chessgames.com
Members · Prefs · Laboratory · Collections · Openings · Endgames · Sacrifices · History · Search Kibitzing · Kibitzer's Café · Chessforums · Tournament Index · Players · Kibitzing

Rudolf Spielmann vs Moisei Elyashiv
"General Hellraising" (game of the day May-06-2016)
Munich (1903), Munich GER
King's Gambit: Accepted. Allgaier Gambit Urusov Attack (C39)  ·  1-0

ANALYSIS [x]

FEN COPIED

Click Here to play Guess-the-Move
Given 32 times; par: 30 [what's this?]

Annotations by Stockfish (Computer).      [18102 more games annotated by Stockfish]

explore this opening
find similar games 1,224 more games of Spielmann
sac: 6.Nxf7 PGN: download | view | print Help: general | java-troubleshooting

TIP: Some games have photographs. These are denoted in the game list with the icon.

PGN Viewer:  What is this?
For help with this chess viewer, please see the Olga Chess Viewer Quickstart Guide.
PREMIUM MEMBERS CAN REQUEST COMPUTER ANALYSIS [more info]

THIS IS A COMPUTER ANNOTATED SCORE.   [CLICK HERE] FOR ORIGINAL.

Kibitzer's Corner
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: Normally, demolition combinations involve sacrificing material to capture pawns on ranks adjacent to an enemy King for the purpose of exposing him to a withering attack.

Today's Friday solution 16. Rxf3! demonstrates such a demolition of pawn structure, for the purpose of exposing a bare naked King to attack, can be just as effective against over-extended pawns on distant ranks.

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: For a Black improvement, 8...Ke8 as in G Marco vs Pillsbury, 1903 looks good for the second player.
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: White is a knight down.

Black threatens 16... Qxg3.

The first idea that comes to mind is 16.Rxf3, to expose the black king and gain mobility:

A) 16... gxf3 17.Qxf3

A.1) 17... Rh7 18.Qf7+ Kh8 19.Qxg8#.

A.2) 17... Qe7 18.Nh5+ Kg6 (18... Kh7 19.Qe4+ Bf5 20.Qxf5#) 19.Be4+ Bf5 20.Qxf5#.

A.3) 17... Qxd4+ 18.Be3 Qxd5 (or 18... Qxe3+ 20.Qxe3) 19.Qxd5 followed by Rf1 and, in spite of the more or less balanced material [Q+P vs R+B+N], White seems to get a winning position because four pieces and a pawn can attack the black king and almost every black piece is still on its original square.

A.4) 17... Nf6 18.Nh5+

A.4.a) 18... Nxh5 19.Qf7#.

A.4.b) 18... Qxh5 19.Qxf6+ Kh7 20.Bf7

A.4.b.i) 20... Qxf7 21.Qxf7#.

A.4.b.ii) 20... Qg4 21.Qxh6#.

A.4.b.iii) 20... Bg4 21.Bxh5 Bxh5 22.Bxh6 Rg8 23.Bg5 Rg6 24.Qf7+ looks winning (24... Kh8 25.Bf6+; 24... Rg7 25.Qxh5).

A.4.b.iv) 20... Qd1+ 21.Kh2 + -, with the double threat 22.Qg6# and 22.Qxh6#.

B) 16... Ne7 17.Rf7+

B.1) 17... Kg6 18.Qd3+ B(N)f5 19.Nxf5 wins (19... N(B)xf5 20.Qxf5#).

B.2) 17... Kg8 18.Rxe7+ Kf8 19.Rxc7 with threats 20.Qf1+ and 20.Rxc8+ wins decisive material.

C) 16... Nf6 17.exf6+ (17.Rxf6 Qxg3 18.Rf7+ Kg6 19.Qf1 Qe1) followed by 18.Rb3 wins a pawn at least with the better position.

D) 16... c6 17.Rf7+ Kg6 18.Qd3+ Bf5 19.Qxf5#.

Jul-29-16  morfishine: <16.Rxf3>

*****

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: I saw 18.Nh5+ Kf8 but forgot to analyze it (19.Nxf6 Qe1+ draws).
Jul-29-16  grootbrabant: <patzer2: For a Black improvement, 8...Ke8 as in G Marco vs Pillsbury, 1903 looks good for the second player.>

The second player? Do you mean black?

Jul-29-16  beenthere240: It took me a long time to understand the lethality of 19. Bf4.
Jul-29-16  mel gibson: You'd have to be good to see that the sacrifice of the Rook would be a winning move.

The computer saw it straight away but then black did play a lot better than here.

Jul-29-16  Patriot: 16.Rxf3 gxf3 17.Qxf3 but I missed the defense, 17...Nf6. 17...Qe7 18.Nh5+ ends matters quickly.

I probably threw out 17...Nf6 because it just "drops a piece" but that's not a valid reason to reject it when white sacs a rook first! The rook sac made sense to not only stop blacks threat of Qxg3 but to re-capture with the queen and stir up mate threats. So 17...Nf6 is perfectly logical.

I think the real difficulty begins on this move (17...Nf6), and after 18.exf6+ Kf8 (18...Qxf6 19.Nh5+ ) 19.Bf4! (not easy to find) Qxf6?? 20.Be6+ Kg7 21.Nh5+ . 20.Qe4 threatens a simple discovered check, winning the queen, and the threats just keep going.

Jul-29-16  Patriot: <agb2002> <White is a knight down> I never noticed this. But when you count active pieces it's not that way! Still it is important to know what the bar is before beginning to analyze, even though most of the time in these problems one can analyze correctly even without a material count.
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  kevin86: The attack is even worth a rook sacrificed.
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: I am having a problem figuring out the response to 16...Rh7?!


click for larger view

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  tpstar: <Jimfromprovidence> Try chopping wood with 17. Rf7+ Kh8 (17 ... Kg6 18. Qd3+ Bf5 19. Qxf5#) 18. Rxh7+ Kxh7 19. Qd3+ Kg7/Kh8 20. Bxg8 Kxg8 21. Qg6+:


click for larger view

1) 21 ... Kf8 22. Bxh6+ Ke7 23. Bg5+ wins the Queen.

2) 21 ... Kh8 22. Bxh6 Qe7 (covering g7) 23. Bg5 & 24. Bf6/+ wins the Queen.

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <tpstar> <Try chopping wood with 17. Rf7+ Kh8 (17 ... Kg6 18. Qd3+ Bf5 19. Qxf5#) 18. Rxh7+ Kxh7 19. Qd3+ Kg7/Kh8 20. Bxg8 Kxg8 21. Qg6+:>

Thanks, mucho.

I had it slightly differently; 17 Rf7+ Kh8 18 Rxh7+ Kxh7 19 Qd3+ Kh8, then 20 Qg6.


click for larger view

I got stuck after 20...Be6 Bxe6 21 Nc6.


click for larger view

I could not determine if white could move his knight safely because of the queen check on e1.

Jul-29-16  olinart: In the game played, 20 ..Qxf6 21.Be5 Qe7 22.Rf1+ Ke8 gets black out of the attack at the cost of a pawn. Nevertheless the rook sac got white out of serious trouble.
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  patzer2: <grootbrabrandt> Yes by "the second player" I mean Black. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloss....
Jul-29-16  ruzon: <Jimfromprovidence> In your diagram, 22. Bf5 seals the deal. 22...Nf6 postpones mate by one move.
Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  agb2002: <Patriot: <agb2002> <White is a knight down> I never noticed this. But when you count active pieces it's not that way! Still it is important to know what the bar is before beginning to analyze, even though most of the time in these problems one can analyze correctly even without a material count.>

The material count is the very first task I consider in any position, even it's just a forced mate in two, for a number of reasons (if you don't like them I have others):

-It's a matter of habit, or discipline if you like, and also the typical chess manual first step in the evaluation of a position (mainly dynamic or mainly static).

-For most puzzles, it is rarely a mate in two, with the exception of Mondays which are normally only Chess 101.

-One may discover an 'elegant' combination resulting in a gain of, say, two pawns but then it turns out that one only has two pawns for a piece.

-The result of an attack combination might be material advantage or a better ending in which every pawn and piece counts.

-For example, one may have an exchange deficit due to a previous attacking combination and have the possibility of keeping the attack alive or reach an endgame such that the bishop pair is stronger than a rook and a knight.

-The material count and the interactions amongst pieces give an idea of what pieces should be kept and what could be traded or even sacrificed.

-It is a simple method to slow down somewhat if one has a marked tendency to rush with the 'solution' and I'm in a rush now because my family is waiting for me to have dinner...

Jul-29-16  Patriot: <agb2002> (Patriot clicks the "Like" button)
Jul-29-16  dehanne: I knew the game as a former King's Gambit player.
Jul-29-16  Patriot: <agb2002>

<-One may discover an 'elegant' combination resulting in a gain of, say, two pawns but then it turns out that one only has two pawns for a piece.> This is true especially OTB. For puzzle problems where it is known there is a winning combination, usually the "maximum effect" of material or mate is correct no matter what the material count is. But I think it is more important to practice as one plays because when you play you want that kind of thinking to be automatic. One could also say that OTB there shouldn't be a need to take stock in material because you should know the material difference at all times, so jumping into "solving" a puzzle isn't necessarily out of line with that process--it's usually safe to assume the elegant combination is correct!

Jul-29-16  drollere: i had 16. Bf4 followed by Qd3, c3 etc.

the sacrifice is cute, but i don't see reason to rush things. the annoying Q aside black does not have a convincing attack with 2 p's, the white K is well defended by several pieces, and the black K is out in the open.

the black Q sacrifice, if not a blunder, seems panicky.

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  Jimfromprovidence: <ruzon> <In your diagram, 22. Bf5 seals the deal. 22...Nf6 postpones mate by one move.>

I'm not sure about the mate part because after 22 Bf5 black has 22...Qe7, below. You did answer my question, so thanks for that, since white does not have to worry about queen checks after 22...Qe7 to win.

He can follow with 23 Bxh6 with multiple threats, as an example.


click for larger view

Jul-29-16
Premium Chessgames Member
  DarthStapler: I got the first two moves
Jul-29-16  King.Arthur.Brazil: I follow the game, after my proposal, and the moves I do wrong were: 19.Bf4!... I tried Qe3. 20.Qe4!... I went on Be5? 22.Bh6+!, I did Bd6+, with same idea (now) but this is not the better move anyway, I did wrong. Again I didn't find 20.c3, but played 20.Nf5 directly that is not so good this time. I did right the two checks and Nh6, but I was expecting some answer to continue the game, but Black resignes and I feel sorry, cause I begin to enjoy the game... lgs.
search thread:   
< Earlier Kibitzing  · PAGE 2 OF 2 ·  Later Kibitzing>
NOTE: You need to pick a username and password to post a reply. Getting your account takes less than a minute, is totally anonymous, and 100% free—plus, it entitles you to features otherwise unavailable. Pick your username now and join the chessgames community!
If you already have an account, you should login now.
Please observe our posting guidelines:
  1. No obscene, racist, sexist, profane, raunchy, or disgusting language.
  2. No spamming, advertising, duplicate or nonsense posts.
  3. No malicious personal attacks, including cyber stalking, systematic antagonism, or gratuitous name-calling of any member Iincludinfgall Admin and Owners or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. If you think someone is an idiot, then provide evidence that their reasoning is invalid and/or idiotic, instead of just calling them an idiot. It's a subtle but important distinction, even in political discussions.
  4. Nothing in violation of United States law.
  5. No malicious posting of or linking to personal, private, and/or negative information (aka "doxing" or "doxxing") about any member, (including all Admin and Owners) or any of their family, friends, associates, or business interests. This includes all media: text, images, video, audio, or otherwise. Such actions will result in severe sanctions for any violators.
  6. NO TROLLING. Admin and Owners know it when they see it, and sanctions for any trolls will be significant.
  7. Any off-topic posts which distract from the primary topic of discussion are subject to removal.
  8. The use of "sock puppet" accounts to circumvent disciplinary action taken by Moderators is expressly prohibited.
  9. The use of "sock puppet" accounts in an attempt to undermine any side of a debate—or to create a false impression of consensus or support—is prohibited.
  10. All decisions with respect to deleting posts, and any subsequent discipline, are final, and occur at the sole discretion of the Moderators, Admin, and Owners.
  11. Please try to maintain a semblance of civility at all times.
Blow the Whistle See something that violates our rules? Blow the whistle and inform a Moderator.

NOTE: Keep all discussion on the topic of this page. This forum is for this specific game and nothing else. If you want to discuss chess in general, or this site, visit the Kibitzer's Café.

Messages posted by Chessgames members do not necessarily represent the views of Chessgames.com, its employees, or sponsors. All Moderator actions taken are at the sole discretion of the Admin and Owners—who will strive to act fairly and consistently at all times.

This game is type: CLASSICAL. Please report incorrect or missing information by submitting a correction slip to help us improve the quality of our content.

<This page contains Editor Notes. Click here to read them.>

Featured in the Following Game Collections[what is this?]
chocobonbon's favorite games
by chocobonbon
dedicated to Tal + others
by hartkoka
KGA. Allgaier Gambit Urusov Attack (C39) 1-0 land, sea & air!!
from Some S-upermen of Yesteryeary by fredthebear
Another must-see..
from Stunners by xajik
King's Gambit and Sacrifices Galore
from Ratul's favorite games by Ratul
Tearing down the curtains (I have this as 1904)
from Awesome Games (1900-25) by Eric Schiller
5/6
from Games of the day for 2016. by truepacifism
The Games of Rudolf Spielmann
by rbaglini
Chess Highlights of the 20th Century (1/3)
by 50movesaheadofyou
General Hellraising!
from Alapin 2...Nd5 ....4.Bc4 gambit line by Nova
Gambito de Rey
by Chessdreamer
algaier gambit with mating sacs
from KGA-Knight Gambit -.Older Style continuations by takchess
Spielmann - the last romantic player
from Beginning of the 20th century by Calar
"The Joys of Chess" by Fred Reinfeld
from yPublished Games by Year and Unconfirmed Source by fredthebear
Game 12
from 20th Century Highlights (Burgess) by rajeshupadhyay
played like a 19th C game!
from 19 th century classics by kevin86
Line Clearance Sacrifice (ii)
from Art of Sacrifice in Chess, R. Spielmann by CherrylandCafe
Munich 1903
from Spielmann: Chess Biography by jessicafischerqueen


home | about | login | logout | F.A.Q. | your profile | preferences | Premium Membership | Kibitzer's Café | Biographer's Bistro | new kibitzing | chessforums | Tournament Index | Player Directory | Notable Games | World Chess Championships | Opening Explorer | Guess the Move | Game Collections | ChessBookie Game | Chessgames Challenge | Store | privacy notice | contact us


Copyright 2001-2019, Chessgames Services LLC