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Wilhelm Steinitz vs Mikhail Chigorin
Steinitz - Chigorin World Championship Match (1889), Havana CUB, rd 6, Jan-29
Queen Pawn Game: Anti-Torre (D02)  ·  0-1

ANALYSIS [x]

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Kibitzer's Corner
May-30-07  paladin at large: These two are fun - but some bad decisions by Steinitz here. The advance pawn group got no chaperones and it looks grim for white by move 22. Pretty finish by Chigorin.
Feb-28-08  Knight13: <After 7. Kxd1> Wow, nice pawn structure!
Aug-21-10  soothsayer8: What a fierce game. The endgame was reached by move 18! Some games are just getting out of their openings around then. Beautiful finish by Chigorin, Kings got no choice but to allow himself to be pinned to his queen and black's pawn on c6 is easily promoted.
Oct-30-10  chowie01: soothsayer8: What a fierce game. The endgame was reached by move 18! Some games are just getting out of their openings around then. Beautiful finish by Chigorin, Kings got no choice but to allow himself to be pinned to his queen and black's pawn on c6 is easily promoted.

Actually, the king's got no choice but to allow himself to be skewered to his queen. In this case, the queen is lost and there's no need to try to promote the pawn on c6. Also, once chigorin takes the queen, steinitz will probably take the c6 pawn anyway.

May-01-18
Premium Chessgames Member
  Big Pawn: Chigorin wins a game that finally demonstrates how his chess philosophy could dominate Steinitz’ chess philosophy. Whereas the previous games were decided by blunders, this game is a gradual grinding down of Steinitz and a triumph for the Chigorin school.

Chigorin spends a tempo to give up the bishop and allow white to have pawns in the center. However, like the hypermoderns of a generation later, he controlled a central square, d4, with his pieces and used it as a way to infiltrate White’s position. White’s somewhat vulnerable king gave black just enough initiative to keep him off balance. In the endgame, Chigorin demonstrated that his knight was better than Steinitz’ bishop.

He won using his method in all three phases of the game. Steinitz’ didn’t seem to know, at this point, how exactly to deal with Chigorin’s anti-Steinitz system, which is the precursor to the hypermodern era.

Apr-25-20  joddon: beautiful counting indeed by Chigorin!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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