chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

 
Advanced Chess matches
Compiled by KingG
--*--

The first Advanced Chess event was held in June 1998 in León, Spain. It was played between Garry Kasparov, who was using Fritz 5, and Veselin Topalov, who was using ChessBase 7.0. The analytical engines used, such as Fritz, HIARCS and Junior, were integrated into these two programs, and could have been called at a click of the mouse. It was a 6-game match, and it was arranged in advance that the players would consult the built-in million games databases only for the 3rd and 4th game, and would only use analytical engines without consulting the databases for the remaining games. The time available to each player during the games was 60 minutes. The match ended in a 3-3 tie2. After the match, Kasparov said:

"My prediction seems to be true that in Advanced Chess it's all over once someone gets a won position. This experiment was exciting and helped spectators understand what's going on. It was quite enjoyable and will take a very big and prestigious place in the history of chess."

Regular Advanced Chess events have been held since in León each year, with a little inconsistency after 2002. The Indian grandmaster Viswanathan Anand is considered the world's best Advanced Chess player, winning the three consecutive Advanced Chess tournaments in Leon in 1999, 2000 and 2001, before losing the title to Vladimir Kramnik in 2002. After the loss to Kramnik, Anand said:

"I think in general people tend to overestimate the importance of the computer in the competitions. You can do a lot of things with the computer but you still have to play good chess. I more or less managed to do so except for this third game. In such a short match, against a very solid and hard to beat opponent, this turned out to be too much but I don’t really feel like that the computer alone can change the objective true to the position."

Wikipedia article: Advanced Chess

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 1
Topalov vs Kasparov, 1998 
(B33) Sicilian, 43 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 2
Kasparov vs Topalov, 1998 
(E60) King's Indian Defense, 36 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 3
Topalov vs Kasparov, 1998 
(B90) Sicilian, Najdorf, 58 moves, 1/2-1/2

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 4
Kasparov vs Topalov, 1998 
(E64) King's Indian, Fianchetto, Yugoslav System, 41 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 5
Topalov vs Kasparov, 1998 
(B90) Sicilian, Najdorf, 51 moves, 1-0

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 6
Kasparov vs Topalov, 1998
(E10) Queen's Pawn Game, 25 moves, 1/2-1/2

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 7
Topalov vs Kasparov, 1998 
(B89) Sicilian, 65 moves, 0-1

Kasparov vs Topalov, game 8
Kasparov vs Topalov, 1998 
(E67) King's Indian, Fianchetto, 50 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov, game 1
Karpov vs Anand, 1999
(E04) Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3, 43 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov, game 2
Anand vs Karpov, 1999
(E15) Queen's Indian, 18 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Karpov, game 3
Karpov vs Anand, 1999
(E15) Queen's Indian, 35 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Karpov, game 4
Anand vs Karpov, 1999 
(C43) Petrov, Modern Attack, 57 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Polgar, game 1
Anand vs Judit Polgar, 2000
(B42) Sicilian, Kan, 60 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Polgar, game 2
Judit Polgar vs Anand, 2000
(B90) Sicilian, Najdorf, 25 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Polgar, game 3
Judit Polgar vs Anand, 2000
(C11) French, 34 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Polgar, game 4
Anand vs Judit Polgar, 2000
(E91) King's Indian, 68 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Leko, game 1
Anand vs Leko, 2001 
(C42) Petrov Defense, 49 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Leko, game 2
Leko vs Anand, 2001 
(B97) Sicilian, Najdorf, 25 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Leko, game 3
Anand vs Leko, 2001
(C42) Petrov Defense, 48 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Leko, game 4
Leko vs Anand, 2001
(C42) Petrov Defense, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Leko, game 5
Anand vs Leko, 2001
(C42) Petrov Defense, 56 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Leko, game 6
Leko vs Anand, 2001 
(B19) Caro-Kann, Classical, 45 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Shirov, game 1
Anand vs Shirov, 2001 
(C11) French, 68 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Shirov, game 2
Shirov vs Anand, 2001 
(B12) Caro-Kann Defense, 51 moves, 0-1

Anand vs Shirov, game 3
Anand vs Shirov, 2001 
(B92) Sicilian, Najdorf, Opocensky Variation, 56 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Shirov, game 4
Shirov vs Anand, 2001 
(B90) Sicilian, Najdorf, 57 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik, game 1
Kramnik vs Anand, 2002
(D37) Queen's Gambit Declined, 33 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Kramnik, game 2
Anand vs Kramnik, 2002
(E15) Queen's Indian, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Kramnik, game 3
Kramnik vs Anand, 2002 
(D27) Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical, 37 moves, 1-0

Anand vs Kramnik, game 4
Anand vs Kramnik, 2002 
(D37) Queen's Gambit Declined, 48 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Kramnik, game 5
Kramnik vs Anand, 2002
(D27) Queen's Gambit Accepted, Classical, 38 moves, 1/2-1/2

Anand vs Kramnik, game 6
Anand vs Kramnik, 2002
(C67) Ruy Lopez, 20 moves, 1/2-1/2

32 games

 » View all game collections by KingG PGN Download
 » Search entire game collection library
 » Clone this game collection (copy it to your account)
 » FAQ: Help with Game Collections


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us
Copyright 2001-2017, Chessgames Services LLC