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Robert James Fischer vs Ulf Andersson
"They'll Do It Every Time" (game of the day Apr-27-2008)
Exhibition Game (1970), Siegen FRG, Sep-??
Nimzo-Larsen Attack: Modern Variation (A01)  ·  1-0
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Apr-27-08  Albertan: Just a note to clarify the event that this game was held at. According to chessbase this game was played at the 1970 Siegun Olympiad. Interesting information concerning this Olympiad can be read at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19th_C....

Bobby Fischer was edged out of top prize for board one by Boris Spassky (79.17%) to Fischer's performance of 76.9%. Fischer's only loss in this Olympiad was his famous game with Spassky:Spassky vs Fischer, 1970

Apr-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Quote from a review by John Donaldson on 'My Great Predecessors Part 4':

"Bobby gets the lionís share of the book, close to 300 pages. Itís hard to come up with major new evaluations of Fischerís games after they have been so carefully examined, especially by Mark Dvoretsky and Robert Huebner who are quoted extensively. Much is made of Fischerís love of the old-timers, but curiously in game 83, <the exhibition game Fischer-Andersson, Siegen 1970>, the idea of Kh1, Rg1, g4 is praised (G.K Ė Fischerís rare independent opening/middlegame invention!) while an earlier Fischer game versus Soruco (Havana 1966) is given as the origin for the idea. Andrew Soltis, writing in the introduction to MORPHY CHESS MASTERPIECES (Macmillian 1974) points out Bobby almost certainly was influenced by the game Paulsen-Morphy, New York 1857, where Black played ...Kh8, ...Rg8 and ...g5. The pawn structure is different but the similarity is there. Incidentally Morphy and Paulsen were playing each other blindfold and Morphy was playing other blindfold games at the same time. Who says the old-timers didnít know a thing or two about positional chess! "

http://www.jeremysilman.com/book_re...

Apr-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Ron: The Paulsen-Morphy game mentioned by <whiteshark> is probably this:

Paulsen vs Morphy, 1857

Fischer (and Kasparov) were interested in the chess ideas of others; perhaps that is one of the reasons why they were world champions.

Apr-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Thanks <Ron>! Once you realized such a strong pattern you will always watch out for more examples. :D
Apr-28-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: No wonder black resigned-Fischer was up the exchange and a pawn!
May-05-08  ruelas007: <whiteshark> Oh rofl!
Aug-26-08  Slurpeeman: I found another manuscript of Fischer - Andersson on Mychess.com (tactics 1 = > #7). Which one is right?

http://www.mychess.com/tactics/tact...

Sep-23-08  Tripler: Fischer flicked out 1.b3 against three young players: Andersson, Tukmakov and Mecking. The Mecking game transposed to a Bird's. He won them all. Maybe he just felt like a day off from mainline theory; more likely he just wanted to get these young players out of the book so they had to think for themselves.
Jan-26-09  UnsoundHero: ,There are a couple of reasons why Fischer played 34 Be5 rather than the flashy 34 Rxf5 & Rg7 and then sacrificing the queen:

* There's always the possibility of a mis-calculation. Fischer would be down a queen for a piece if black had a miracle defense. It's true that this would be extremely rare in Fischer's case, but he reasoned, correctly, that he didn't have to take this chance.

*Fischer himself admitted that he liked to "see his opponents squirm". It's almost as if he wanted to win the game as slowly as possible. I wonder if Anderrson actually squirmed after 34 Be5. Here he was, down one exchange, being threatened with another.

Fischer knew that he would eventually win after 34 Be5 without risk.

Aug-05-09  birthtimes: 34. Rxf5 gxf5 35. Rg7 Rd1+ 36. Kg2 Nf4+ 37. Qxf4 Qd5+ 38. Kh3 Rd4 39. Bxd4 Qe6 40. f7 Qxf7 41. Rxf7+ Kg8 42. Qxf5 a4 43. Rf8#
Aug-05-09  birthtimes: 34. Rxf5 gxf5 35. Qb5 Rd8 36. Qxf5 Re8 holds out longer than 36...Nf8 (much more than 7 moves).
Aug-05-09
Premium Chessgames Member
  shalgo: <if i remember correctly, yusupov used the Rg1 g4 strategy as black>

Here is the game, analyzed (as you mention) in Dvoretsky and Yusupov's "Positional Play."

Taimanov vs Yusupov, 1982

May-26-10
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <There are a couple of reasons why Fischer played 34 Be5 rather than the flashy 34 Rxf5 & Rg7 and then sacrificing the queen:

* There's always the possibility of a mis-calculation. Fischer would be down a queen for a piece if black had a miracle defense. It's true that this would be extremely rare in Fischer's case, but he reasoned, correctly, that he didn't have to take this chance.

*Fischer himself admitted that he liked to "see his opponents squirm". It's almost as if he wanted to win the game as slowly as possible. I wonder if Anderrson actually squirmed after 34 Be5. Here he was, down one exchange, being threatened with another.

Fischer knew that he would eventually win after 34 Be5 without risk.>

Or he just missed the combination. Nah, couldn't be.

Jun-01-12  kasparvez: This is indeed a phenomenal game! Not the usual direct and crystalline Fischer. The quality and level of brilliance is up there, but the character of play is more subtle, garbed and not immediately evident. Great lesson.
Aug-25-12  csmath: One of the most brilliant games Bobby played.Once the battery was in place the game was won. It is just plain amazing that human comes with something engine never would. But one needs to say that Andersoon, just like Taimanov shuffled pieces aimlessly not knowing how to counter strange setup.
Sep-21-12  nummerzwei: I didn't know these two have played.
Apr-13-13  Wyatt Gwyon: Fischer was just cocky as hell at this point in time, wasn't he? lol.
Apr-13-13  RookFile: It was a wonderful plan involving play on the g file that a lot of grandmasters took note of.
May-07-14  Strelets: 37...gxh5? would've led to a thunderous finish: 38.Qg8+!! Qxg8 39.f7+ Qg7 40.Bxg7#
May-07-14  Strelets: And the same theme works after 38...gxh5?: 39.Qg8+!! Qxg8 40.f7+ Qg7 (40...Ng7 41.fxg8=Q+ Kxg8 42.Rxg7+ Kh8 43.R anywhere on the g-file other than g8# On 40...Nf6, White simply has 41.fxg8=Q#) 41.fxe8=Q Rxe8 42.Bxg7+ Kg8 43.Bxf8+ and White's up a rook and a piece.
May-07-14
Premium Chessgames Member
  diceman: <1Tripler:
Maybe he just felt like a day off from mainline theory; more likely he just wanted to get these young players out of the book so they had to think for themselves.>

This game was basically a sicilian
a tempo ahead.

Mar-05-15  jerseybob: xrt999: Your remark is incredibly odd: who cares if Andersson was a GM at this exact moment in time? He was an up and coming young player who soon became a GM, just as Fischer himself had been early in his own career. Bobby obviously didn't feel demeaned by playing him; he fully understood the young man's potential.
Apr-14-15  cunctatorg: This game was a nightmare for Black; Fisher's white pieces seem to have an infinite number of resources...
Oct-01-16  Rookiepawn: <keypusher: <There are a couple of reasons why Fischer played 34 Be5 rather than the flashy 34 Rxf5 & Rg7 and then sacrificing the queen: * There's always the possibility of a mis-calculation. Fischer would be down a queen for a piece if black had a miracle defense. It's true that this would be extremely rare in Fischer's case, but he reasoned, correctly, that he didn't have to take this chance.

*Fischer himself admitted that he liked to "see his opponents squirm". It's almost as if he wanted to win the game as slowly as possible. I wonder if Anderrson actually squirmed after 34 Be5. Here he was, down one exchange, being threatened with another.

Fischer knew that he would eventually win after 34 Be5 without risk.>

Or he just missed the combination. Nah, couldn't be.>


click for larger view

OK, maybe he missed the combination, but to be fair, at this point Black's position is so terrible that there are many ways to win for White. Maybe the way Fischer wins is not so flashy, but it is still very attractive.

Being not a usual opening for Fischer, I think his logical, clear playing is still there. No dubious fuzzy variants, the attack on the K side seems very transparent and even announced... And still Black never finds counterplay.

Dec-24-16  izimbra: Some mention of Fischer vs. Mecking, on the main page, led me to look for games where Fischer played the Nimzo-Larsen as White. There were only a few, and Andersson was the highest level opponent I recognized. This game and the Mecking game are similar in the sense of fitting this description: Fischer has W around 1970 against an opponent he feels he can beat. He decides to go for a plan that will eventually give him a massive attack against the opponent K without any real risk of a loss. If Black played the best opening moves, N-L would probably increase chances of a draw, but it was less well known then and Fischer was playing it against opponents he didn't regard as offensive threats.

In that context, this exhibition game is kind of cool to see how Fischer puts on a caveman attack against a strong defensive player.

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