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Annotations v.07: WCC Tournament 2007
Compiled by chessmoron
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#1: <1 Nf3 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 g3 d5 4 d4 dxc4 5 Bg2> Letting Black retain the extra pawn. White could recover it with 5 Qa4+. <5a6 6 Ne5 Bb4+ 7 Nc3 Nd5 8 0-0!?> A new idea, offering two more pawns. Usual is 8 Bd2 b5 9 0-0 Bxc3 10 bxc3 0-0 11 a4, with about even chances. <80-0> Morozevich sensibly rejects the greedy 8. . . Nxc3 9 bxc3 Bxc3 10 Rb1 Qxd4, as White gets ample compensation from 11 Qa4+ b5 12 Qc2. Note that 8. . . b5? would drop the extra pawn, to 9 Nxd5 exd5 10 Nxc4! bxc4 11 Qa4+. <9 Qc2 b5> Again, a good choice in a tricky position undoubtedly analyzed at home by the world champion. The alternatives 9. . . Nb6 10 Rd1 and 9. . . Bxc3 10 bxc3 b5 11 e4 Nb6 12 f4 look more promising for White. <10 Nxd5 exd5 11 b3> Threatening to capture twice on c4. <11c6 12 e4 f6> Sharpest. Black can also consider 12. . . Be6 and 12. . . Ra7. <13 exd5> White must sacrifice a piece, as 13 Nf3? dxe4 14 Qxe4 Re8 15 Qc2 Be6 gives Black a safe position and the extra pawn. <13fxe5> Black is committed! Backing out, with 13. . . cxd5 14 bxc4 Bb7 (or 14. . . bxc4 15 Nxc4) 15 Nd3, cedes White an undisputed edge. <14 bxc4 exd4> After 14. . . Bd6 15 dxc6 Ra7 16 c5 Be7 17 d5, White's pawns are more valuable than Black's Knight. <15 dxc6 Be6!?> Welcoming 16 c7 Qxc7 17 Bxa8 bxc4, with plenty for the exchange. Instead, Black could hang on to material by 15. . . Ra7 16 Qb3 Bc3 17 cxb5+ Raf7. Then the plausible 18 b6 Nxc6!? 19 Bxc6 Bxa1 20 Ba3 Bc3 21 Bxf8 Kxf8 22 b7 Bxb7 23 Bxb7 leads to a draw. Another sequence, 15. . . Bc3 16 cxb5 Be6 17 c7 Qxc7 18 Bxa8 d3 19 Qb1 Bxa1 20 Qxa1 axb5, also produces equality. <16 cxb5 d3?> Finally Black goes wrong. The position remains obscure after 16. . . Ra7. <17 c7! Qd4 18 Qa4 Nd7> Not 18. . . Qxa1? 19 Qxb4 or 18. . . d2? 19 Bxd2 Qxd2 20 Bxa8. <19 Be3 Qd6 20 Bxa8 Rxa8 21 Bf4?> Correct is 21 Rc1 or 21 Qxa6. <21Qf8?> Much tougher is 21...Qd5, setting the trap 22 Qxb4?? Qf3!. <22 b6!> Relying on the double attack 22. . . Nxb6 23 Qc6. <22Ne5> Trying to swindle his way out of a lost position. <23 Bxe5 Qf3> Threatening 24. . . Bh3. <24 Qd1 Qe4 25 b7> Anticipating 25. . . Qxb7 26 Qxd3 Bh3 27 f3 Bxf1 28 Rxf1, when the c-pawn is decisive. <Rf8 26 c8=Q Bd5 27 f3, 1-0.>

#2: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nf3 d5 4 Nc3 c6. 5 Bg5 h6 6 Bh4 dxc4 7 e4 g5> The lines beginning 7 . . . b5 8 e5 g5 9 Nxg5 have been analyzed past move 30. <8 Bg3 b5> A standard modern battleground. Black has an extra pawn, White has quicker development and more central control. <9 Ne5 h5 10 h4 g4 11 Be2 Bb7 12 0-0 Nbd7 13 Qc2 Nxe5 14 Bxe5 Bg7 15 Rad1> Four rounds later, Grischuk tried 15 Bg3 Qxd4 16 Rfd1 against Svidler. <0-0 16 Bg3 Nd7 17 f3?!> This thrust could be timed better with 17 e5 f5 18 exf6 Qxf6 19 f3. Or, if 17 e5 Qb6, then 18 Ne4 c5 19 Ng5 f5 20 exf6 Nxf6 21 Be5 gives White serious threats. <17c5!?> Anand credited this novelty to his second, Danish GM Peter Heine Nielsen. <18 dxc5> Also reasonable is 18 Nxb5 cxd4 19 Qxc4. <18Qe7> Black foresees an attack after 19 Bd6 Qxh4 20 fxg4 (not 20 Bxf8?? g3) Nxc5 21 Bxc5? Be5, but White should draw with 21 g3! Qg5 (or 21. . . Qh3 22 Rf2) 22 Bf4 Qe7 23 Bd6 Qg5 24 Bf4. <19 Kh1 a6 20 a4 Bc6 21 Nd5?!> White should settle for a small disadvantage by 21 fxg4 hxg4 22 Bxg4 Nxc5. <21exd5 22 exd5 Be5!> A subtle idea, both simpler and more effective than the many complicated alternatives. <23 f4> Forced, as 23 Bxe5 permits 23. . . Qxh4+ 24 Kg1 Nxe5, still menacing . . . g4-g3. <23Bg7> Anand explained that he wanted to keep the Bishop at e2 from working. The best players make chess look so easy! <24 dxc6 Nxc5> Threatening 25 . . . Ne4 26 Be1 g3. <25 Rd5 Ne4 26 Be1 Qe6!> White would parry 26 . . . g3? with 27 Rxh5. <27 Rxh5 f5> Winning. The Rook is doomed. <28 Kh2 Rac8 29 Bb4 Rfe8> Thinking of . . . Ne4-f6. <30 axb5 axb5 31 Re1 Qf7 32 Rg5 Nxg5 33 fxg5 Rxc6 34 Bf1 Rxe1 35 Bxe1 Re6 36 Bc3 Qc7+ 37 g3> After 37 Kg1 Qc5+ 38 Kh2 Bxc3, White cannot stand 39 bxc3 Re1 or 39 Qxc3 Qf2. <37Re3 38 Qg2 Bxc3 39 bxc3 f4 40 Qa8+ Kg7 41 Qa6 fxg3+, 0-1.> Next 42 . . . Qf7 will end resistance.

#3: <1 Nf3 d5 2 d4 Nf6 3 c4 c6 4 Nc3 e6 5 Bg5 h6 6 Bh4 dxc4 7 e4 g5 8 Bg3 b5 9 Be2 Bb7 10 h4 g4 11 Ne5 h5> Reaching the same position as Aronian-Anand. <12 0-0 Nbd7 13 Qc2 Nxe5 14 Bxe5 Bg7 15 Bg3!?> Aronian tried 15 Rad1. <15Qxd4> Else White follows with 16 e5 and 17 Ne4. <16 Rfd1 Qc5> Hoping to retreat to e7. <17 Bd6 Qb6 18 a4> White's initiative is probably worth two pawns. <18a6 19 e5 Nd7> After 19Nd5 20 Ne4, Black has less chance of freeing his QB with c6-c5. If 20Bf8 21 a5, neither 21Qa7 22 b3 cxb3 23 Qxb3 nor 21Qd8 22 Nf6+ Nxf6 23 Bxf8 Nd5 24 Bg7 Rg8 25 Qh7 Kd7 26 Bf6 Qf8 27 Qxh5 activates Black's pieces. <20 a5 Qa7 21 Ne4 c5> Most logical. Black cannot stand 21Nxe5?? 22 Bc5 Qb8 23 Nd6+ or 21Bxe5?? 22 Bxe5 Nxe5 23 Qc3 Ng6 24 Qg7! Rd8 25 Rxd8+ Kxd8 26 Qxf7. But 210-0-0!? 22 Be7 (or 22 b3) Bxe5 23 Bxd8 Rxd8 seems playable. Chances are about even after 24 Nd6+ Bxd6 25 Rxd6 c5 26 Rad1 Bd5 27 R1xd5! exd5 28 Qf5. <22 Ng5> Threatening 23 Nxe6. <22Nxe5> Fearless! Also critical is 22Bd5 23 Rxd5 exd5 24 e6, when the emergency evacuation 240-0-0! keeps equality. <23 Bxe5 Bxe5 24 Bxc4!> Intending 25 Bxe6. Black cannot survive 24Rh6? 25 Nxf7! Kxf7 26 Qf5+ Ke8 27 Bxe6 Bf6 28 Rd7, and 24Bc8 hardly inspires confidence. One reply is 25 Bd5 exd5 26 Rxd5. <24bxc4 25 Qa4+ Kf8> The problem with 25Bc6? 26 Qxc6+ Ke7 is 27 Nxf7! Kxf7 28 Rd7+. <26 Rd7 Bd5!> Necessary to defend f7. <27 Rd1! Bd4> Not 27Bxb2? because 28 R1xd5! exd5 29 Qc6! Kg8 30 Rxa7 Rxa7 31 Qb6 Rd7 32 Qxb2 wins material. <28 Rxa7 Rxa7> Black has enough for the Queen. The game remains tense and balanced. <29 b3!> Counting on 29cxb3 30 Rxd4 cxd4 31 Qxd4, although it's doubtful White can win after 31Rb7 32 Qxh8+ Ke7 33 Qb2 f6. <29Kg7 30 bxc4 Ba8> Black has absorbed a lot of punches but he's still upright. <31 Qc2 g3 32 Rxd4 cxd4 33 Qe2 gxf2+ 34 Qxf2 Rd8> Easier is 34e5 35 Qg3 f6. White gets no more than a draw from 36 Ne4+ Kf7 37 Nxf6 Kxf6 38 Qg5+ Kf7 39 Qf5+ Kg8 40 Qg6+ Rg7 or 36 Ne6+ Kh6 37 Qf2 Rf7 38 Ng5 Rff8 39 Ne6 Rf7. <35 Qg3 Kf8> Not 35Kh8? 36 Qe5+ Kg8 37 Nxe6! fxe6 38 Qg5+. <36 Qe5 Ke8?> Time pressure mars a superb fight. The correct 36Rad7! 37 Qh8+ Ke7 38 Qg7 d3 39 c5 Re8! makes White seek a draw by 40 Qxf7+ Kd8 41 Nxe6+ Rxe6 42 Qxe6 d2 43 Qf6+. <37 Nxe6?> Both players overlook that 37 Qh8+ Ke7 38 Qg7 Rf8 39 Nxe6! wins for White. <37fxe6 38 Qh8+ Ke7> Not 38Kd7?? 39 Qxd4+. <39 Qg7+ Ke8> Again, 39Kd6?? 40 Qxd4+ loses. <40 Qh8+> Also 40 Qxa7 d3 41 Qxa6 d2 42 Qxe6+ Kf8 draws. <40Ke7 41 Qg7+, -.>

#4: <1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 g3 d5 4 Bg2 Be7 5 Nf3 0-0 6 0-0 dxc4 7 Qc2 a6 8 Qxc4 b5 9 Qc2 Bb7> This system solves Black's perennial problem of how to develop his QB. If he manages to trade his backward c-pawn by . . . c7-c5xd4, he should attain equality. <10 Bd2 Be4 11 Qc1 Qc8 12 Bg5 Nbd7> Not bad is 12. . . c5. <13 Qf4> New but harmless. As Black four rounds earlier against Aronian, Kramnik met the natural 13 Nbd2 with 13. . . Bb7 14 Nb3 a5 15 Bxf6 Bxf6 16 Nc5 Bd5 17 e4 Bc4 and quickly drew. <13Bb7 14 Rc1 Bd6 15 Qh4 h6 16 Bxf6> After 16 Bf4 g5 17 Bxg5 hxg5 18 Qxg5+ Kh8 19 Qh6+, Black should avoid 19. . . Nh7? 20 Ng5 Ndf6 21 e4 and accept repetition with 19. . . Kg8. <Nxf6 17 Nbd2 Re8 18 e4 Nd7 19 Nb3 a5> Now White should keep an edge with 20 a4. <20 Nc5?> Probably Kramnik overlooked the reply. <20Be7! 21 Qf4 e5! 22 Nxe5!?> Making the best of it. Instead, 22 Qf5 Nxc5 23 dxc5 Qxf5 24 exf5 Bf6 25 Nd2 Bxg2 26 Kxg2 e4 27 Rc2 is uncomfortably passive. <22Nxe5 23 dxe5> Forced. White would drop material with 23 Qxe5? Bg5 24 Qf5 Qxf5 25 exf5 Bxc1 26 Bxb7 Bxb2, as 27 Rb1 Bxd4 28 Bxa8 Rxa8 29 Rxb5? runs into 29. . . c6. <23Bg5 24 Qf3 Bxc1 25 Rxc1 Rxe5?!> Natural, but Black's advantage vanishes. Correct is 25. . . Bc6. <26 Qc3 f6?!> Leko does not adjust to the changed situation. He should settle for equality with 26. . . Re7 27 Nxb7 Qxb7 28 e5 Qa7 29 Bxa8 Qxa8 30 Rd1 Qe4. <27 Qb3+ Kh8?> The third inaccuracy proves fatal. <28 Qf7!> Suddenly White has a deadly initiative. <28Bc6 29 Nd3 Re6> If Black had played 27. . . Kh7, he could hold with 29. . . Be8! 30 Qf8 Rh5. <30 Nf4 Rd6> Or 30. . . Bd7? 31 Nh5! Qg8 32 Qxd7. <31 Ng6+ Kh7 32 e5! fxe5> White refutes 32. . . Be8 by 33 Nf8+ Kh8 34 Qe7 fxe5 35 Bxa8! (not 35 Rxc7?? Rd1+ 36 Bf1 Qg4) Qxa8 36 Ne6 Rxe6 37 Qxe6. <33 Bxc6> Inviting 33. . . Rxg6 34 Be4 Raa6 35 Rxc7 Qg8 36 Qd7, threatening h2-h4-h5. <32Rf6 34 Qd5 Qf5> Also hopeless is 34. . . Rb8 35 Nxe5. <35 Bxa8 Qxf2+ 36 Kh1 Qxb2 37 Qc5 Kxg6> Against 37. . . Rf2, quickest is 38 Nf4!, setting up 39 Be4+. <38 Be4+ Kh5 39 Rb1, 1-0.>

#5: <1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6 5 Nc3 Nc6 6 Bg5 e6 7 Qd2 a6 8 0-0-0 Bd7 9 f3> A recently fashionable alternative to the customary 9 f4. <9Be7 10 Be3> Making way for g2-g4-g5. <10h5!?> Thwarting White's attacking idea, but almost giving up on castling. <11 Kb1 Qc7 12 Nxc6!?> New. White has tried 12 Bd3 and 12 h3 h4 13 Bd3. <12bxc6> If 12Bxc6, White probably intended 13 Ne2 and 14 Nd4. <13 Bf4 e5 14 Bg5 Be6?!> Tougher is 14Rb8. <15 Bxf6 gxf6> Black gets negligible compensation from 15Bxf6?! 16 Qxd6 Qb7 17 Be2. <16 f4! a5> After 16exf4, either 17 Qxf4 or 17 Ne2 favors White. And 16f5 is risky because 17 fxe5 dxe5 18 exf5 Bxf5 19 Bc4 leaves Black's King without shelter. <17 f5 Bd7 18 a4> Black's central pawns look impressive, but White will restrain d6-d5 while stifling Black on the Queenside. <18Rb8 19 Bc4 Rb4 20 Bb3 Qb6 21 Rhe1 Rd4> Alternatives are equally ineffective. Morozevich, one of the most aggressive GMs, has been quietly throttled. <22 Qe2 Rxd1+ 23 Rxd1 Qc5 24 Rd3!> Inviting 24Qg1+ 25 Ka2 Qxh2, as 26 Rh3 Qg1 27 Rxh5 takes aim at h7. For example, 27Rxh5 28 Qxh5 Qxg2 loses to 29 Bxf7+ Kd8 30 Qh8+ Kc7 31 Qa8. <24h4 25 Rh3 Bd8> White meets 25d5 strongly with 26 Qg4 Qf2 28 Qg7 Rf8 29 exd5 Bxf5 30 Rf3. <26 Ka2 Kf8 27 Qe1> Conquering h4 begins the invasion. <27Be8 28 Rxh4 Rxh4 29 Qxh4 Qg1> The illusion of counterplay. <30 Qh8+ Ke7 31 h4!> The bottled-up Bishops cannot deal with the h-pawn. <31d5 32 exd5 Qxg2 33 h5, 1-0.> White will obtain a second queen after 33e4 34 h6 e3 35 Qg7.

#1
Kramnik vs Morozevich, 2007 
(E04) Catalan, Open, 5.Nf3, 27 moves, 1-0

#2
Aronian vs Anand, 2007  
(D44) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 41 moves, 0-1

#3
Grischuk vs Svidler, 2007 
(D44) Queen's Gambit Declined Semi-Slav, 41 moves, 1/2-1/2

#4
Kramnik vs Leko, 2007 
(E06) Catalan, Closed, 5.Nf3, 39 moves, 1-0

#5
Leko vs Morozevich, 2007 
(B67) Sicilian, Richter-Rauzer Attack, 7...a6 Defense, 8...Bd7, 33 moves, 1-0

5 games

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