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Hans-Joachim Federer
  
Number of games in database: 1
Years covered: 2001
Last FIDE rating: 2004
Highest rating achieved in database: 2043


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HANS-JOACHIM FEDERER
(born Oct-13-1950, 67 years old) Germany

[what is this?]

 page 1 of 1; one game  PGN Download 
Game  ResultMoves YearEvent/LocaleOpening
1. L Krizsany vs H J Federer 1-0242001Bad WoerishofenE73 King's Indian

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 189 OF 189 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Sounds like a rehash of the movie "Wimbledon" with Kirsten Dunst and Paul Bettany.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Nadal vs a prime Sampras.

Who'd win?

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: On clay Nadal would win easily. On a fast grass court Sampas would wn easily. On today's grass it would be a battle but I would go with Sampras.

On hard courts and indoor it would be very close.

Sampras' advantage is the strength of his serve. Not just the power but the accuracy. And his second serve was as strong as many other players' first serves.

Nadal's advantage is that he just doesn't miss unless forced to. And he's so fast he attacks balls he should be shoveling back defensively.

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: < saffuna: On clay Nadal would win easily. On a fast grass court Sampas would wn easily. On today's grass it would be a battle but I would go with Sampras. On hard courts and indoor it would be very close.

Sampras' advantage is the strength of his serve. Not just the power but the accuracy. And his second serve was as strong as many other players' first serves.

Nadal's advantage is that he just doesn't miss unless forced to. And he's so fast he attacks balls he should be shoveling back defensively.>

Nadal sounds kind of like prime Andre Agassi. Is that right, or am I completely off base (or over the service line, as the case may be)?

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: I was thinking that, but Nadal is consistently better. And is almost unbeatable on clay courts: 10 French champioships.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: Rafael Nadal is like an Andre Agassi, but on steroids.

Relentless pursuit of the ball, and his phenomenal fitness is way superior over what Agassi did at his best.

Plus he's a freaking lefty.

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: And puts topspn on a ball like nobody ever.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <chancho> <jim> Thanks!
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: well, here's the trailer for "Borg vs McEnroe":

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Igf...>

I don't think it will be as good as the movie coming out about King vs Riggs. The guy playing Riggs is great, really inhabits the part:

<https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3N...>

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: <keypusher> <chancho><hmm> If you want to see some really entertaining, high quality tennis between players with contrasting styles, watch any of the three Rafter-Agassi Wimbledon semis from 1999-2001. Just great play.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  chancho: I went and checked Rafter vs Federer and the Aussie had a 3-0 match record.

Roger wasn't <THE FED> yet.

Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Henman had a good career record vs. Federer, once leading him 6-1. Asked about it later Henman said, "It helps when you start playing him when he's 12."
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Graf turned pro at age 13 and that's when most female pros beat her. By age 17 she was invincible.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Keyser Soze: Wow, interesting movie..About Wimbledon 80 finals? Those were the times..A very young Lendl playing..Connors and McEnroe at one semis .And an Epic final.
Sep-12-17  savagerules: I was at a tennis tournament it must have been 1980 or 1981 and there was a 14 or 15 year old girl named Andrea Jaeger with a long blonde pigtail like Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm who demolished all the veterans with a mix of moon balls and short sliced shots and people ended up booing her even though she kept winning because she made the other players look like fools with her tactics. Apparently she had daddy issues and retired a few years later and became a nun later.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Andrea the future nun, Jaeger. She left tennis quite early to do charity work and is now a nun.
Sep-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: "Daddy issues."

Riiight.

Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: She had a chronic bad shoulder, had a couple of surgeries, but it was hopeless, in her words. Same thing happened to Brian Bosworth, highly touted linebacker from Oklahoma, an AJ Watts/Rob Gronkowski type guy, outspoken, bigger than life.

You may be thinking of Mary Pearce, who's foul mouthed father was banned from women's tennis events because he physically threatened people in the stands, was loud and abusive.

Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  keypusher: <Borg v McEnroe> Might be interesting, has some good people in it. Nice to see that Shia Laboeuf was able to get a movie made, though checking wiki he still seems to have a lot of problems.

Can't believe Andrea Jaeger became a nun...she seems to have left her order, though. Does that mean she divorced Jesus Christ?

Sep-13-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  saffuna: Jaeger's older sister Suzy played on the Stanford tennis team, and Andrea visited a couple of times. Seemed like a nice kid, a little shy, only 17-18 years old. Backcourt player, long rallies, didn't miss.
Sep-24-17  chessmoron: Federer teams up with Nadal and gives the tennis world a sensational doubles exhibition win against Querrey and Sock.

Highlights from the inagural Laver Cup (World v Europe): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR5...

Oct-16-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Keyser Soze: I saw..very intense atmosphere. Kyorgios got really sad after that painful loss. And Federer is finally getting past Nadal consistently.
Oct-30-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: the grinning assassin bows out. Martina Hingis retires for a third and final time, at age 37.

<https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/29/...>

Nov-04-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  Keyser Soze: Breathtaking, Filip Krajnovic came from qualifying and got a spot in the Master 1000 final.
Nov-12-17
Premium Chessgames Member
  HeMateMe: Greatest indoor player of all time?

<Lendl was 341-70: a winning percentage of 83, which ranks second in the Open era indoors. McEnroe was 419-72: a winning percentage of 85.3, which ranks first by a significant margin, and he won five WCT Finals, which were the prestigious culmination of the WCT circuit, a rival of the traditional tour.

The only other men with an Open era winning percentage over 80 percent indoors in singles are Connors at 82 percent (469-103), Federer and Bjorn Borg at 80.6 percent (216-52).

Boris Becker, a tremendous indoor player, is next and close at 79.8 percent (297-75). And then there is Pete Sampras, whose five-set victory over Becker in Hanover, Germany, in the 1996 ATP final is the best indoor match this correspondent has seen in person. Sampras was 213-61 (77.7 percent) and won five year-end championships.

But with or without the Grand Slam factor, the career indoor records from this era do not quite match up with those of the best players earlier in the Open era like John McEnroe and Ivan Lendl. They played more often indoors then. There were 19 indoor events in the first year of the ATP Tour in 1990. That was down to 15 this year. Consider that Jimmy Connors won 53 career indoor titles and McEnroe won 52. Federer has won 23, Djokovic just 12.

The playing conditions then were also generally much quicker.>

the author's conclusion is that the best indoor court players of the 80s were a little (slightly) more dominant than Federer and Jkokovic.

Surprising to me; I reasoned that McEnroe had enough bad years, due to age and poor training habits to cancel out some of his best years when young. I thought Sampras and Becker would have a better percentage than Mac, and that Federer would be better than all of them.

Apparently McEnroe was so dominant indoors when young he is able to handle some extra losses when older. Of course he also played fewer matches when out of his prime. Different racquets and strings, so it's just apples and oranges, I guess. I think the game required more skill, greater shot making ability, when the racquets and strings were less lively, back in the 70s and early 80s.

<https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/11/...>

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