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Sergey Karjakin vs Magnus Carlsen
Carlsen - Karjakin World Championship (2016), New York, NY USA, rd 4, Nov-15
Spanish Game: Closed Variations (C84)  ·  1/2-1/2
ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

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Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 33 OF 33 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  bubuli55: I know. It's MC.
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: It "felt" like Black should be winning, but so far I've seen a demonstration of a forced win only at one point - after 42.Nf2? (this is also where Sesse's evaluations during the game broke the +2 zone and reached something like +4/5):


click for larger view

Black has the idea of <42...Bd5!> (instead of ...Kg6) leading to zugzwang rather shortly. A key point is that after 43.g3 g4! (somewhat counter-intuitive) the white knight is paralyzed, since 44.Nd1 loses to Bf3+ 45.Kd2 Bxd1 46.Kxd1 Bg5! and White can't do much against the plan of invading with the black king and playing ...f4.

Nov-16-16  Acrylion: right now ,I think Magnus is very comfortable and confident.The fireworks are about to commence.Although, Sergey does seem resourceful and solid. Feeling each other out.
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: Looks like about third round of Championship fight!
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Calli: It's not a good sign that Karjakin admits that he missed 18...Qc6 during his long think for 18. Bxh6? I was watching Peter Svidler and it was pretty much the first thing he considered analyzing the line realtime with no engine.
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: Btw, a nice line mentioned by Karjakin in the press conference that he did notice while thinking he was playing "brilliantly" with 18.Bxh6 was 18...Nxe4 19.Rxe4 f5 20.Rxc4!!.
Nov-16-16  maxiumburn: Did every one miss move? 18. ...Bb7xe4!
Qg2 Be4-d3,Bh6-c1 etc.
or Re1-e4 nf6 xe4, QxN PxB advantage white.
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  whiteshark: Press Conference Snippets: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujz...
Nov-16-16  Christoforus Polacco: What do yo think about : 39.... d5 (not 39...B:h4) ? It's possible : 40.Ng5 B:h4 41.N:f7 B:e7 42.Ne5
Nov-16-16  Albion 1959: A promising start to this match. No sign of early nerves. There have been no quick early draws here! Games three and four 78 and 94 moves respectively have given the public plenty of action and value for their money! More the same please!
Nov-16-16  Christoforus Polacco: Or 39... d5 40.Bf8 g6 41.Ng5 Be8 42.Nf3 B:h4 43.N:h4 K:h4 with different colors bishops.
Nov-16-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jambow: The game quality thus far has been very high. This game it seems like Karjakin just by the slimmest of margins held the position. That he could bodes well that he had to not so much...

He needs to get into a position where Magnus feels the pressure and he gets to solve puzzles. Not easy against this one. 8 games anything could happen... Cubs won, Trump won and the Brits left too. Long shots are having quite a year.

Nov-17-16  you vs yourself: <Eyal> During the game, I felt 42..Bd5 was more logical also hitting g2 and gaining more control on e4. But after 45.Nd1, Magnus didn't go for 45..fxg4. If he didn't prefer that then, I thought maybe he didn't want 43.g4 (instead of g3 in your line)
Nov-17-16  seeminor: Caruana tweeted,
"So 42...Bd5 43.g3 g4!! probably would have won for Carlsen in the 4th game, but not easy to find and convert the advantage"
Nov-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal: <you vs yourself> But with the bishop on d5 (so that it can come to f3 immediately, and White can't maneuver the knight to e3) that's much better for Black - he should be winning quite comfortably after 42...Bd5 43.g4 fxg4.
Nov-17-16  Open Defence: It would be interesting to hear Carlsen's thoughts on 42...Bd5 if he had considered it and if so why he dismissed it
Nov-17-16  Ulhumbrus: 18...Qc6!! responds to the capture ( and sacrifice) 18 Bxh6 not by recapturing a pawn but by threatening to recapture it. That means that 18...Qc6 can be regarded as the first of a pair of moves, a pair of which the second consists of the capture ...Nxe4. It can be considered an improvement on an immediate 18...Nxe4, and much more difficult to find or foresee than an immediate 18...Nxe4.
Nov-17-16  you vs yourself: <Eyal> I asked live what engine preferred and they all said 42..kg6. What is the plan behind Kg6 that both Magnus and engines liked?
Nov-17-16  mistreaver: Game for analysis here http://www.chessentials.com/carlsen... Kudos to <Eyal> for some fantastic discoveries, as usual. What is your chess strength. Do you have a title, if i may ask?
Nov-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: According to Romanian GM Dorian Rogozenco in his analysis of this game at http://en.chessbase.com/post/newsbl..., the defending champion missed a win with 45...f4?!

Instead, 45...Be6! 46. Kf1 fxg4 (-6.37 @ 65 depth, Stockfish 121116), according to Rogozenco, "must be winning.

P.S.: I would suggest 45...Be6!, preparing to liquidate the White pawn on g4 and create a passed pawn, is a move that could be played on general positional endgame principles. However, since a similar suggestion in game 3 caused a bit of controversy, I'll keep that opinion to myself :)

Nov-17-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: In the video of the post match analysis of game four (see link at chessbase link in my post above), Karjakin stated he was expecting Carlsen to play 45...Be6! and did not think White could hold after that move.
Nov-19-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  cormier: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbq... game 4 k - c
Dec-21-16  talwnbe4: 45.. Be6! looks like it wins
45..Be6 46. gxf5+ Kxf5 47. Bb8 Kg4 48. Ne3+ Kh3 49. Nc2 Bd7 50. Ne3 Bc5 51. Nf1 g4 52. Ng3 Kg2 53. Nh5 Bc6 54. Nf4+ Kg1 55. Nh5 Bf3+ 2.7 but even Stockfish had trouble finding 48.. Kh3
Dec-21-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Eyal:


click for larger view

Giri's analysis of Black's winning method from New In Chess:

<45...Be6! and White is in some kind of zugzwang. Amongst other issues: 46.Nf2 (46. gxf5+ Kxf5! 47. Bd6 Bf7 and the king penetrates: 48. Nf2 Bh5+ 49. Ke1 Bf3 50. Bg3 Be3 and wins; or 46. a4 f4 47. Kf3 Bd7 48. Bd4 Bxa4 49. Nf2 Bxd4 50. cxd4 c3 51. bxc3 Bb5 and wins; or 46. Bd6 f4 47. Kf3 Kf6 48. Bb8 Bd7 49. Bd6 Ba4 50. Nf2 Bxf2 51. Kxf2 Bd1, winning) 46... Bd7!>


click for larger view

<This is a lot stronger than taking the pawn, when White still retains some hope of a fortress. Another zugzwang - if the bishop leaves the e5-h8 diagonal, ...f4! will win because there won't be Bd4. 47.Bd4 (White has many moves, but they all make his position worse than it already is; for instance, 47. Nd1 f4 48. Kf3 Ba4 49. Ke2 f3+ 50. Ke1 Bxd1 51. Kxd1 a4, or 47. gxf5+ Kxf5!) 47...Bc7! and there is no longer any hope of setting up a blockade to stop the g-pawn. Not to mention the idea of Bf4-Bc1.>

Mar-10-17  nummerzwei: 45...f4 is a strange move, leaving Black with no entry squares.

Alekhine did better in a strikingly similar ending in Shipley / Sharp vs Alekhine, 1924


click for larger view

42...Be2! (0:1, 53)

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