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Sergey Karjakin vs Wang Yue
Baku Grand Prix (2008)  ·  Spanish Game: Berlin Defense. l'Hermet Variation Berlin Wall Defense (C67)  ·  0-1
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find similar games 12 more Karjakin/Wang Yue games
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Kibitzer's Corner
Apr-25-08  playerXchess: The only decisive game of round 5.
Apr-25-08  zoat22: karjakin and carlsen are playing at their usual level, quite a long way below adams, yue, mamedyarov, kamsky, etc.
Apr-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: With complete benefit of retrospection, white might have tried the subtle 36 Kf2!?, below.


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The intent is Kd3 and eventually Rg6+, forcing black's king to the a file and out of the action.

IMHO, it would have been an effective strategy for white to follow.

Apr-25-08  euripides: <Jim> nice idea. An important point is that the White king seems to be able to penetrate to d5. It then becomes a very close pawn race. One line is <36.Kf2> Ra3 37.Ke3 Rxb3+ 38.Ke4 Rc3 39.Rg6+ Kh5 40.Rxe6 Rxc4+ 41.Kd5 Rd4+ 42.Kc6 c4 (42....Kg5 43.Kxc7 Kf5 44.Rxb6 Kxe5 45.Kc6 c4 46.Kc5 c3 47.Rc3 c2 48.Rc3 Rd2 49.Kc4 Ke4 50.Kb3 looks drawn)43.Kxc7 b5 44.Rc6 b4 45.e6 b3 46.e7 Re4 47.e8=Q+ Rxe8 48.Rxc4 and White's king will get to the b pawn before the black king.
Apr-25-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: In my original post, after 36 Kf2, my post should have continued the intent is <Ke3>, not Kd3.
Apr-25-08  JuliusCaesar: zoat22 is kibitzing at his usual level, quite a long way below euripides, jimfromprovidence etc.
Apr-25-08  toastie: http://baku2008.fide.com/round-5-wa...

According to the fide site/

Mistakes include 25.Rd2? and 28.Bb2?

Wang replies 28...Bg5! (diagram)


click for larger view

As above said, 36.Rxe6? (36.Kf2! Ra3 37.Ke3! Rxb3+ 38.Ke4 Rc3 39.Rg6+! Kh5 40.Rxe6 Rxc4+ 41.Kf5)

35.Kg3 seems to offer little or no improvement.

Apr-26-08  Augalv: Karjakin Sergey - Wang Yue, Grand Prix Baku, 5th Round.

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Nf6 4.0-0 Nxe4 5.d4 Nd6 6.Bxc6 dxc6 7.dxe5 Nf5 8.Qxd8+ Kxd8 9.Nc3 Ke8 10.h3 Be7 11.g4 Nh4 12.Nxh4 Bxh4 13.Bf4 Be6 14.Kg2 Be7 15.Rfd1 Rd8 16.f3 h5 17.b3 ( diagram )


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17..a5N

New move, 17..b6 went into draw in Korneev Oleg - Fontaine Robert, Cap d'Agde 2002, 6th Round.Black is doing quite well here, how can White push his K side majority?!

18.Ne2?!

I think this is not good.Usual reaction on Black's a5 is a4, so why not 18.a4 stopping counterplay on Queenside? Or maybe I'm missing something...

18..a4 19.Nd4

Karjakin during press conference mentioned that here 19.Rxd8+ is better.If 19..Bxd8 20.Nd4 is good for White, if 19..Kxd8 then again 20.Nd4 is doing well.

19..Ra8! 20.Nxe6

20.Nf5 is shot in empty, simple 20..Bf8 with g6 to follow.

20..fxe6 ( diagram )


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This paws structure is good for Black.Equal position.

21.Bg3 g6 22.Be1 c5 23.c4 b6 24.Bc3 Kf7 ( diagram )


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25.Rd2??

Very bad move.Here we must stop to search other moves for White.25.Rd7!? is better with line like 25..axb3 26.axb3 Rxa1 27.Bxa1 Ra8 28.Bc3 Ra3 29.Be1 Ke8 30.Rxc7 Rxb3 with equal position.Perharps waiting move like 25.Kg3!? is worth to check.Move played in the game is total disaster.

25..axb3 26.axb3 Rxa1 27.Bxa1 Ra8 28. Bb2 Bg5! ( diagram )


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Very unpleasant move.

29.f4 Bxf4 30.Rf2 g5 31.Bc1 hxg4 32.hxg4 Kg6 33.Bxf4 gxf4 34.Rxf4 Kg5 ( diagram )


click for larger view

Hard to defend this position, three weak spots to defend.

35.Rf6

Logical move, trying to exchange as much as possible.If 35.Kg3 Rd8 or 36..Ra3 and pretty much goes into position from game.

35..Kxg4 36.Rxe6 Kf5 37.Re7 Ra3 38.e6 Rxb3 39.Kf2 Rb4 40.Rxc7 Kxe6 ( diagram )


click for larger view

41.Rh7

White can't approach with King, 41.Ke2?? Kd6 is winning right away.

41..Rxc4 42.Rh6+ Kd5 43.Rxb6 Re4! 44.Rb1 c4 45.Re1 c3 46.Rxe4 Kxe4 0-1

Extracted from blog about Sergey Karjakin.

http://www.karjakin.blogspot.com/

Apr-27-08
Premium Chessgames Member
  al wazir: 47. Ke2 Kd4 48. Ke1 (48. Kd1 Kd3) Ke3 (48...Kd3? 49. Kd1=) 49. Kd1 Kd3 50. Kc1 c2.
Apr-27-08  kurtdereli: i think karjakin could not forget this game
Apr-29-08  minasina: Rybka anlysis samples http://chessok.com/broadcast/live.p...
Apr-29-08  zoat22: <JuliusCaesar> is commenting at his usual level completely missing the point of the kibitzing... but what more could you expect from someone like him?
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