in his win over Gelfand but here he failed to exploit the <PIN> against the <UNDEFENDED> Black f6-queen in this variation ending with 40 ♖c8-c7, which would have won on the spot.

Aug-15-08  Ulhumbrus: <arsen387: <Ulhumbrus: Instead of 28...Qe7 28...Nxb6 29 cxb6 Rb8 wins the b6 pawn.> no, 28..Nxb6 then 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7. See previous posts> Yes, I did not find the idea of playing the move Qxb5 as an in-between move at this particular point in my analysis. On 28...Nxb6 White interrupts the recapture cxb6 to play Qxb5 first, the black N having gone to b6. The end result of the in-between move 29 Qxb5! is that White has Bxb7 in place of cxb6 isolating the c pawn. I forget the German term z...g for an in-between move.
Aug-16-08  arsen387: <Ulhumbrus:I forget the German term z...g for an in-between move> zwischenzug
Aug-16-08  znprdx: <notyetagm:(chessmind.powerblogs)> Maybe in the variation....40..Re6 would have been an unpleasant complication since it permits Black unnecessary chances to stay alive but I suppose 41.Qf8 is then the crusher...perhaps Cap-A-ronian didn’t want to risk anything that might spring from the wild...Rxe3 – if under time pressure – when one is often prone to hallucinations
Aug-16-08  Ulhumbrus: <arsen387: <Ulhumbrus:I forget the German term z...g for an in-between move> zwischenzug> thx.
Nov-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Topalov vs Kramnik, 2006

<19.Bc5!N This strong novelty was recommended by Bareev in his book on Kramnik's world championship matches; Topalov either ignored it or was keeping mum. What can be said is that Topalov didn't prefer this move in his preparations for Kramnik, as he writes that he had prepared the position after 19.Bxe7 Qxe7 20.Ra5 beforehand. So let's talk about this position. Black has a pawn, White has a bind. If Black could play ...c5, returning the pawn but swapping off a couple of minors (especially the wedged in Bb7), equality wouldn't be too far away. And therein lies the strength of Aronian's (Bareev's) new move.> (http://chessmind.powerblogs.com/fil...)

Nov-05-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <euripides: <the variation 28..Nxb6 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7 leaves black with inferior endgame.> Nice. One line is <28..Nxb6 29.Qxb5! cxb5 30.Bxb7> Nd5 (hoping to blockade the c pawn and protect the b pawn from c7. Na8 probably leads to something similar) 31.Bxd5 exd5 32.Rb1 Rb8


click for larger view

33.c6 b4 [...] 34.c7 Rc8 35.Rxb5 and the back rank decides.>

Instead of 33...b4 (or Rc8), Black can improve with 33....Kf8 to avoid back rank troubles, and after 34.c7 Rc8 35.Rxb5 Rxc7 36.Rxd5 Rc2 the win is still far off. However, in the diagram position there's a better winning idea for White - 33.e4! creating a pair of connected passed pawns.

Apr-20-09  arsen387: a very nice game by Aronian
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