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Terry C Fox vs Jan Timman
"Fox Hunt" (game of the day Jan-25-2005)
Islington op (1970), Islington ENG
Nimzo-Indian Defense: Saemisch Variation. Accelerated (E24)  ·  0-1
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 3 OF 3 ·  Later Kibitzing>
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  landshark: The sequence beginning with 15....Nxe2 reminds me of Bobby Fischer's game of the century.
May-06-19  yadasampati: This one is definitely not "very easy"
May-06-19  stacase: <yadasampati: This one is definitely not "very easy"> When you see it right away, it is, and when you don't, it isn't (-:
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: a little tricky for a Monday puzzle.
May-06-19  et1: It is very beautiful. However it goes against the "rule" of the Queen sacs on Monday ! :) Have a great week.
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: I wonder when black realised he wasn't winning? I expect he was feeling pretty happy when he got to this position, with black to move:


click for larger view

The pin on the Nc3 seems to win a piece for white to offset the pawns he has lost. He must have been surprised when Timman sacced his queen with 15...Nxe2.

Black has so much fun with his active knights and rooks that he doesn't even need to capture the en prise Ba5.

Fun puzzle.

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  morfishine: Note: <20...Nf3> is not a deflection as previously noted

However, <21...Ng5> is a deflection since the only move for White is 22.Qxg5; and with the White Queen 'deflected' away from defending the critical square <f2>, Black finishes with <22...Nxf2#>

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Willber G: <Once: I wonder when black realised he wasn't winning?>

Typo, I presume?

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Sally Simpson: ***

Three piece Rook, Knight and Bishop 'Teamwork Mates' are always pleasing.

Note the role the unselfish Black Knights played. Each one trying to sacrifice itself so the other can deliver a checkmate.

Black has just played 20...Nd4-f3


click for larger view

21.Qxd3 Ng5 mate. White declined that Knight and played 21.Qe3 Ng5+


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That one has to be taken 22.Qxg5 Nf2 mate.

***

May-06-19  zb2cr: Nice. 21 ... Ng5+; 22. Qxg5, Nf2#.
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Diocletian: Black has a Bishop as strong as four Queens, so Black wins quickly.
May-06-19  schachfuchs: Poor hunted fox = fuchs ;-)
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  gawain: The move I saw was 21...Nxf2+ which seems to win but is vastly inferior to the forcing 21...Ng5+
May-06-19  drollere: i liked this puzzle for the odd combination of collaborating pieces. <sally simpson> pointed out the dynamics, but there is the soul of chess in the formation: checkmate delivered by a distant bishop, a rook hanging unprotected in outer space, and a knight horse that seems to have lost its way to the stable.
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: Here's a pleasing side puzzle.

If white plays 21 Rhf1, below, to prevent 21...Ng5+, what move(s) does black have to win that are better than 21...Nxd2.


click for larger view

May-06-19  Momentum Man: 21...Ng5+ unleashes the Beast of B7
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Once: <Willber G: Typo, I presume?>

Yup. Rusty!

May-06-19  Damenlaeuferbauer: Of course, my old friend Jan Hendrik, who was at that time enviable 18 years young, but today prefers a couple of glasses of exquisite red wine to an exhausting game of tournament chess, found the mate in two moves with 21.-,Ng5+ 22.Qxg5,Nxf2# The last time I saw him was in summer 1999 at the Rotterdam harbour, where he humbled the immortal Kasparov at his peak with the black pieces. Jan Hendrik was truly a giant in his best games. Cherio!
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  ajk68: This one took me a bit. At first, I was looking for a way to deflect the queen from protecting g5. Then I realized the trick was to deflect the queen from protecting f2!
May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 24 dpa

1. = / + (-0.68): 10.dxc5 Nxd1 11.Bxa5 Nxa5 12.Rxd1 Nb3 13.Nd4 Nxc5 14.Nb5 Ke7 15.g3 b6 16.Bg2 Bb7 17.0-0 f6 18.exf6+ gxf6 19.Bxb7 Nxb7 20.Rd4 Nc5 21.Re1 f5 22.Nd6 Kf6 23.Kg2 h6 24.Rh4 Rag8 25.f3 Rg6 26.Rd1 Rhg8 27.Kf2 Ra8 28.Rh5 Rf8 29.Rh4 Rfg8 30.Rh5 f4

2. - / + (-0.95): 10.d5 Nxd1 11.Bxa5 Nxa5 12.Rxd1 b6 13.Kd2 Bb7 14.Kc3 h6 15.Be2 0-0-0 16.Rhe1 Rhe8 17.Bf1 Kc7 18.g3 g5 19.Re3 g4 20.d6+ Kb8 21.Ne1 Rg8 22.h4 gxh3 23.Bxh3 Bc6 24.Bg2 Kb7 25.Bxc6+ Nxc6

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 21 dpa done

1. = / + (-0.57): 9.Bd3 Nxd2 10.Qxd2 cxd4 11.cxd4 Qxd2+ 12.Kxd2 Nxd4 13.Rb1 f6 14.exf6 gxf6 15.Be4 Ke7 16.Ne2 Nxe2 17.Kxe2 Rb8 18.c5 f5 19.Bf3 b6 20.cxb6 Ba6+ 21.Ke3 Rxb6 22.Rxb6 axb6 23.Rb1 b5 24.Rc1 Rc8 25.Rxc8 Bxc8 26.Be2 Bb7 27.g3 Bc6 28.Kf4 Kf6

2. = / + (-0.57): 9.Rb1 cxd4 10.cxd4 Nxd2 11.Qxd2 Qxd2+ 12.Kxd2 Nxd4 13.Bd3 f6 14.exf6 gxf6 15.Be4 Ke7 16.Ne2 Nxe2 17.Kxe2 Rb8 18.c5 f5 19.Bf3 b6 20.cxb6 Ba6+ 21.Ke3 Rxb6 22.Rxb6 axb6 23.Rb1 b5 24.Rc1 Rc8 25.Rxc8 Bxc8 26.Be2 Bb7 27.g3 Bc6 28.Kf4 Kf6

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 21 dpa

1. = / + (-0.36): 7.Ne2 Nxe4 8.Qd3 d5 9.cxd5 exd5 10.f3 Nf6 11.Bg5 0-0 12.Bxf6 gxf6 13.Kf2 c4 14.Qc2 Na6 15.g3 Nc7 16.Nf4 Re8 17.Be2 Bd7 18.Rhe1 Ba4 19.Qc1 Qb6 20.Rb1 Bb3 21.Kg2 Qd6

2. = / + (-0.68): 7.Qf3 d5 8.exd5 exd5 9.Qe3+ Be6 10.cxd5 Nxd5 11.Qd2 0-0 12.c4 Nb4 13.Rb1 Nc2+ 14.Kd1 Qxd2+ 15.Bxd2 Nxd4 16.Rxb7 Nbc6 17.Ne2 Rfb8 18.Rxb8+ Rxb8 19.Bc1 Nb3 20.Nf4 Nxc1 21.Kxc1 Rb3 22.Nxe6 fxe6 23.Kd2 Rxa3 24.Bd3 Ra2+ 25.Ke3 a5 26.Rb1 Nb4 27.Be4 a4 28.Rd1 a3 29.Rd8+ Kf7 30.Rd7+ Kf6

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier:


click for larger view

Analysis by Houdini 4 d 26 dpa done

1. = (0.11): 6.Nf3 0-0 7.Qc2 Nc6(T) 8.e3 h6 9.Bd3 b6 10.e4 d6 11.h3 e5 12.d5 Na5 13.Be3 Bb7 14.0-0 Qd7 15.Be2 Ba6 16.Nd2 Bb7 17.Rfe1 Rfe8 18.Rab1 Rad8 19.Nf3 Qe7 20.Rb5 Rd7

2. = (0.11): 6.Qc2 0-0 7.Nf3 Nc6(T)

May-06-19  TheaN: <Jimfromprovidence: Here's a pleasing side puzzle.

If white plays 21 Rhf1, below, to prevent 21...Ng5+, what move(s) does black have to win that are better than 21...Nxd2.>

Was looking at a lot of options but it seems that protecting g5 with 21....h6! or f6!? prevail over 21....Nxd2.

Interestingly though, 21....g5!? creates a forced sequence as Black's threatening g4: 22.Qxd3 g4+ 23.Kg2 Ne5+ -+ fairs similar as directly 21....Nxd2 in a different fashion.

However; if we realize that Black's up three pawns, even 21....Nxf2+?! wins, 22.Rxf2 Nxd2. Not really worth a mention as it just throws the Knight on d3. But it still wins.

In fact, it may be harder finding losing moves in that position.

May-06-19
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <TheaN> <Was looking at a lot of options but it seems that protecting g5 with 21....h6! or f6!? prevail over 21....Nxd2.

In fact, it may be harder finding losing moves in that position.>

Yes, I posted the position because I was a bit surprised that those two winning pawn moves you mentioned work the best.

You are fight, just about anything wins at this point. In fact, this is the evaluation for white's 21st move.

1) -14.27 (31 ply) 21.Qf4

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